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2006-07 Events History


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September     October     November     December     
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September 15

"Grants and the Humanities"

Crystal Room, Alumnae Hall
2:00-3:30pm

Writing a grant proposal can seem like an intimidating process, but there are many resources on campus to help faculty put together a strong and convincing proposal.

This presentation will introduce faculty to the ins and outs of the grant writing process at Brown. Clyde Briant, the new Vice President for Research, will speak about the mission of his office and his vision for increasing proposal writing assistance to the humanities faculty. Elizabeth Francis, Interim Executive Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations, and Anne Windham, Proposal Coordinator, will explain their roles in assisting faculty with foundation and government grant proposals.

Even faculty with some grant writing experience are encouraged to attend; both government and foundation support is becoming increasingly competitive and difficult to acquire, and faculty should be aware of all the resources available to assist them.

Refreshments will be served.


September 19

"Epic and History, Ancient and Medieval"

Art Gallery, Annmary Brown Memorial
21 Brown Street
4pm

First meeting of this Humanities Research Group "Epic and History, Ancient and Medieval" to discuss broad issues and focus the group's efforts towards a conference in December.

For more information about this research group and its work, visit "Epic and History, Ancient and Medieval."


October 3

"dancesculpture: time-machine
(or: minimalism's stumble)"

007 Lyman Hall
5pm

As the first lecture of the Humanities Research Group "Gesture," André LePecki, Associate Professor in Performance Studies at New York University, will expand choreography's dialogues with visual arts and philosophy, refiguring some assumptions on choreography's political and ontological grounds: stability, presence, visibility and movement. LePecki will analyze two pieces that propose a particularly close dialogue between dance and minimalist sculpture: Simone Forti's "See-Saw" and Ralph Lemon's "Freedom Bus Ride Project."

For more information about this research group, visit Gesture.


October 12

"Epic and History, Ancient and Medieval "

Art Gallery, Annmary Brown Memorial
21 Brown Street
4pm

In this second of four meetings of the "Epic and History, Ancient and Medieval" research group, Kurt Raaflaub, Professor of Classics and History, and Director of the Ancient Studies Program, will be reading from and leading the discussion of his essay, "Epic and History," published in A Companion to Ancient Epic (2005, John Miles Foley, ed.).  This essay covers the question of cross-cultural perspective. For a copy of this essay, please e-mail Kurt_Raaflaub@brown.edu.

For more information about this research group and its work, visit "Epic and History, Ancient and Medieval."


October 23

"Religion and Public Life:
The United States and France Compared"


Portrait Room, Faculty Club
1 Magee Street
5:30-7:00pm

The global resurgence of very public religious movements has challenged one precept deeply imbedded in the practice of Western liberal democracies.  That is the notion that religious leaders should not in their official roles seek to manage the City of Man.  However, in democratic countries, the question of how exactly to separate the secular from the sacred has been a divisive matter. 

Speaker R. Laurence Moore, HA Newman Professor of American Studies from Cornell University, will highlight points of disagreement in “modern” Western formulations of church state relations by comparing the American idea of church state separation with the French ideal, given critical legal formulation in 1905, of laicité.  The two notions operate in different contexts, both cultural and legal, and not surprisingly have different consequences.  He will consider the charge, raised especially by Fundamentalist or Intégriste religious leaders, that Western democracies have created a public order that, despite claims of neutrality, is hostile to religion.

Reception to follow.


October 24

"Modern and Macabre: The Explosion of Death Imagery in the Public Sphere—Mexico, 1790-1880"

Joukowsky Forum, Watson Institute for International Relations
111 Thayer Street
6pm

Speaker Claudio Lomnitz, Director of the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, Columbia University, will offer insights from his most recent book.

Reception to follow.


October 26

"Epic and History, Ancient and Medieval "

Art Gallery, Annmary Brown Memorial
21 Brown Street
4pm

In this third of four meetings of the "Epic and History, Ancient and Medieval" research group, Mary Bachvarova of Willamette University will be speaking on Hittite epic. There will not be an assigned reading but rather a Powerpoint presentation.

For more information about this research group and its work, visit "Epic and History, Ancient and Medieval."


October 26-28

"Freud and the Humanities"

Brown University, various locations

The program will include a scholarly conference, presentation of student work, a film series and concert.

