Integrating the Study of Mind, Brain, Behavior, and Language

Our aim is to represent a leading center for the multidisciplinary study of mind, brain, behavior, and language - including such phenomena as perception, thinking, learning, memory, attention, action, personality, speech, language processing, and linguistic structure. The department examines the functional organization of these capacities, the representational and computational processes that underlie them, their neural bases, their development across the lifespan, and how they shape individual and social behavior. (See more...)

 

How do we make decisions and learn from experience? Which variables influence control over learning and action? How do we integrate higher-order cognitive processes & actions? A stroke leads to resolution of foreign accent syndrome. Searching for memory. How do people decide to blame others for their behavior? How does the brain develop & change in response to cues? How do we select an appropriate action, given our goals? New software automatically identifies behaviors of laboratory mice. Using electrophysiology & optogenetics to probe memory. Using an immersive virtual environment to test perception & action.

Upcoming Events

  • Harold Schlosberg Colloquium Download Harold Schlosberg Colloquium to my desktop calendar

    May 4, 2016 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Speaker: Henry M. Wellman, University of Michigan. Title: Learning a Theory of Mind. Abstract: I will argue that “theory of mind” is a developmental achievement. It is minimally scaffolded by several infant proclivities but beyond that must be learned. How so? By children constructing new and later understandings off a platform of their earlier ones. This is a basic, constructivist proposal, all the way back to Piaget, but it is a contentious theoretical one—denied by nativists and empiricists alike. Moreover, empirically, direct evidence for this proposal is in surprisingly short supply, if the focus is sustained, everyday development of major conceptual systems. Research on theory of mind, coupled with contemporary demonstrations from hierarchical Bayesian computational learning, provide the needed evidence and theory. I will overview our data on learning a theory of mind in childhood to show that these data clearly manifest three empirical signatures of such a process of constructivist conceptual development: (1) learning proceeds in orderly conceptual progressions. (2) Sequences and timetables are experience-dependent. And (3) prior conceptual knowledge influences the presence and amount of learning. More intriguingly, perhaps, I will cover studies that provide cross-cultural data, data from typically developing children but also those with developmental delay, experimental micro-genetic research, and more. brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Building, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Departments
  • Henry Wellman, University of Michigan Download Henry Wellman, University of Michigan to my desktop calendar

    May 4, 2016 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Harold Schlosberg Colloquium. Title: Learning a Theory of Mind. Abstract: Abstract: I will argue that “theory of mind” is a developmental achievement. It is minimally scaffolded by several infant proclivities but beyond that must be learned. How so? By children constructing new and later understandings off a platform of their earlier ones. This is a basic, constructivist proposal, all the way back to Piaget, but it is a contentious theoretical one—denied by nativists and empiricists alike. Moreover, empirically, direct evidence for this proposal is in surprisingly short supply, if the focus is sustained, everyday development of major conceptual systems. Research on theory of mind, coupled with contemporary demonstrations from hierarchical Bayesian computational learning, provide the needed evidence and theory. I will overview our data on learning a theory of mind in childhood to show that these data clearly manifest three empirical signatures of such a process of constructivist conceptual development: (1) learning proceeds in orderly conceptual progressions. (2) Sequences and timetables are experience-dependent. And (3) prior conceptual knowledge influences the presence and amount of learning. More intriguingly, perhaps, I will cover studies that provide cross-cultural data, data from typically developing children but also those with developmental delay, experimental micro-genetic research, and more. http://www.brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Building, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments
  • Social Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Download Social Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar to my desktop calendar

    May 6, 2016 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Seminar Series. Speaker: Malte Jung, Cornell University. Title: Robots and the Dynamics of Emotions in Teams. http://www.brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Bldg, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Brown Bag Lunch, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Seminars
  • Cognition Seminar Series Download Cognition Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    May 6, 2016 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Seminar Series. Speaker: Ceyda Sayali Brown University. Title: TBA Metcalf Research Bldg, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Seminars
  • Social Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar Download Social Cognitive Science Brown Bag Seminar to my desktop calendar

    May 13, 2016 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Seminar Series. Speaker: Katherine McAuliffe, Boston University. Title: Children’s enforcement of fairness norms. http://www.brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Bldg, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Brown Bag Lunch, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments, Seminars