Distributed February 7, 2000
For Immediate Release
News Service Contact: Mark Nickel



Sixteen films, English subtitles

Brown to offer French Film Festival at Cable Car Cinema Feb. 10-20
The Department of French Studies at Brown University will present a Festival of French Film, Feb. 10 through 20, 2000. All films, in French with English subtitles, will be screened at the Cable Car Cinema, 204 South Main St. in Providence.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — The Department of French Studies at Brown will present a French Film Festival from Thursday, Feb. 10, through Sunday, Feb. 20, 2000, at the Cable Car Cinema, 204 South Main St. Sixteen films will be featured, all in French with English subtitles.

Faculty from Brown, the Rhode Island School of Design and Boston College will participate in three roundtable discussions as part of the festival. “Cinema and Society” will be the topic on Sunday, Feb. 13, at 6 p.m.; “The Films of Claire Denis” will be discussed at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 19; and “Making Films in France” will be the final discussion at 1:45 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 20.

Admission to individual films will be $3, with festival passes available for $15 ($10 for students). A complete schedule and a summary of the films appear below. For additional information, call (401) 272-3970.

The Festival Schedule

Thursday, February 10

  • 7 p.m. Same Old Song (On connaît la chanson,) Alain Resnais, 1998, 120 min.
  • 9:30 p.m. In the Land the Deaf (Au pays des sourds), Nicolas Philibert, 1993, 99 min.

Friday, February 11

  • 7 p.m. Those Who Love Me Can Take The Train (Ceux qui m’aiment prendront le train), Patrice Chéreau, 1998, 120 min.
  • 9:30 p.m. L’Ennui, Cédric Kahn, 1998, 120 min.

Saturday, February 12

  • 1 p.m. Same Old Song (On connaît la chanson), Alain Resnais, 1998, 120 min.
  • 4 p.m. Life on Earth (La Vie sur terre), Abderrahmane Sissako, 1998, 60 min.
  • 7 p.m. L’Ennui, Cédric Kahn, 1998, 120 min.
  • 9:30 p.m. Those Who Love Me Can Take The Train (Ceux qui m’aiment prendront le train), Patrice Chéreau, 1998, 120 min.

Sunday, February 13

  • 1 p.m. Tomorrow, and Again Tomorrow (Demain et encore demain), Dominique Cabrera, 1998, 119 min.
  • 4 p.m. Nadia and the Hippos (Nadia et les hippopotames), 1999, 102 min.
  • 6 p.m. “Cinema and Society,” roundtable with Dominique Cabrera (director); Dominque Arel, Watson Institute, Brown University; Maurizia Natale, Rhode Island School of Design; Peter Uvin, Watson Institute
  • 7 p.m. The Banned Woman (La femme défendue), Philippe Harel, 1997, 100 min.
  • 9:30 p.m. Same Old Song (On connaît la chanson), Alain Resnais, 1998, 120 min.

Monday, February 14

  • 7 p.m. Late August, Early September (Fin août, début septembre), Olivier Assayas, 1998, 112 min.
  • 9:30 p.m. The Banned Woman (La femme défendue), Philippe Harel, 1997, 100 min.

Tuesday, February 15

  • 7 p.m. In the Land the Deaf (Au pays des sourds), Nicolas Philibert, 1993, 99 min.
  • 9:30 p.m. Nadia and the Hippos (Nadia et les hippopotames), 1999, 102 min.

Wednesday, February 16

  • 7 p.m. Chocolate (Chocolat), Claire Denis, 1988, 110 min.
  • 9:30 p.m. No Fear, No Die (S’en fout la mort), 1990, 104 min.

Thursday, February 17

  • 7 p.m. I Can’t Sleep (J’ai pas sommeil), Claire Denis, 110 min.
  • 9:30 p.m. Nenette and Boni (Nénette et Boni), Claire Denis, 1996, 103 min.

Friday, February 18

  • 7 p.m. Good Work (Le beau travail), Claire Denis, 1999, 90 min.
  • 9:30 p.m. I Can’t Sleep (J’ai pas sommeil), Claire Denis, 110 min.

Saturday, February 19

  • 1 p.m. Nenette and Boni (Nénette et Boni), Claire Denis, 1996, 103 min.
  • 4 p.m. Good Work (Le beau travail), Claire Denis, 1999, 90 min
  • 5:30 p.m. “The Films of Claire Denis,” roundtable with Grégoire Colin (actor); Roger Mayer, Brown University; Michael Silverman, Brown University.
  • 7 p.m. Late August, Early September (Fin août, début septembre), Olivier Assayas, 1998, 112 min.
  • 9:30 p.m. I Stand Alone (Seul contre tous), Gaspar Noé, 1998, 93 min.