Participants will include Mary Bergstein (Rhode Island School of Design), Anne Cheng (Princeton), Elizabeth Cowie (University of Kent), James Hopkins (King's College, London), Ranjana Khanna (Duke University), Peter Kramer (Brown University), Dominick LaCapra (Cornell University), Tracy McNulty (Cornell University), Scott Spector (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), Lyndsey Stonebridge (University of East Anglia) and others.

For more information, click on Freud and the Humanities.


November 1

"Sound Scraps, Vision Scraps: Paul Celan's Poetic Practice"

Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106
Pembroke Campus
5:00 - 6:00pm

Marjorie Perloff, Professor Emerita of English at Stanford University, delivers this year's Reinhard Kuhn Memorial Lecture.

Reception to follow.


November 2

Lecturer: Marjorie Garber, Harvard University

Brown Hillel, Glenn and Darcy Weiner Center
80 Brown Street
4:00pm

2006-07 Graduate Student Lecture
English Department

Reception to follow.


November 6

"What do Gay Men Want? Sex, Risk and the Subjective Life of Male Homosexuality"

Brown Hillel, Glenn and Darcy Weiner Center
80 Brown Street
5:00pm

David Halperin, University of Michigan
WH Auden Collegiate Professor of the History and Theory of Sexuality and Professor of English


November 6

"Politics in Indian Country"

MacMillan 117
Thayer and George Streets
7:00pm

Donald L. Fixico, Arizona State University
Prof. Fixico, a Shawnee, Sac & Fox, Muscogee Creek and Oklahoma Seminole, will offer the convocation for the Native American History Series 2006-07.


November 9

"How Cancer Crossed the Color Line: Race and Disease in America"

Smith-Buonanno Room 106
Pembroke Campus
4:00pm

Keith Wailoo, Rutgers University
Department of History and the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research


November 7-13

"Dance, Dinner, and Discourse: Exploring South Asia through the Lens of Politics"

Various locations
Brown University

South Asian Identity Week
For more information on specific events, visit SAIW.


November 9

"The Image Economy"

Brown Hillel, Glenn and Darcy Weiner Center
80 Brown Street
5:30 - 6:30pm

Susan Bielstein, University of Chicago Press
Executive Editor for Art, Architecture, Film and Classical Studies
and author of Permissions, a Survival Guide: Blunt Talk about Art as Intellectual Property. Ms. Bielstein will introduce a new venture in intellectual property activism that specifically addresses the endangered public domain of visual imagery. 

With the assistance of Stanford law professor Lawrence Lessig and others, Ms. Bielstein has just established a Center for the Study of the Image Economy.  The purpose of the Center is to ensure that visual images of works in the public domain are freely available for copying and publication by anyone. The Center offers legal tools and consultation, database research and coordination, and educational programs for intellectual-property gatekeepers at universities, archives, publishing houses, and museums that are designed to explore and clarify the legal status of reproduction images of art, architecture, and other kinds of physical objects. 

This informal talk should be of interest to scholars (especially in the humanities and social sciences) who rely on visual images in their work as well as to attorneys, librarians, archivists, students, artists, and museum professionals.


November 12-14

"The Jerusalem Perspective: 150 Years of Archaeological Research"

Various locations
Brown University

Convener: Katharina Galor, Visiting Assistant Professor
Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
Click for complete conference details.


November 15

"Moral/Political Theory Aspects of the Conflict"

Faunce Hall, Petteruti Lounge
4:00pm

Sari Nusseibeh, President of University of Al-Quds

Many moral problems are raised in the context of the Israel-Palestinian conflict -— such as suicide attacks, targeted assassination, the use of violence, carrying out and resisting occupation, conflicting rights between the two parties as well as within the context of one party only (e.g. right of return vs. right to be free). This presentation will point out some of these problems and will try to suggest solutions.

Reception to follow.


November 15

"What Literature Knows, or, Calvino's Non-Knowledge"


Rochambeau House
84 Prospect Street
5:00pm

Barbara Spackman, University of California Berkeley
Professor of Italian Studies and Comparative Literature and holder of the Giovanni and Ruth Elizabeth Cecchitti Chair in Italian Literature, Prof. Spackman works on 19th and 20th century Italian literature and culture, with special interests in decadence, the cultural production of the fascist period, feminist theory, travel writing and Italian Orientalism.


