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Courses

The Department of Africana Studies course offerings and course descriptions can be downloaded below for easy printing and browsing. The most up-to-date course information can always be found on Banner.

Spring 2014 Courses

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Fall 2013 Courses

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Spring 2013 Courses

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Fall 2012 Courses

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Spring 2012 Courses

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Fall 2011 Courses

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Spring 2011 Courses

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Recent Course Offerings and Descriptions

AFRI 0160 Sec 01 - Twentieth-Century Africa

An introduction to recent African history, the course combines chronological and topical approaches. It is organized around the major epochs of colonialism, decolonization and post-colonial independence, but within those periods, we will concentrate on themes such as health, environment, development, the state and artistic expression. Readings draw heavily on primary sources. Three exams and two projects, including group work.
Professor Jacobs
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AFRI 0220 Sec 01 - Introduction to African American History from Emancipation to the Present

This course explores African American History through the lens of black freedom struggles. The struggles take all forms, between black and white from local to national levels, within and between black communities, and between men and women. This course assumes some familiarity with basic U.S. History and will utilize a variety of primary sources from autobiographical material to visual art and music as well as the usual monographs and articles. Aside from reading, students will be required to do some research, and write historical prose. Priority to freshmen and sophomores in Africana Studies and History. 3 papers; 2 exams.
Professor Hamlin
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AFRI 0990 Sec 01 - Black Lavender: Black Gay/Lesbian Plays/Dramatic Constructions in the American Theatre

An interdisciplinary approach to the study of plays that address the identities and issues of black gay men and lesbians and offers various perspectives from within and without the black gay and lesbian artistic communities. Focuses on analysis of unpublished titles. Also includes published works by Baraka, Bullins, Corbitt, Gibson, Holmes, West, and Pomo Afro Homos. Some evening screenings of videotapes. Enrollment limited to 20. Written permission required.
Professor Terry-Morgan
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AFRI 1050A Sec 01 - Advanced RPM Playwriting

Interested students should register for AFRI1050A, Sec. 01.
Professor Terry-Morgan
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AFRI 1050D Sec 01 - Intermediate RPM Playwriting

Interested students should register for AFRI1050D, Sec. 01.
Professor Terry-Morgan
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AFRI 1050E Sec 01 - RPM Playwriting

Playwriting is a creative process of interpreting research on a topic or issue into the form of a play or performance work. This course is designed for students committed to the long-term meticulous process of research, inquiry, experimentation, and re-writing.
Professor Terry-Morgan
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AFRI 1050M Sec 01 – Roots of African American Fiction: Oral Narrative through Richard Wright

This course will employ a variety of narrative forms -- oral folktales, WPA narratives, slave narratives, short stories by European and American writers -- will also investigate the multiple traditions of African American fiction.
Professor Wideman
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AFRI 1050P Sec 01 – Art and Civic Engagement: Creativity/Reality

The primary objective of this course is to learn about and reflect upon public art and communities - locally and nationally. This course will use selected public art and artists' ideologies as a framework for exploring culture, creativity, politics and practices. The course will focus on the ways in which these public art works and artists' responses to varied forms of internal and external operators and stimuli successfully and unsuccessfully give voice to aspects of the environment, history, culture, social justice, health, politics and the imagination. Throughout the course existing public art and arts projects will be used to illustrate and explore topics, ideas, unique issues and concerns. Guest speakers will share their experiences, knowledge and ideas. Students will focus on practical application for approaching public art projects. This course will also pay attention to arts organizations, government agencies, history, power relations, human resources as well as leadership and the political that continues to impact and influence these public modes of artistic production. Finally the course will examine dynamics that inform approaches to public art - purpose, performance, space, time, and function.
Ms. Karen Allen Baxter
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AFRI 1060P African Literature: Chinua Achebe

This course closely analyzes the major literary and critical works of Chinua Achebe. In particular, students will explore how Chinua Achebe’s novels and essays define and explore issues of culture, family, language, identity and politics in post-colonial Africa. Student will consider the ways that Achebe reframes and contests the traditional and widely-held interpretations, understandings and assumptions of African people, ways of thinking and what constitutes literature. Course will be led by Professor Michael Thelwell, The C. Raymond Adams and Rachel B. Adams Visiting Professor in Africana Studies. Professor Achebe will attend several classes to engage students in conversation on his work and the larger themes and issues related to African literature.
Interested students must attend the first class. Enrollment permission will be granted by Professor Thelwell after the first class meeting.
Professor Ndibe
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AFRI 1150 Sec 01 - Afro-Caribbean Philosophy

An introduction to the field of Afro-Caribbean philosophy. The first half focuses on the history of the field, identifying its African background and surveying some of its major schools, such as the Afro-Christians, the poeticists, the historicists, and existentialists. The second half consists of a more intensive comparative focus on the ontologies and epistemologies of two of these schools.
Professor Henry
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AFRI 1260 Sec 01 - The Organizing Tradition of the Southern Civil Rights Movement

This seminar aims to fill in some of the gaps of the official canon by emphasizing that the modern (1954-1966) southern civil rights movement was not as it is mainly portrayed, a movement of mass protest in public spaces led by charismatic leaders; but rather, a movement of grassroots community organizing - quiet day-to-day work.
Professor Cobb
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AFRI 1360 Sec 01 - Africana Studies: Knowledge, Texts and Methodology

This course will explore the issues of Africana Studies as a discipline by engaging in a series of critical readings of the central texts, which laid the protocols of the discipline. The course will also raise issues of knowledge production and methodologies. This course is a senior capstone seminar.
Professor Bogues
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AFRI 1710A Sec 01 – Political Visions and Community Formations

This course aims to consider the depths of connection between forms of racialized, gender, class and sexual oppression vis-à-vis the creation and maintenance of community and intimate social bonds among the oppressed. We will read sociologists, historians and others who have worked at this intersection and musicians and writers such as: Morrison, Bambara, Baldwin, Hill-Collins, Hansberry, soul and neo-soul artists.
Professor Rose
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SCSO 1550D - Biomedicalization: the Body as a Social Problem

Why are more and more aspects of daily life seen as biomedical problems? What are the social processes and political effects that motivate people to view the body this way? This course explores how contemporary healthand behavior conditions are being defined and treated by analyzing biomedical research, health, and bodily knowledge in its various institutional formations: governmental knowledge, health policy, capital markets, and popular culture. Prerequisites for the course are either one course in medical sociology or anthropology (e.g. Culture and Health) or one in science studies (e.g. Introduction to Science and Society).
Professor Bliss
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AFR 1970 Sec 01 - Independent Reading and Research

Students should contact professor directly regarding independent reading and research
Faculty
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