Sunday, February 20

  • 1 p.m. Aïd el Kebir, Karin Albou, 1999, 35 min.
  • 1:45 p.m. “Making Films in France,” roundtable with Karin Albou (director); Ourida Mostefai, Boston College; Sylvie Toux, Brown University
  • 4 p.m. Life on Earth (La Vie sur terre), Abderrahmane Sissako, 1998, 60 min.
  • 7 p.m. I Stand Alone (Seul contre tous), Gaspar Noé, 1998, 93 min.
  • 9:30 p.m. No Fear, No Die (S’en fout la mort), 1990, 104 min.

The Films

Same Old Song (On Connaît La Chanson)
Directed by Alain Resnais, France, 1998, 120 min.
Awards: Best Film, César, Cannes 1998

In this tribute to the British screenwriter Dennis Potter, the legendary director Alain Resnais of “Hiroshima mon amour” has created a film about a circle of friends who express their secret desires by breaking into snatches of popular songs. The film shows Paris and Parisians at their best and worst, all the while lip-synching to tunes by France Gall, Johnny Haliday, the rock group Telephone, or Maurice Chevalier. The story follows six intertwined characters as they try to find happiness in the great city of lights. Starring Pierre Arditi, Sabine Azéma, Jean-Pierre Bacri, André Dussolier Agnès Jaoui, Lambert Wilson.

In The Land Of Deaf (Au Pays Des Sourds)
Directed by Nicolas Philibert, France, 1994, 99 min.
Awards: Golden Gate Award documentary

Anyone who has ever journeyed to the “land of the deaf” has been struck by the silent signs with which deaf people express themselves. With their profound deafness in common, the children and adults featured in this film communicate their dreams and thoughts through signs. Philibert focuses his camera on group of schoolchildren who are learning how to communicate in a world where they must read lips and speak words. “Au pays des sourds” has won countless international prizes at festivals around the world from San Francisco to Bombay to Vancouver and Valladolid.

Those Who Love Me Can Take The Train (Ceux Qui M’aiment Prendront Le Train)
Directed by Patrice Chéreau, France, 1998, 122 min.
Awards: Best Director, César, Cannes, 1998.

A visually striking film in its hand-held cinemascope photography. United by their love for a deceased man, an array of colorful personalities converge on the train to his burial. Love, sex, fidelity, drug addiction, and suicide become topics of conversation on their four hour journey. The aftermath, in the mansion of the dead man’s brother, attains revelatory proportions and evokes the kind of emotion that only talented directors can achieve. Starring Charles Berling, Dominique Blanc, Valéria Bruni-Tedeschi, Marie Daems, Pascal Gregory , Sylvain Jacques, Bruno Todeschini, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Roschdy Zem

L’ennui
Directed by Cédric Kahn, France, 1998, 120 min.

Martin, a philosophy professor, is undergoing a mid-life crisis. Through a set of strange circumstances, he meets a girl who was responsible for driving an old painter to his death. Fascinated by the story of her relationship with the old man, Martin slowly succumbs to her charms. But as their relationship continues, she only seems to become more and more enigmatic, alternating between alluring innocence and utter indifference, fueling his inexorable destruction. Starring Maurice Antoni, Charles Berling, Arielle Dombasle, Alice Grey, Sophie Guillemin, Robert Kramer

Life On Earth (La Vie Sur Terre)
Directed by Abderrahmane Sissako, France, 1998, 61 min.

Part of the series “2000 Seen By,” this film offers a unique look into the culture of Mauritania, a community rarely seen on film. On the eve of the 21st century, Sissako, an African filmmaker living in France returns to his native village of Sokolo where the coming of the millennium has aroused little interest. Free from the frenzy of the year 2000, Sissako’s pilgrimage home offers an oasis of peace and simplicity. Starring Nana Baby, Bourama Coulibaly, Abderrahmane Sissako, Mohammed Sissako.

Tomorrow and Again Tomorrow (Demain Et Encore Demain)
Directed by Dominique Cabrera, France, 1998, 79 min.

Images of a life, country, and an era scarred by doubt as a troubled and questioning woman takes a camera and films her everyday life. This autobiographical film is an intimate piece of reality – painful, yet filled with hope; a sensitive portrait of the artist behind the camera. Starring Dominique Cabrera

Nadia and The Hippos (Nadia Et Les Hippopotames)
Directed by Dominique Cabrera, France, 1999, 102 min.

In winter, 1995, during a massive transportation strike, Nadia and her six-month old son leave Paris in search of the father. Encounters with a group of strikers lead to a personal-cum-political odyssey in which the government’s labor policies are seriously questioned. Starring Laurent Arnal, Ariane Ascaride, Pierre Berriau, Michel Bony, Marilyne Canto, Thierry Frémont, Philippe Fretun, Olivier Gourmet, Nadj Hamou-Medja, Sasha and Ruben Nakache

The Banned Woman (La Femme Défendue)
Directed by Philippe Harel, France, 1997, 100 min.

Adultery might seem like a tired subject, but here its banality is surpassed by the subtlety of the script and the quality of the mise-en-scene. A French comedy-drama filmed with a subjective camera, the film presents the first-person point-of-view of a married man as he meets, flirts with, seduces, and falls in love with a beautiful young woman. Starring Isabelle Carré, Natalie Conio, Philippe Harel, Julien Niedergang, Sophie Niedergang.