November 12-19

"Beyond Paradise: Demystifying Southeast Asia"

Various locations
Brown University

Student activities to celebrate Southeast Asian Week 2006.


November 16

"What is a Book (in the Age of Digital Publishing)?"

Brown Hillel, Glenn and Darcy Weiner Center
80 Brown Street
5:30 - 6:30pm

Susan Bielstein, University of Chicago Press
Executive Editor for Art, Architecture, Film and Classical Studies
and author of Permissions, a Survival Guide: Blunt Talk about Art as Intellectual Property


November 16

"Memory in Oral Traditions: The Cognitive Psychology of Epic, Ballads, and Counting-Out Rhymes"

Annmary Brown Memorial
21 Brown Street
4:00 - 5:30pm

David Rubin, Duke University
Professor of Psychological Brain Sciences 
As part of the Humanities Research Group "Epic and History, Ancient and Medieval," guest speaker Prof. Rubin will be delivering a Powerpoint talk on memory and orality; two very short papers are available for reading in advance.

For <pdf> copies of these papers, click here: Paper 1, Paper 2.


November--all month

"The Ties that Bind: Strengthening the Connections that Shape Our Community"

Various locations
Brown University

Asian/Asian-American History Month
For more information on specific events, visit AAHM.


December 1-3

"Epic and Heroic" Conference
A Faith and Frederick Sandstrom Conference in Ancient Studies

Inn at Brown
101 Thayer Street
Brown University


This conference is the culmination of the work done by the "Epic and History, Ancient and Medieval" Humanities Research Group sponsored by the Cogut Center. Numerous speakers on a variety of topics. For a complete schedule of talks, click here.


December 6

"Knowledge is the Beginning"

Smith-Buonanno 106
8pm

A free screening of the International Emmy Award-winning documentary. This is the story of the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, where young Arab and Israeli musicians perform side by side. The film illustrates how prejudices are overcome during rehearsals, concerts and the celebrations afterwards. It also demonstrates the problems that arise occasionally and how music can help people from different points of view find common ground. For Daniel Barenboim and the late Edward Said, co-founders of the ensemble, the orchestra is a symbol of what could be achieved in the Middle East.

Special guest Mariam Said, widow of orchestra co-founder Edward Said, will provide commentary after the film.

This screening is the first event preparatory to the arrival and residency of Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra here at Brown, starting December 14.


December 14-16

"Listen to the World!"
Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra

Various locations
Brown University and Veterans Memorial Auditorium

Brown University President Ruth Simmons and the Cogut Center for the Humanities are pleased to announce this historic first visit to, and performance in, Providence by the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra and their music director, Daniel Barenboim.

Campus conversations and open rehearsals on Brown campus, as well as a concert performance at the Veterans Memorial Auditorium.

For detailed schedule and ticket information, click here.


January 29

"Critique and Disciplinarity: Foucault via Kant"

Smith-Buonanno 106
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
5pm

Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley

Prof. Butler will speak as part of the Pembroke Center's 25th Anniversary Lecture Series, "The Future of Critique."

Reception to follow.


January 30

"Hannah Arendt and the End of the Nation-State?"

List Art Center, Room 120
64 College Street
Brown University
5pm

Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley

Prof. Butler will speak as part of the Cogut Center's ongoing Hannah Arendt Seminar series which is devoted to topics involving the humanities, feminist and gender studies and international studies.

Reception to follow.


February 1

"Race and Science: New Challenges to an Old Problem"

Smith-Buonanno 106
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
4:00 pm

Evelynn Hammonds, Professor of the History of Science and of African and African-American Studies; Senior Vice Provost for Faculty Development and Diversity, Harvard University

This is the second in the three-part lecture series "The History of Race in Medicine and Public Health." Professor Hammonds is the author of "Childhood's Deadly Scourge: The Campaign to Control Diptheria in New York City, 1880-1930" (Johns Hopkins, 2002). She is also the author of numerous articles on race and gender in the history of medicine, many of which address the importance of history in understanding the contemporary debate over race.

Her "MIT Reader on Race and Gender in Society," co-authored with Rebecca Herzig, is forthcoming from MIT Press. She is currently at work on "The Logic of Difference: A History of Race in Science and Medicine in the United States, 1850-1990."


