Calendar of Events

  • CANCELLED - Robert Podesva, Stanford University Download CANCELLED - Robert Podesva, Stanford University to my desktop calendar

    January 28, 2015 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM PLEASE NOTE: THIS TALK HAS BEEN CANCELLED. Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Robert Podesva, Stanford University. Title: The Social and Linguistic Distribution of Creaky Voice (Vocal Fry). Abstract: Creaky voice, or vocal fold vibration characterized by irregular pitch periods, has been noted as a feature of young women’s speech in the media and academic research alike. Media portrayals, in particular, vilify creaky voice and call into question the vocal health of its users. In spite of strong language ideologies surrounding creaky phonation, no study has documented a higher incidence of creak among young women. In this talk, I report on the results of a large-scale acoustic study of creaky voice in conversational speech samples with residents of three communities in Inland California. Results indicate a change in apparent time, such that both young women and young men are leading a change toward creakier phonation; young women additionally show evidence of creaking at higher pitch levels. Notably, creaky voice is also prevalent in the speech of older women. Linguistic factors further constrain the use of creaky voice, encouraging its occurrence, for example, at the ends of phrases and in syllables that do not carry prosodic prominence. In sum, all speakers use creaky voice to some extent, in accordance with the demands of the linguistic system, and the feature is by no means confined to the speech of young women. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments
  • Vishnu Murty, New York University Download Vishnu Murty, New York University to my desktop calendar

    January 29, 2015 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Vishnu Murty, New York University. Title: Motivated Memory: Mesolimbic-Hippocampal interactions during memory encoding. Abstract: Memories are not direct representations of the environment; rather, an individual's goals can influence how experiences are stored into long-term memory. The mesolimbic dopamine system, in particular the ventral tegmental area (VTA), is critical for motivating this adaptive behavior. However, many questions remain as to how this system shapes individuals' representations of their environment. I will present a series of studies using human neuroimaging to investigate how motivational drive facilitates hippocampus-dependent memory encoding and consolidation. Together, these studies support a model by which dynamic interactions amongst the VTA, hippocampus, and neocortex facilitate enriched memory encoding. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments
  • Brice Kuhl, New York University Download Brice Kuhl, New York University to my desktop calendar

    February 2, 2015 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Brice Kuhl, New York University. Title: Decoding competitive remembering. Abstract: Overlap between memories can lead to competition during attempts to remember. This competition is a major cause of forgetting and memory lapses. Thus, successful remembering requires control over memory in order to selectively attend to or favor those memories that are relevant to current behavioral goals. I will describe a series of human fMRI studies that use multivariate decoding methods to understand (a) how competition between memories is expressed in patterns of neural activity (b) how these neural expressions of competition relate to behavioral outcomes and the engagement of cognitive control mechanisms, and (c) fronto-parietal control mechanisms that align reactivated memories with behavioral goals. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments
  • Jeremy Manning, Princeton University Download Jeremy Manning, Princeton University to my desktop calendar

    February 4, 2015 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Jeremy Manning, Princeton University. Title: A neural signature of mental time travel. Abstract: Abstract: What defines our subjective experience of being in a particular moment? How (and why) do we mentally revisit that moment later? A leading hypothesis is that our subjective experiences are defined by a set of internal and external contextual cues. These contextual cues include incoming sensory information, where we are, who we are with, our mood, etc. When we remember past experiences, some of these contextual cues are reactivated in our minds, giving us the feeling of "traveling back in time." This process can also work in reverse: when we happen upon previously experienced contextual cues in the course of our daily lives, we often spontaneously recall the past. For example, hearing a song on the radio on your way to work might remind you of another time you heard that same song years ago, which might in turn dredge up other contextual cues present during that old experience. This deep association between contextual cues and moments in time has become a cornerstone of modern theories of how we remember events from our past. One of the most challenging aspects of studying the role of context in memory is that we do not typically have direct access to peoples' internal representations of context. Instead, we are left to study contextual cues indirectly through their effects on behavior. I will present a series of memory studies aimed at gaining insights into the elusive neural representations of contextual cues that allow us to "bookmark" our autobiographical timelines. Using a variety of brain recording modalities and computational modeling techniques, I will show how we can begin to tease out, manipulate, and examine in detail the neural underpinnings of mental time travel. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments
  • Jane Wang, Northwestern University Download Jane Wang, Northwestern University to my desktop calendar

    February 9, 2015 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Jane Wang, Northwestern University. Title: Toward a cognitive neuroscience of information-based decisions and modeling during learning. Abstract: Learning often requires extensive interaction with the external environment, including complex sequences of decisions regarding how to acquire more information. This is especially true in dynamic or context-dependent settings, in which formulation of learning strategies to guide exploratory decisions allows more effective sampling of information and optimized learning. Although brain systems such as those of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus have been well-studied in decision-making and learning, little is understood about how these systems interact to support strategic decisions during exploratory learning or are disrupted in neuropsychiatric disorders in which problems with decision-making and exploratory learning are salient yet poorly understood symptoms. Resolving these issues poses challenges for conventional cognitive-neuroscience approaches, as it is difficult to isolate information-based decisions in static/passive learning tasks that are commonly employed. In this talk, I discuss recent efforts to merge together models of the information that individuals seek during learning with experimental approaches that allow identification and manipulation of exploratory decisions in order to develop a foundation for the cognitive neuroscience of information-based decisions. This combined modeling and experimental approach allows pinpointing of the interactive neural systems that underlie strategic and information-seeking decisions—decisions that would remain unobservable in more traditional static/passive learning experiments. I will describe results from recent studies in this spirit that have clarified the nature of dynamic changes in hippocampal-prefrontal and striatal-cortical systems during active, exploratory learning. I will also discuss our latest efforts to modulate these same brain systems using noninvasive brain stimulation and characterize how these manipulations produce changes in individuals’ learning abilities. Through the combined approach of information modeling, tight experimental control of active learning, and the measurement or manipulation of brain systems, we can establish much tighter linkages between brain and behavior in both healthy individuals and those afflicted by neuropsychiatric disorders. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments
  • Amitai Shenhav, Princeton University Download Amitai Shenhav, Princeton University to my desktop calendar

    February 12, 2015 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Amitai Shenhav, Princeton University. Title: Surviving in a World of Opportunities: The Cost of Choice and the Value of Control. Abstract: Choices abound in our daily life. Two largely separate bodies of research offer different insight into the process by which we engage with these choices. Research on value-based (cost-benefit) decision-making describes how we evaluate our options, whereas research on cognitive control describes how we exert the necessary cognitive effort to overcome prepotent biases that interfere with the execution our choice (e.g., flankers directing us toward the incorrect response). I will describe three lines of research that demonstrate the value in integrating these two research programs to understand mechanisms and phenomena at their intersection. I will focus in particular on two studies that explore the first line of research, which aims to describe the cognitive effort costs that we associate with the act of making a choice. The first study examines the neural circuits that drive simultaneously positive and aversive experiences of being offered multiple good options (e.g., great graduate schools to attend). The second study explores the costs of considering alternatives to our default option (i.e., the choice we are prepotently biased to make in a given situation). I will end by describing ongoing and future work in my other two lines of research. One of these lines examines the dynamics that occur when prepotent biases/impulses interact with careful cost-benefit decision-making (e.g., weighing the healthiness and tastiness of one’s food options), the other examines how we weigh the costs and benefits of control itself (i.e., how much cognitive effort is worth exerting?). http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Pre-Law, Faculty, Postdocs, Departments
  • Neurology Update, 2015 Download Neurology Update, 2015 to my desktop calendar

    March 28, 2015 7:00 AM - 3:30 PM Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University 222 Richmond Street | Providence, RI 02912 Program Description Neurologic symptoms account for a disproportionately large percentage of primary care office visits and Emergency Department presentations. Stroke, seizure and headache related presentations are seen daily in a busy primary care practice. Gait problems and tremor are more frequently seen as our population ages. Cognitive and memory problems related to dementia and head trauma are ubiquitous. Complicating these trends, we are in the midst of a knowledge explosion that is markedly changing the face of Neurology. Improving the neurologic knowledge base of practitioners, especially those in primary care, will facilitate the successful identification and management of these patients. This CME Neurology Update focuses upon four major topics: 1) stroke, 2) seizure, 3) headache and neuropathic pain, and 4) movement disorders, memory and cognitive impairment. Subspecialists from Brown Neurology and its allied departments of Ophthalmology and Psychiatry will address these topics in a lively format of short presentations, panel discussions, and Q/A. Who Should Attend Physicians specializing in adult primary care, internal medicine, and psychiatry. Geriatricians, physician assistants, nurses, and nurse practitioners are also welcome. Learning Objectives At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to: 1. Describe current stroke care strategies 2. Explain differences among seizure types and their management 3. Identify different types/etiologies of headaches and their management Cancellation Policy Cancellations/substitutions must be made in writing to the Brown CME Office at least two weeks prior to the conference, no later than March 13, 2015. A $25.00 administrative fee will be charged for all refunds (no refunds for “no shows”). There will be no additional charge for substitutions. This conference is subject to change or cancellation. Accreditation This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and The Norman Prince Neurosciences Institute. The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Credit Designation Physicians: The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University designates this live activity for a maximum of 5.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits(TM). Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. AAFP: Application for CME credit has been filed with the American Academy of Family Physicians. Determination of credit is pending. Physician Assistants/Nurse Practitioners: Participants will receive a Certificate of Attendance for up to 5.75 hours. Psychologists: The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University has been approved by the Rhode Island Psychological Association to offer continuing education credits for Psychologists. The Alpert Medical School maintains responsibility for the program. This program is approved for 5.75 Category 1 CE Credit. (Credits available to RI licensed psychologists only). med.brown.edu/cme/brouchure/Neurology2015 Alpert Medical Building NSGP (Neuroscience Graduate Program), Medical School, Open to the Public, Dept: Continuing Medical Education, Dept: Neuroscience, Dept: CLPS, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Faculty, Staff, BioMed: Gerontology, BioMed:DiagnosticImaging, AMS: ConfClinic, AMS: GenSurgery, AMS: ColonRectal, AMS: Pediatric, AMS: SurgeryOrtho, AMS: Trauma, AMS: Urology, AMS: Anesthesiology, BioMed Division Calendars, PsychBehavior, Departments, Health Services

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