Late August, Early September (Fin Août, Début Septembre)
Directed by Olivier Assayas, France, 1998, 112 min

Originally given the title of “Snapshots,” Late August, Early September captures the experience of a group of thirty-something Parisians and their slow passage out of painful adolescence. When an old illness begins to take its toll on one of the group, the others are forced to take notice that time is passing and they are growing older. Starring Mathieu Almaric, Jeanne Balibar, François Cluzet, Virginie Ledoyen.

Chocolate (Chocolat)
Directed by Claire Denis, France, 1988, 105 min.

Visually breathtaking and emotionally haunting, this stunning directorial debut by Claire Denis presents a side of 1950s Africa – and of youth – never before captured on film. France Dalens, the daughter of a colonial official, has returned to trace her past. Soon, the rush of sights, sounds and smells sweep her back to her childhood, to a desolate land of harsh, haunting beauty. Stifling isolation and sexual frustration create an undercurrent of tension that threatens to explode as an assortment of Europeans pass through their sun-baked outpost. Starring Guilia Boschi, Isaach de Bankole, François Cluzet, Richard Courget, Beatrice Dalle, Alex Descas.

No Fear, No Die (S’en Fout La Mort)
Directed by Claire Denis, France, 1990, 97 min.

Dah, an African immigrant, and Jocelyn, a West Indian man hook up to supply and train fighting cocks for a sleazy French saloon owner. The two live in the back of the club, and while Jocelyn trains the birds, Dah becomes entangled with the owner’s mistress. Soon all four are cast into a violent circle of gambling, desire and agony, spinning out of control. Starring Isaach de Bankolé, Jean-Claude Brialy, Alex Descas, Solveig Dommartin.

I Can’t Sleep (J’ai Pas Sommeil)
Directed by Claire Denis, France, 1994, 110 min.

A Latvian in Paris, a couple of homosexuals, an old lady’s murderer, some African immigrants, a hotel manager protecting the young Lativan, a transvestite who performs at a local night club, crime, and assorted odd occurrences all come together in the complex plot of Claire Denis’ third film, her follow-up to “No Fear, No Die.” Starring Richard Courcet, Béatrice Dalle, Alex Descas, Vincent Dupont, Yekaterina Golubyova, Patrick Grandperret, Irina Grjebina, Line Renaud, Sophie Simon.

Nenette and Boni (Nénette et Boni)
Directed by Claire Denis, France, 1996, 90 min.
Awards: Golden Leopard, 1996(Lucarno), Golden Bayard, 1996 (Namur).

Nenette and Boni, is a thoroughly engaging tale about sibling bonds. Set in working-class Marseilles, the film focuses on a sister and brother who are brought together following the death of their mother. Denis brings both pathos and more than a small measure of humor to bear in portraying their conflicted feelings for each other, toward their parents, and about their own needs and desires. Starring.Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi, Grégoire Colin, Alex Descas, Jamila Farah, Vincent Gallo, Alice Houri, Gérard Meylan, Jacques Nolot.

Good Work (Le Beau Travail)
Directed by Claire Denis, France, 1999, 90 min.

Inspired by Melville’s Billy Budd, Beau Travail is the most provocative film yet by Claire Denis, an exploration of a special, very enclosed male world through its rituals, codes and barely contained emotional conflicts. In the east African enclave of Djibouti, the men of a small French Legion outpost spend their days in isolation. Barely older than his charges, Sergeant seems a perfect Legionnaire, running his troop like a well-oiled machine until the arrival of new recruit, Sentier, threatens to upset the delicate balance that is his life. Starring Grégoire Colin, Richard Courcet, Denis Lavant, Michel Subor.

I Stand Alone (Seul Contre Tous)
Directed by Gaspard Noé, France, 1997, 93 min. Awards: Critics Week, Cannes.

Gaspard Noe’s feature film debut is a harsh portrait of contemporary French life. “Seul contre tous” centers around a middle-aged unemployed butcher who is trying to salvage a life that has long been on the skids. As his hopes of finding work are crushed, his bitterness towards the world begins to take on frightening proportions. Motivated by racism, misogyny and a hair-trigger temper, the butcher seems ready to blow at any minute. Be forewarned, a journey inside this man’s mind, as difficult as it is to watch, will change the way you see French culture forever. Starring Martine Audrain, Blandine Lenoir, Frankyle Le Pain, Philipp Nahon.

Aid El Kébir
Directed by Karin Albou, France, 1998, 35 min.

In eastern Algeria, a family prepares for the feast of sheep. The father, who is dying, wants his youngest daughter, Hanifa, to marry. In this ambience of domestic morbidity, Hanifa must make a difficult personal choice. Starring Faitha Berber, Soria Moufakkir, Smaïl Mekki, Hichem Mesbah, Nina Tahar.

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