February 6

"Emancipation and Authoritarianism: The Contradictory Legacy of the Haitian Revolution"

Joukowsky Forum
Watson Institute for International Studies
Brown University
4:00 pm

Robert Fatton, Jr., the Julia A. Cooper Professor of Politics, University of Virginia, is the author of several books including Haiti's Predatory Republic: The Unending Transition to Democracy."

This lecture is one of several events to be put on by the Students of Caribbean Ancestry (SOCA).


February 23

"Beyond 'Art' and 'Science': Maria Sybilla Merian's Crafting of New World Nature"

Annmary Brown Memorial
21 Brown Street
Brown University
3:30 - 5:00 pm

Janice L. Neri, Department of Art, Boise State University, will speak as part of the Humanities Research Group, Nature's Disciplines. Janice Neri’s current book project, The Insect and the Image: Visualizing Nature in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1700, traces the history of insect illustration as a means of exploring how concepts of truth and accuracy in visual images were established and sustained among scientific and artistic communities between 1500 and 1700. Her publications include, "From Insect to Icon: Joris Hoefnagel and the 'Screened Objects' of the Natural World," in Ways of Knowing: Ten Interdisciplinary Essays, edited by Mary Lindenmann (Boston and Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2004).


February 25

"From Gaspipes to Websites"
Audio Documentary Launch

John Hay Library
20 Prospect Street
Brown University
2:00 - 5:00 pm

Alumni, radio fans and members of the Brown Student Radio Project will meet for a public reception and the launch of a new audio documentary about Brown radio. The exhibit traces the founding of The Brown Network in 1936, the growing involvement of Pembroke women during and after World War II, the transition from AM to FM in the 1960s, and the concomitant change from big band music to rock 'n' roll. These stories are told through a combination of documents and photographs, audio clips of interviews, memorabilia from the studios and historic radios from a private collector.

Guests may pick up a free CD of the documentary at the exhibit, while supplies last. Once the exhibit opens, interested parties will be able to listen in Providence public libraries, for free online in the iTunes stores and at the WBRU/BSR alumni website at http://bsrserv.bsrlive.com/alumni.


February 25

"The Importance of College Radio"
Panel Discussion

Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
7:00 pm

WBRU/BSR alumni, current students and members of the Brown Student Radio Project will present a panel discussion. Panelists include Peter Tannewald, '64; Don Berns, '69; Dan Oppenheim, '98; and Rita Cidre (General Manager, WBRU), '07 and Jason Sigal (General Managers, BSR), '07. Over its history, radio has proven one of the most flexible of media, constantly reinventing itself, and that flexibility becomes more interesting in a changing media world. The panel will look at why and how radio continues to play a role in our daily lives by talking to practitioners and scholars who consider radio programming and radio structure.


February 26

"Taste Dissonance Flavor Escape"

Lyman Hall, Room 007
Lincoln Field
Brown University
5:00 pm

Fred Moten
Associate Professor of English and American Studies and Ethnicity, University of Southern California

This paper is presented as part of the Humanities Research Group "Gesture" and is an extended meditation on a photograph of a young nude black girl attributed to Thomas Eakins that takes up the questions concerning movement, posing, gesture and theatricality in their relation to music and cinema all in the interest of providing something like a preface to, or some hyperbolic liner notes for, a solo by Miles Davis.

Moten is the author of In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition (Minnesota 2003), which re-theorizes black aesthetic from an aural rather than visual stance. He is currently working on a "sequel" to In the Break titled Stolen Life.


March 1

"Almost Perfect Machinery: Racial and Sexual Politics in the American Medical Association, 1850-1900"

Smith-Buonanno, Room 106
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
4:00 pm

Doug Haynes
Associate Professor of History, University of California, Irvine

This is the third in the three-part lecture series "The History of Race in Medicine and Public Health." Prof. Haynes is author of Imperical Medicine: Patrick Manson and the Conquest of Tropical Disease, 1844-1923. His academic interests include Modern Britain, medicine and science in Europe and the United States in the 19th and 20th century; Africa-American Studies and Global Cultures.


March 5

"Theoretical Pluralism and the Science of Human Behavior"

Smith-Buonanno, Room 106
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
4:00 pm

Helen Longino
Professor of Philosophy, Stanford University

Prof. Longino's areas of specialty include the philosophy of science, social epistemology, and feminist philosophy. Originally a student of literature, Longino pursued graduate study in logic and the philosophy of language. In her current research, Longino focuses on, as she puts it, “the relations of social and cognitive values in the sciences, the epistemological challenges of scientific pluralism, the philosophical character of feminist epistemologies, and the development of a social approach to scientific knowledge.”


