Cognitive,Linguistic and Psychological Sciences

Integrating the Study of Mind, Brain, Behavior and Language

We are delighted to announce the formation of the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences (CLPS) as of July 2010. CLPS is dedicated to the multidisciplinary study of mind, brain, behavior, and language.

As part of the University's ongoing Plan for Academic Enrichment, CLPS has been formed from the former faculties of the Department of Cognitive & Linguistic Sciences and the Department of Psychology, as well as several new hires. CLPS is housed in a newly renovated 36,000 sq ft building.

New software automatically identifies behaviors of laboratory mice. Using electrophysiology & optogenetics to probe memory. Using an immersive virtual environment to test perception & action. How do we integrate higher-order cognitive processes & actions? How do we select an appropriate action, given our goals? How do we make decisions and learn from experience? Searching for memory. Which variables influence control over learning and action? How do people decide to blame others for their behavior? A stroke leads to resolution of foreign accent syndrome. How does the brain develop & change in response to cues?

Upcoming Events

  • LingLangLunch Seminar Series Download LingLangLunch Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    March 4, 2015 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM Friedman Family Lecture in Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences. Speaker: Tania Rojas-Esponda, Stanford University. Title: Discourse particles and focus effects in a question-under-discussion framework. Abstract: Discourse particles provide important signals in conversation, by helping speakers and hearers coordinate on the course of an interaction. Therefore, a precise understanding of discourse particles will provide new insights into the pragmatics of conversation. I will present a framework based on questions under discussion that allows us to capture the key information-theoretic structures in conversation that seem to affect the use of discourse particles: the presence or absence of presuppositions, the issues guiding a conversation, and how interlocutors move between these issues. In this talk, I will present two case studies of German discourse particles that highlight central aspects of the QUD framework: 'überhaupt' and 'doch.' These raise a challenge found in particle systems in many languages: lexicalized focus. Many languages possess particles that can occur with or without focus, and the meanings associated with the unfocused and focused variants are often very different. Since intonation can have discourse-managing functions similar to that of discourse particles, the effect of having or lacking focus marking directly *on* a particle is different from the effect of focus on regular content words. I will identify patterns that allow us to systematically distinguish the meanings of focused and unfocused particles in a focused/unfocused pair. This serves as a stepping stone towards understanding the interplay of grammar, intonation, and interaction. PLEASE NOTE: THIS EVENT WILL BE HELD IN METCALF, ROOM 031. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Dept: CLPS, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Seminars
  • Tage Rai, Northwestern University Download Tage Rai, Northwestern University to my desktop calendar

    March 9, 2015 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Tage Rai, Northwestern University. Title: Virtuous Violence: Hurting and killing to create, sustain, end, and honor social relationships. Abstract: Violence is often considered the antithesis of sociality — people think that violence is the expression of our animal nature, breaking though when learned cultural norms collapse. Violence is also considered to be the essence of evil: it is the prototype of immorality. But an examination of violent acts and practices across cultures and throughout history shows just the opposite. When people hurt or kill someone, they usually do so because they feel they ought to do so: they feel that it is morally right or even obligatory to do the violence. Moreover, the motives for violence generally grow out of a relationship between the perpetrator and the victim, or their relationships with third parties. The perpetrator is violent to make the relationship right — to make the relationship what it ought to be according to his or her cultural implementations of universal relational moral principles. That is, most violence is morally motivated. Rather than reflecting the breakdown of morality, violence is the performance of moral rights and obligations. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments
  • Oriel Feldman-Hall, NYU Download Oriel Feldman-Hall, NYU to my desktop calendar

    March 11, 2015 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Oriel Feldman-Hall, NYU. Title: Neurocognitive mechanisms of dynamic moral choice. Abstract: How do humans make choices despite competing pressures of fairness, harm, self-interest, and concern for others? Combining behavioral and neuroscientific methods, my research explores the social, emotional and cognitive factors that shape and ultimately guide these complex moral choices. The human moral calculus involves a balance of motivated actions (Should I help others at a cost to my self?) and responses to immoral behavior (How do I respond to unfair treatment?). Across several studies, I illustrate how motivations to be altruistic and fair are highly sensitive to the context in which the dilemma is framed. Moreover, I show that moral behavior is dependent on factors relating to emotional engagement—including empathy and distress—and that these affective mechanisms rely on distinct neural circuits. Taken together, my research demonstrates that while moral behavior is flexibly deployed, there are key factors that can systematically bias these social choices. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments