Calendar of Events

  • Social Cognitive Brown Bag Series Download Social Cognitive Brown Bag Series to my desktop calendar

    September 19, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Speaker: Andrew E. Monroe, Florida State University Title: Not so motivated after all? Taking a closer look at the process of blame Abstract: Over the past 20 years, moral judgment has typically been described as a motivated process wherein people’s intuitive desire to blame biases information processing and results in a tendency to over-blame. Yet, such a process of blame would be largely maladaptive and incongruent with using blame for everyday social-regulation. By examining how people update moral judgments in response to new information, I contrast the motivated-blame account with a systematic-blame hypothesis. I present new data showing that people carefully attend to causal and mental state information – regardless of its mitigating or exacerbating content – when making and updating blame judgments. This pattern of data sharply contrasts with the motivated blame account, favoring instead the systematic-blame hypothesis. These effects persist across different stimuli modalities, population groups, and are robust against bottom up effects (e.g., cognitive load). While systematic blame best captures everyday moral judgment, I discuss several new studies that highlight potential limits to systematic blaming, including: judging different moral tribes, the influence of emotion, power altering the social expression of blame, and moral beliefs biasing ascriptions of mind. http://clps-scbb.weebly.com/ http://www.brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Departments
  • Cognition Seminar Series Download Cognition Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    September 19, 2014 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM Speaker: Joshua Abbot, UC Berkley Abstract: When people are asked to retrieve members of a category from memory, clusters of semantically related items tend to be retrieved together. A recent article by Hills, Jones and Todd (2012) argues that this pattern reflects a process similar to optimal strategies for foraging for food in patchy spatial environments, with people making a strategic decision to switch away from a cluster of related information as it becomes depleted. We demonstrate that similar behavioral phenomena also emerge from a random walk on a semantic network derived from human word association data. Random walks provide an alternative account of how people search their memory, postulating an undirected rather than a strategic search process. We show that results resembling optimal foraging are produced by random walks when related items are close together in the semantic network. These findings are reminiscent of arguments from the debate on mental imagery, showing how different processes can produce similar results when operating on different representations. http://brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/Events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Departments
  • FYP/QP Presentations Download FYP/QP Presentations to my desktop calendar

    September 23, 2014 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM 4:00 Denise Werchan, Title: Eight-Month-Old Infants Spontaneously Learn and Generalize Hierarchical Rule-Sets. 4:30 Evan Cesanek, Title: Illusion effects on grasping are corrected by online visual and haptic feedback. 5:00 Elena Luchkina, Title: Eighteen-Month-Old Toddlers Prefer to Learn Words From Reliable Speakers. Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, Audience, Departments
  • The Richard B. Millward Colloquium Download The Richard B. Millward Colloquium to my desktop calendar

    September 24, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Speaker: Sharon L. Thompson-Schill, University of Pennsylvania. Title: Costs and benefits of cognitive control Abstract: Prefrontal cortex is a key component of a system that enables us to regulate our thoughts, behaviors and emotions, and impairments in all of these domains can readily be observed when this cognitive control system is compromised. Here, I explore a somewhat less intuitive hypothesis, namely that cognitive control has costs, as well as benefits, for cognition. I will provide evidence from several experiments in which we manipulated frontally-mediated cognitive control processes using noninvasive brain stimulation (transcranial direct current stimulation; TDCS) of prefrontal cortex and observed the consequences for different aspects of cognition. Using this experimental methodology, we demonstrate the costs and benefits of cognitive control for categorization, language production, learning, and creative problem solving. I will suggest that this framework for thinking about cognitive control has important implications for our understanding of cognition in children prior to maturation of prefrontal cortex. http://www.brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments
  • FYP/QP Presentations Download FYP/QP Presentations to my desktop calendar

    September 25, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM 4:00 Ceyda Sayali. Title: Discounting of Monetary Reward by Mental Effort. 4:30 Christine Gamble, Title: Impact of size-contrast illusion on the planning and execution of hand and eye movements. Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, Audience, Departments
  • FYP/QP Presentations Download FYP/QP Presentations to my desktop calendar

    September 26, 2014 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM 4:00 Boyoung Kim, Title: Why social blame is social: Because it follows norms. 4:30 Greg Dachner, Title: Behavioral Dynamics of Alignment in Pedestrian Following. 5:00 Stephen Emet, Title: Negative Polarity Items in Affective Environments. Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, Audience, Departments
  • Roundtable Discussion with Adele Diamond: Improving Executive Function Skill Development among Rhode Island Children - Bridging the Gap Between Science and Practice Download Roundtable Discussion with Adele Diamond: Improving Executive Function Skill Development among Rhode Island Children - Bridging the Gap Between Science and Practice to my desktop calendar

    October 2, 2014 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM Please join Brown faculty, students and RI service-providers in informal conversations about current research and novel service delivery efforts designed to enhance early brain development among high risk Rhode Island children. Speakers will include: Prof. Dima Amso, Department of Cognitive, Linguistic and Psychological Sciences, Director of the Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory on “Socioeconomic Status Influences on Cognitive Development from Infancy through Adolescence" Leslie Gell, Director, Ready to Learn Providence (R2LP), on the partnership between Providence Public Schools and R2LP to bring Mind in the Making, an innovative learning experience on how to foster executive function skills, to parents and educators of young children (ages 4 – 8). Prof. David Sobel, Department of Cognitive, Linguistic and Psychological Sciences on "Children's Metacognitive Awareness of Learning in Museum Settings: A Partnership with the Providence Children's Museum." Aimee Mitchell, Senior Vice President, Director of Head Start, Children’s Friend and Martin Gardiner, Research Associate in Education on “Music Training for Head Start Participants: Harnessing its High Potential for Lasting Impacts on Brain Development” Moderated by Prof. Stephen Buka, Chairman, Brown Department of Epidemiology. Please RSVP to Stephen Buka at Stephen_Buka@brown.edu and provide an email address.   Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Panel Discussions, Dept: CLPS, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Departments
  • Social Cognitive Brown Bag Seminar Series Download Social Cognitive Brown Bag Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    October 3, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Speaker: Nadia Chernyak, Ph.D (Cornell). Brown University (Sobel Lab) & Harvard Graduate School of Education Dr. Chernyak’s research interests include social and cognitive development. Her current research projects include: (1) Ideas about choice across cultures and ages, (2) learning from choices, (3) learning through actions, and (4) how children reason about biology & technology. http://clps-scbb.weebly.com/ http://www.brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Departments
  • Social Cognitive Brown Bag Seminar Series Download Social Cognitive Brown Bag Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    October 10, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Rose McDermott Ph.D (Stanford). Professor of International Relations, Brown University Professor McDermott is the author of three books, a co-editor of two additional volumes, and author of over ninety academic articles across a wide variety of disciplines encompassing topics such as experimentation, emotion and decision making, and the biological and genetic bases of political behavior. http://clps-scbb.weebly.com/ http://www.brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Dept: CLPS, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Departments
  • Gail Heyman, UC, San Diego Download Gail Heyman, UC, San Diego to my desktop calendar

    October 15, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Gail Heyman, University of California, San Diego. Title: Children’s Reasoning about People as Sources of Information Abstract: The capacity to learn from the verbal communication of others creates vast opportunities for learning, but for children to effectively make use of these opportunities they need to be able to assess the reliability of their sources. Recent research has documented that even preschool children can use a wide range of cues to make comparative source reliability judgments. I will present evidence that alongside these capacities there remain substantial vulnerabilities in young children’s reasoning about sources, including difficulties in reasoning about deceptive motives and in making absolute judgments about unreliable sources. Understanding these vulnerabilities can offer insights into the development of children's critical thinking skills. http://www.brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments
  • Social Cognitive Brown Bag Seminar Series Download Social Cognitive Brown Bag Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    October 17, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Chris Baker Ph.D. MIT (Computational Cognitive Science Group) Dr. Baker builds computational models of social cognition and is particularly interested in theory of mind. His research has focused on how people make social inferences using a process called inverse planning, which assumes that people tend to act rationally to achieve their goals, given an environmental and social context. Inverse planning relies on Bayesian inference, a powerful framework for reasoning under uncertainty, to infer the goals and beliefs underlying other people's observed behavior by inverting models of rational planning. http://clps-scbb.weebly.com/ http://www.brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Departments
  • Social Cognitive Brown Bag Seminar Series Download Social Cognitive Brown Bag Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    October 24, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Jennifer Prewitt-Freilino Ph.D (Oklahoma). RISD. Dr. Prewitt-Freilino is RISD’s first full-time professor of psychology. Her research explores the power of social identity and the role norms play in how we think about ourselves, behave, and speak. Her most recent work explores the gendering of language and its link to gender inequality, both in terms of larger language systems as well as how men and women speak in everyday life. In addition, Jennifer has explored the links between narcissism, self-affect, and self-conscious emotions as well as cross-cultural reactions to social identity threats. http://clps-scbb.weebly.com/ http://www.brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Departments
  • Daniel McAdams, Northwestern University Download Daniel McAdams, Northwestern University to my desktop calendar

    October 29, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Daniel McAdams, Northwestern University. Title: The Redemptive Self: How Generative Adults Narrate Their Lives. Abstract: Generativity is an adult's concern for and commitment to promoting the well-being of future generations. Past research has shown that adults who score high on self-report measures of generativity tend to be positively and meaningfully engaged in their families, communities, and societal institutions. But generativity is hard work, involving thankless tasks and long-term commitments to uncertain ends. Accordingly, many highly generative adults construct and draw upon an especially powerful story for their lives to support their generative commitments -- a story I call the redemptive self. The story describes how a gifted protagonist journeys forth into a dangerous world, equipped with moral steadfastness and overcoming adversity on the way to leaving a positive legacy of the self for future generations. I will describe empirical research that links this kind of redemptive life narrative to generative lives, and I will examine cultural variations on the redemptive self that appear in narratives of atonement, recovery, personal emancipation, and upward social mobility. The findings suggest that shaping one's life into a redemptive form may bring with it the benefits of strong societal engagement and enhanced well-being for American adults, even as the story hints at certain cultural shortcomings and limitations. Department of Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences, Friedman Auditorium, 190 Thayer Street. Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments
  • Richard Davidson, University of Wisconsin-Madison Download Richard Davidson, University of Wisconsin-Madison to my desktop calendar

    November 5, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM Michael S. Goodman '74 Memorial Lecture Series. Speaker: Richard Davidson, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Title: Change Your Brain by Transforming Your Mind: Neuroscientific Studies of Meditation. Abstract: This talk will present an overview of studies conducted in our laboratory over the past 6 years on neural changes associated with different forms of meditation. Distinctions among three major forms of meditation practice will be made: Focused Attention; Open Monitoring; and Positive Affect Training. These different forms of meditation have different neural and behavioral effects. From the perspective of Western neuroscience, different forms of meditation can be conceptualized as mental training to promote the regulation of emotion and attention. Data from studies on long-term meditation practitioners as well as those with shorter durations of training will be highlighted. In addition, some longitudinal studies that track changes over time with meditation practice will be reviewed. In addition to the neural changes that have been observed, this talk will also summarize changes that have been found in peripheral biology that may modulate physical health and illness. The central brain circuitry of emotion is especially implicated in peripheral biological changes that have consequences for health. The overall conclusions from these studies is that one can transform the mind through meditation and thereby alter the brain and the periphery in ways that may be beneficial for mental and physical health, and for well-being. Co-Sponsored by the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences and The Contemplative Studies Initiative. Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Colloquia, Open to the Public, Dept: CLPS, First Years, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, For Masters candidates only, For PhD candidates only, Audience, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Faculty, Staff, Postdocs, Departments
  • Social Cognitive Brown Bag Seminar Series Download Social Cognitive Brown Bag Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    November 7, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Nina Mazar Ph.D (Johannes Gutenberg-University. Professor of Marketing, University of Toronto Dr. Mazar investigates consumer behavior and how it deviates from standard economic assumptions. In addition, she studies moral decision-making and its implications for policy. Her research topics range from irrational attraction to free products, to the paradoxes of green behavior, to temptations to be dishonest. http://clps-scbb.weebly.com/ http://www.brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 305 Dept: CLPS, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Departments
  • Social Cognitive Brown Bag Series Download Social Cognitive Brown Bag Series to my desktop calendar

    November 14, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Joachim Krueger Ph.D (Oregon). Professor, Brown University Professor Krueger’s research interests focus on inductive reasoning in social context. This includes the areas of self-perception, intergroup perception and relations, as well as behavior in social dilemmas. He is particularly interested in social projection, which determines how and when people assume that others will behave as they themselves do. He has found that social projection can increase the accuracy of social perception, and make people more willing to cooperate with others. However, social projection also contributes to ingroup favoritism and conflict between groups. http://clps-scbb.weebly.com/ http://www.brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Dept: CLPS, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Departments
  • Social Cognitive Brown Bag Seminar Series Download Social Cognitive Brown Bag Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    December 12, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM Dan Kahan, J.D. (Harvard Law). Professor of Law and Psychology, Yale Law School Professor Kahan’s primary research interests are risk perception, science communication, and the application of decision science to law and policymaking. He is a member of the Cultural Cognition Project, an interdisciplinary team of scholars who use empirical methods to examine the impact of group values on perceptions of risk and related facts. His research has investigated public disagreement over climate change, public reactions to emerging technologies, and conflicting public impressions of scientific consensus. http://clps-scbb.weebly.com/ http://www.brown.edu/Departments/CLPS/events Metcalf Research Laboratory, Room 101, Friedman Auditorium Dept: CLPS, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Departments

Subscribe to our events calendar with our calendar feed: iCal icon

  • For Google Calendar, right-click on the calendar feed icon above, choose 'Copy link address', then visit your Google Calendar page and 'Add by URL.'
  • For iCal/Mac Calendar, right-click on the calendar icon above, choose 'Copy link address', then open iCal and create a 'New Calendar Subscription'. Paste the copied address into the Calendar URL field, and set an Auto-refresh setting of 'Every Day'.