March 5

"Behold this Face: Frederick Douglass, Sarah Winnemucca and the Ethical Command"

Faunce House, Petteruti Lounge
Main Green
Brown University
5:30 pm

Linda Bolton
Associate Professor of English, University of Iowa

This is the first of three talks in the Mellon Graduate Workshop on Aesthetics and Ethics for Spring 2007. Professor Bolton is the author of Facing the Other: Ethical Disruption and the American Mind (Horizons in Theory and American Culture Series, Louisiana State University Press, 2004), which was nominated for the MLA First Book Award in 2005.  Professor Bolton has also authored numerous articles and participated in exhibitions on memory and slavery in American literature and history.


March 6

"War in the Thought of Hannah Arendt"

Joukowsky Forum, Watson Institute for International Studies
111 Thayer Street
Brown University
4:00 - 6:00 pm

Patricia Owens
Department Lecturer in Strategic Studies in the Department of Politics and International Relations, and Seton Watson Research Fellow in International Relations, Oriel College, University of Oxford.

Prof. Owens is author of Between War and Politics: International Relations and the Thought of Hannah Arendt (OUP, 2007) and will speak as part of the ongoing Hannah Arendt Seminars.


until March 9

"From Gaspipes to Websites: Radio at Brown 1936-2006"
Exhibit

John Hay Library, Lownes Room
20 Prospect Street
Brown University
Monday - Friday, 9:00 am - 5:00 pm

As part of the Brown Student Radio Project, this exhibit will celebrate 70 years of Brown college radio, from the dorm room experiment that started it all to the 1960s FM revolution to the students behind the stations today.


March 14

"Israel's Memory of the Holocaust and the Israeli Arab Conflict"

Wilson Hall, Room 101
Main Green
Brown University
8:00 pm

Idith Zertal
Professor of Contemporary History, Institute of Jewish Studies, University of Basel, Switzerland

Prof. Zertal is an Israeli historian and essayist, the author of many books and articles on Jewish, Zionist and Israeli history. She has taught history and cultural studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya. She has been a visiting professor at the University of Chicago and at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris, and senior research fellow at research institutes in the United States, Europe and Israel.


March 21

"The Penny and the Well: A Quarter Mile Along--20 Years as a Book Reviewer"

Hillel Foundation
The Glenn and Darcy Weiner Center
80 Brown Street
Brown University
6:30 pm

Richard Eder

Richard Eder was a foreign correspondent, a film reviewer and drama critic for The New York Times for 20 years. He later became book critic for the Los Angeles Times, winning a Pulitzer and the National Book Critics Circle annual citation. Now he writes book reviews for both Times newspapers and the Boston Globe.


April 3

"Die Tausend Augen des Dr. Mabuse"
(The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse)

List Art Center, Room 120
64 College Street
Brown University
6:00 - 7:30 pm

Free screening of a little-seen cult classic, Die Tausend Augen des Dr. Mabuse was the last film ever made by the great Fritz Lang (Metropolis, M, The Big Heat). This fascinating thriller combines elements of film noir, horror, and science fiction. Gert Frobe (Goldfinger) stars as police commissioner Kras, trying to uncover the sinister secret of the mysterious Hotel Luxor, ground zero for a massive crime wave. The crimes show all the hallmarks of evil genius Dr. Mabuse--but he died 30 years ago!

In German with English sub-titles.


April 4

"Anxious Cinema:  Surveillance as Narrative Form"

Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum
111 Thayer Street
Brown University
7:30 - 9:00 pm

Thomas Y. Levin
Associate Professor of German, Princeton University

Prof. Levin's research interests range from the history of aesthetic theory and Frankfurt School cultural theory to the history and theory of media (archaeologies of vision, Early German Cinema, Weimar Cinema, New German Cinema, rhetoric of new media).


April 5

"Watching Watching: Surveillant Intermediality in Fritz Lang's The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse

Watson Institute, McKinney Room
111 Thayer Street
Brown University
12:00 - 2:00 pm

Thomas Y. Levin
Associate Professor of German, Princeton University

As a follow-up to his lecture of April 4, Prof. Levin will do a close-reading of Fritz Lang's 1960 film classic, The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse (" Die Tausend Augen des Doktor Mabuse "). It is strongly suggested that registrants view the film (see listing on April 3) before attending the seminar.

