Cognitive,Linguistic and Psychological Sciences

Integrating the Study of Mind, Brain, Behavior and Language

We are delighted to announce the formation of the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences (CLPS) as of July 2010. CLPS is dedicated to the multidisciplinary study of mind, brain, behavior, and language.

As part of the University's ongoing Plan for Academic Enrichment, CLPS has been formed from the former faculties of the Department of Cognitive & Linguistic Sciences and the Department of Psychology, as well as several new hires. CLPS is housed in a newly renovated 36,000 sq ft building.

How do people decide to blame others for their behavior? Using an immersive virtual environment to test perception & action. How does the brain develop & change in response to cues? Which variables influence control over learning and action? How do we make decisions and learn from experience? How do we integrate higher-order cognitive processes & actions? Searching for memory. How do we select an appropriate action, given our goals? A stroke leads to resolution of foreign accent syndrome. Using electrophysiology & optogenetics to probe memory. New software automatically identifies behaviors of laboratory mice.

Upcoming Events

  • CLPS Department Honors Oral Presentations Download CLPS Department Honors Oral Presentations to my desktop calendar

    April 15, 2014 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM Time: 4:30 p.m. Student: Sahil Luthra, Cognitive Neuroscience Title: Speaker Information in Spoken Word Recognition: An Investigation Using False Memories Advisor: Sheila Blumstein Time: 5:00 p.m. Student: Mary Samantha English, Cognitive Neuroscience Title: Perception of Acoustic Cry Characteristics in Infants with Autism Spectrum Disorder Advisor: Stephen Sheinkopf http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Departments, Other, Other Events
  • LingLangLunch Download LingLangLunch to my desktop calendar

    April 16, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Speaker: Lee Edelist, Brown University. Title: Pronoun resolution in multi utterance discourse. Abstract: This talk will look at several pragmatic theories of pronoun resolution (Centering, Accessibility theory and Coherence based theory), will identify how they complement each other, and point out what is still not accounted for. Mainly, all of these theories focus on examples that consist of one or two consecutive utterances. Natural discourse, though, is not limited to two utterance stints. I'll show that when co-reference is carried over multiple utterances, the rules are a bit different than what has been described thus far. Finally, i'll discuss a proposed study that will observe readers judgments of the identity of pronoun referents in conditions when different theories hold conflicting predictions. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Brown Bag Lunch, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments
  • Imri Sofer PhD Defense Download Imri Sofer PhD Defense to my desktop calendar

    April 16, 2014 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM Setting boundaries in space: A model of rapid visual categorization of natural images Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, Audience, Departments
  • CLPS Honors Oral Presentations Download CLPS Honors Oral Presentations to my desktop calendar

    April 17, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Time: 4:00 p.m. Student: Julia Gibson, Cognitive Science Title: Relational Structures in Visual Attention and Similarity Perception Advisor: Paul Allopenna Time: 4:30 p.m. Student: Julia Lynford, Psychology Title: Parent Expectancy and Treatment Response in Psychiatrically Disordered Preschoolers Advisor: John Boekamp Time: 5:00 p.m. Student: Andrea Wister, Psychology Title: Exploring Exploration: How Evidence Affects 4- and 5-year-old Children's Exploratory Play Advisor: David Sobel http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Departments, Other, Other Events
  • Social Cognitive Science Brown Bag Lunch Series Download Social Cognitive Science Brown Bag Lunch Series to my desktop calendar

    April 18, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Speaker: Peter Blake, BU. Title: Learning to give: Parent effects on children's altruistic behavior. Abstract: Young children are prosocial in many ways: they spontaneously share information and help unfamiliar adults. However, when prosocial actions carry a higher cost, as when giving away valuable resources, a basic self-interest appears and persists into elementary school. Early research on social learning showed that adults can influence children's giving behavior, but this work had two limitations: 1) parents, the primary agents of socialization in early childhood, were never assessed and 2) the tasks used did not allow for systematic measurement of influence on the child's giving behavior. I will present evidence from three experimental studies measuring the effects of parent models on children's altruistic giving. In all, we used a variation of the Dictator Game (DG) - parents modeled different levels of giving to an anonymous recipient while their child watched and then the child did a DG with an anonymous child recipient. In Study 1, we found a dose-response effect on children's giving that diminished with age. In Study 2, we found that children with certain variants of the DRD4 allele were more influenced by generous parent models. In Study 3, we compared parent influence in the US and India and found a stronger effect of parents in India, particularly for older children. In ongoing work (Study 4), we compare the effects of parents and unfamiliar adults on altruistic giving and a categorization task. Together, these studies provide evidence that parent influence on children's costly altruistic behavior varies by model content, age, genetics and culture. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Brown Bag Lunch, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments
  • Cognition Seminar Download Cognition Seminar to my desktop calendar