Seminar seating is limited to 25; pre-registration is required. Contact Humanities_Center@brown.edu.

Lunch will be provided.


April 5

"Politics of the Medical Discourse and the Future of Intersex Identity"

Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
7:00 - 9:00 pm

Emi Koyama

Ms. Koyama is the director of Intersex Initiative. This is the convocation for the many student-run events and activities of "Ellipses...The Space Between," LGBTQ Pride Month 2007.


April 5

"Um passaporte Húngaro"(The Hungarian Passport)
2001, 35mm, color, 72 min.

MacMillan Hall, Starr Auditorium, Room 117
Manning Walk
Brown University
7:30 -9:00 pm

Sandra Kogut

This film, in Portuguese, French, and Hungarian with English subtitles, chronicles Brazilian director Sandra Kogut's frustrating and often hysterical attempts to jump through the bureaucratic hoops necessary for her to obtain a Hungarian passport. On the way, she explores a painful family history of forced emigration and a hidden legacy of anti-Semitism as she confronts some essential questions: What is nationality? What is a passport for? What should we do with our heritage? How do we construct our history and our own identity?

The screening will be followed by a discussion with the director.


April 6

"The Foreign and the Familiar: Selected Moments in Video and Film"

Watson Institute, McKinney Room
111 Thayer Street
Brown University
12:00 - 2:00 pm

Sandra Kogut

This seminar will examine the complex interweavings of documentary and fiction in selected short works by Sandra Kogut. Despite the seeming heterogeneity of a prolific output that ranges from her early prize-winning works in experimental video and installation art (in Brazil, USA, Japan, Africa and the Soviet Union) to films shot in the poor neighborhoods of Rio de Janeiro and in a remote region of the Pyrenees in France, to more recent commissions such as a study of visitors at the Musée D'Orsay in Paris, there is a consistent focus and an equally sustained refusal of classical generic conventions that mark Kogut's fascinating ouevre. This will emerge over the course of the seminar in which the filmmaker will screen and discuss a number of short works (all with English subtitles).

Seminar seating is limited to 25; pre-registration is required.
Contact Humanities_Center@brown.edu.

Lunch will be provided.


April 9

"Instrumental Reason and Aesthetics in History"

Faunce House, Petteruti Lounge
Main Green
Brown University
5:30 pm

Timothy Reiss
Professor of Comparative Literature, New York University

Timothy Reiss is a leading scholar of early Modern as well as Enlightenment European intellectual history, philosophy and literature, as well as Modernism, postcolonial Caribbean literature and culture, and cultural exchange in the Americas. This lecture is presented by the Mellon Graduate Workshop on Aesthetics and Ethics.

A reception will follow.


April 9

Inaugural Invitational Lecture on the Humanities

Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 109
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
5:00 - 6:30 pm

Ruth J. Simmons
President, Brown University
Professor of Comparative Literature and Africana Studies

The Cogut Center for the Humanities is honored to announce that President Ruth Simmons will offer the inaugural Invitational Lecture in the Humanities. In this annual event, a prominent member of the Brown University faculty will consider pressing issues in the humanities, issues of importance to scholarship and to the world at large. This occasion will give the university and the community at large an opportunity to learn from our most distinguished colleagues, many of whom have more regular opportunities to speak off campus than at Brown.

Free and open to the public. A reception will follow.


April 9

"Guantanamo and Beyond - US Lawlessness in the 'War on Terror'"

Barus & Holley, Room 166
184 Hope Street
Brown University
7:00 pm

Jumana Musa
Advocacy Director for Domestic Human Rights and International Justice, Amnesty International

Jumana Musa is a human rights attorney and activist. In her current position at Amnesty International she addresses the domestic and international impact of the Bush administration's "war on terror" on human rights. She has also served as Amnesty International's legal observer at military commission proceedings at the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Part of Brown Amnesty International's "The America I Believe In" events.


April 10

"Ghosts of Abu Ghraib"

Smith-Buonanno 106
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
7:30 pm

Screening of Brown alumna Rory Kennedy's 2007 film, Ghosts of Abu Ghraib. An examination of the prisoner abuse scandal involving U.S. soldiers and detainees at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison in the fall of 2003. Part of Brown Amnesty International's "The America I Believe In" events.


April 12

"A Conversation with Olga Neuwirth"

Orwig Music Building, Room 109
1 Young Orchard Avenue
Brown University
10:30am - 12 noon

Olga Neuwirth

Composer Olga Neuwirth will discuss avant-garde opera, the state of operatic composition and production in Europe and the US, and the role of opera studies in the opera world.

In 2003 the world premiere of the Neuwirth's opera "Lost Highway," based on the film by David Lynch, was performed in Neuwirth's native Austria.  The US premiere was in February 2007 at Oberlin College and it was recently performed at the Miller Theatre at Columbia University in New York City.


April 12

"Recuento de Nuestro Moviemiento: Transcending, Living and Remembering Borders"

Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
7:00 pm

Natalia Almada

Filmmaker and RISD graduate, Natalia Almada is the founder of Altamura Films, an independent documentary production company based in New York and Mexico. This talk is the convocation of a week of student activities and events celebrating Semana Chicana.


April 16

"Migratory Aesthetics: Video and Migration"

Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
4:00 - 5:30 pm

Mieke Bal
Professor, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences

A well-known cultural analyst and theorist, Bal’s areas of interest include literary theory, semiotics, visual art, cultural studies, postcolonial theory, feminist theory, French, the Hebrew Bible, the seventeenth century and contemporary culture. She has recently embarked on a series of projects in filmmaking and video art.


April 16

"FRONTLINE: The Torture Question"

Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
7:00 pm

Screening of the 2005 Emmy Award winning FRONTLINE documentary. The film crew made the perilous journey to the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, accompanying 50 detainees. The Torture Question provides the context for understanding how the rules were confused, how lines of authority were blurred and what happens when the authorization of "coercive interrogation" makes it way into the battle zone. Part of Brown Amnesty International's "The America I Believe In" events.


April 17

"The Future of Social and Cultural Critique" Colloquium

Alumnae Hall, Crystal Room
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
1:30 pm

"What is critique? ...Between the high Kantian enterprise and the little polemical professional activities that are called critique, it seems to me that there has been in the modern Western world...a certain way of thinking, speaking and acting, a certain relationship to what exists, to what one knows, to what one does, a relationship to society, to culture and also a relationship to others that we could call, let's say, the critical attitude." --Michel Foucault

Speakers: Srinivas Aravamudan, Research Fellow, John Carter Brown Library and Professor of English, Duke University; Talal Asad, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, City University of New York Graduate Center; Wendy Brown, Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley; and Joan Wallach Scott, Harold F. Linder Professor of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study


April 18

"Rachel Carson Was Right"

MacMillan Hall, Room 117
Manning Walk
Brown University
4:00 - 6:00 pm

Dianne Dumanoski and Julia Brody

Dianne Dumanoski is the co-author of Our Stolen Future, which continues the story begun by Carson in Silent Spring. Dumanoski and her co-authors describe how a wide range of synthetic chemicals can disrupt delicate hormonal systems. Julia Brody is the Executive Director of Silent Spring Institute, a non-profit scientific research organization dedicated to identifying links between the environment and women's health. Part of the celebration of Rachel Carson's 100th Birthday.


April 19

"The Future of Critique in Science and Technology" Colloquium

Alumnae Hall, Crystal Room
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
2:00 pm

"What is critique? ...Between the high Kantian enterprise and the little polemical professional activities that are called critique, it seems to me that there has been in the modern Western world...a certain way of thinking, speaking and acting, a certain relationship to what exists, to what one knows, to what one does, a relationship to society, to culture and also a relationship to others that we could call, let's say, the critical attitude." --Michel Foucault

Speakers: Wendy Chun, Associate Professor of Modern Culture and Media, Brown University; Anne Fausto-Sterling, Professor of Biology and Gender Studies, Brown University; Elizabeth Wilson, ARC Australian Research Fellow, University of New South Wales.


April 20

"Balkan Literatures of Dissent" Conference

Vartan Gregorian Quad Library and Lounge
101 Thayer Street
Brown University
10:00 am - 7:30 pm

The description of the Balkans as the "Powder Keg" of Europe has often shaped both indigenous and western perceptions of the region's history and has had a lasting impact on the literary and artistic production in the region. The Bosnian and Kosovo conflicts in the 1990s heightened the Western view of the Balkans as a historical locus of conflict. What is often neglected in the attempt to provide an overarching theory of the 'Balkan/Powder Keg' phenomenon is, in fact, the response of writers in times of conflict or under the rule authoritarian regimes. This conference seeks to discuss works written under, and informed by, specific historical coordinates.