    April 18, 2014 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM Speaker: David Somers, Boston University. Title: Human Fronto-Parietal Attention Networks for Space, Time, and Perception. Abstract: Vision and audition are each capable of coding spatial and temporal information, but the visual systems excels at spatial processing and the auditory system excels at temporal processing. We propose the Domain Recruitment Hypothesis - brain regions that support visual cognition will be recruited by spatially demanding tasks and that brain regions that support auditory cognition will be recruited by temporally demanding tasks, independent of the sensory modality of the stimuli.I will present the results of fMRI experiments investigating short-term memory (STM) for space and for time in both the auditory and visual domains. Direct contrast of auditory attention and visual attention tasks reveals two auditory attention network regions spatially interleaved with two visual attention network regions within the lateral frontal cortex. Resting-state fMRI demonstrates that these frontal regions exhibit highly selective functional connectivity to posterior attention networks of the same sensory modality (vision-parietal; audition-temporal). The results of two pairs of unimodal STM tasks strongly support the Domain Recruitment Hypothesis: A purely visual task with high temporal demands recruits the frontal auditory regions more strongly than a visual task with high spatial demands and a purely auditory task with high spatial demands recruits the frontal visual regions more strongly than an auditory task with high temporal demands. These findings demonstrate functional links between sensory modality (vision/audition) and information domain (space/time) and advance our understanding of the functional organization of human lateral frontal cortex. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Seminars
  • CLPS Department Honors Oral Presentations Download CLPS Department Honors Oral Presentations to my desktop calendar

    April 21, 2014 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM Time: 4:00 p.m. Student: Lauren Bilsky, Linguistics Title: Machine Translation using Grounded Language Advisors: Uriel Cohen Priva, Eugene Charniak Time: 4:30 p.m. Student: Jackson Golden, Linguistics Title: Compositional Semantics of Focused Pronouns in Variable-Free Semantics Advisor: Pauline Jacobson Time: 5:00 p.m. Student: Mega Keough, Linguistics Title: Complex Codas in Imdlawn Tashlhiyt Berber: A Ganging Up Effect Advisor: Uriel Cohen Priva Time: 5:30 p.m. Student: Robin Sifre, Cognitive Neuroscience Title: It’s Not How You Did It, But What You Did: The Direct Effect of Outcomes on Punishment Advisor: Fiery Cushman http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Departments, Other, Other Events
  • CLPS Honors Oral Presentations Download CLPS Honors Oral Presentations to my desktop calendar

    April 22, 2014 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM Time: 4:00 p.m. Student: Nestor Noyola, Psychology Title: Ameliorating Differences in Performance: Cognitive Test Anxiety, Related Constructs, and the Effect of Expecting Temporally Proximate Grades on Exam Performance Advisor: Brian Hayden Time: 4:30p.m. Student Robin Martens, Cognitive Neuroscience Title: TBA Advisor: Thomas Serre Time: 5:00 p.m. Student: Perri Katzman, Cognitive Neuroscience Title: Effects of Perceived Oldness and Task Success on Subsequent Memory Advisor: David Badre Time: 5:30 p.m. Student: Julia Shube, Cognitive Science Title: The Effect of Explanation on Understanding Scientific Processes Without Provided Information Advisor: Steven Sloman http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Departments, Other, Other Events
  • CLPS SPECIAL SEMINAR - Michael Saddoris, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill Download CLPS SPECIAL SEMINAR - Michael Saddoris, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill to my desktop calendar

    April 23, 2014 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM CLPS SPECIAL SEMINAR - Speaker: Michael Saddoris, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Title: Finding Meaning in Phasic Dopamine Signal(s): Learning, Value and Addiction. Host: Rebecca Burwell Abstract: Rapid dopamine signaling within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) has been implicated in a variety of motivational processes, including associative learning, choice behavior and more problematically, addiction. However, given this wide range of functions, it has been difficult to isolate which specific features of this signal are important in supporting these processes. In this talk, I will present recent data from behavioral experiments using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, electrophysiology and optogenetics to demonstrate that interactions between mesolimbic dopamine signaling and NAc activity play a critical role in key aspects of motivational behavior. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Seminars
  • Kathryn Kalafut Dissertation Defense Download Kathryn Kalafut Dissertation Defense to my desktop calendar

    April 23, 2014 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM The Quantification of Behavior in the Presence of Compound Stimuli Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, Audience, Departments
  • SPECIAL EVENT: "ROBOT & FRANK" Download SPECIAL EVENT: "ROBOT & FRANK" to my desktop calendar

    April 29, 2014 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Special Event: “ROBOT & FRANK” - Tuesday, April 29, 6 PM - 8 PM, Salomon 001 Doors open @ 5:45. Free screening @ 6:00, Discussion @ 7:30. Immediately following the film, join us for a lively discussion with the leaders of Brown's Humanity-Centered Robotics Initiative — Professors Bertram Malle (Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences), Michael Littman (Computer Science), and Chad Jenkins (Computer Science). Popcorn will be available. Even during the film. Presented by the HCRI (Humanity-Centered Robotics Initiative) hcri.brown.edu/ & ISG (Information Security Group) brown.edu/go/isg. RESERVE YOUR SPOT AT brown.edu/go/robot-and-frank http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Salomon Center, Room 001 Dept: CLPS, Departments, Films, Arts and Entertainment