Guest speakers include Kostis Kornetis, European University Institute (Florence); Gail Holst-Warhaft, Cornell University; George Syrimis, Yale University; Tatjana Aleksic, Rutgers University; Dusan Bjelic, University of Southern Maine; John Cox, Wheeling Jesuit University; Vangelis Calotychos, Columbia University; Vojislava Filipcevic, Columbia University; and Angelina Ilieva, University of Chicago.


April 23

"Prisons Beyond The Law: An Examination of Post-9/11 Detentions – Where We've Been, Where We're Going"

List Art Center, Room 120
64 College Street
Brown University
7:00 pm

Joseph Margulies
Professor of Law, Northwestern University

Prof. Margulies was lead counsel in the case of Rasul v. Bush, which concerned the holding of detainees at Guantanamo Bay. He is the author of Guantanamo and the Abuse of Presidential Power. Prof. Margulies will speak as part of Brown Amnesty International's "The America I Believe In" events.


April 23

"Queerness as Virtuosity, Queerness as Failure"

Salomon Hall, Room 001
Main Green
Brown University
7:00 pm

José Esteban Muñoz
Chair of the Department of Performance Studies
Tisch School of the Arts, New York University

Prof. Muñoz is the author of Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics (1999) and the forthcoming volumes, Cruising Utopia and Feeling Brown. This lecture is part of "Ellipses...The Space Between," LGBTQ Pride Month 2007.


April 24

"Anatomy, Identity and the Future of Normal"

Smith-Buonanno, Room 106
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
7:00 pm

Alice Dreger
Professor, Medical Humanities and Bioethics Program
Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University

Prof. Dreger is a medical humanist, faculty member and writer who works with affected adults, parents and clinicians to improve the medical and social treatment of people born with socially-challenging bodies. This lecture is part of "Ellipses...The Space Between," LGBTQ Pride Month 2007.


April 25

"Charcot, Hysteria, and Hypnosis: A Constant Source of Inspiration for Literature"

Wilson Hall, Room 102
Main Green
Brown University
5:00 pm

Peter Koehler, MD
Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, The Netherlands

In addition to his medical training as a neurologist, Peter Koehler received his PhD in the history of medicine. He practices neurology at the Atrium Medical Center in Heerlen. Among many other academic activities, he is co-editor of the Journal of the History of the Neurosciences.

In 2006, Koehler received the Lawrence C. McHenry Award from the American Academy of Neurology for his research into historical neurology. He has extensively studied the history of the largest neurological handbook, Vinken & Bruyn’s Handbook of Clinical Neurology.


April 25

"Race, Immigration and the War on Terror"

MacMillan Hall, Starr Auditorium, Room 117
Manning Walk
Brown University
7:00 pm

Tram Nguyen
Executive Editor of ColorLines Magazine

Tram Nguyen is an award-winning writer and editor with a particular interest in race, immigration and organizing. Her writing has appeared in many journals and periodicals and her extensive coverage of civil liberties earned her a New California Media Award in 2003. Tram's book, We Are All Suspects Now: Untold Stories From Immigrant Communities After 9/11 (Beacon) was released in September 2005. Tram will speak as part of Brown Amnesty International's "The America I Believe In" events.


April 26

“A Novel in which Nothing Happens: Fontane’s Der Stechlin and Literary Friendship”

Faunce Hall, Petteruti Lounge
Main Green
Brown University
12:00 noon - 2:00 pm

Martha Nussbaum
Professor of Law, University of Chicago

This is the third of three talks in the Mellon Graduate Workshop on Aesthetics and Ethics for Spring 2007. Professor Nussbaum, Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago, approaches questions of ethics in disciplines as wide ranging as philosophy, literature and law in Love's Knowledge (1990) and Poetic Justice (1996) to Hiding From Humanity: Disgust, Shame, and the Law (2004) and the recently published Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership (2005), Professor Nussbaum’s work is seminal to the field of aesthetics and ethics.

Seminar seating is limited; pre-registration is required. Contact Tiffany_Villa-Ignacio@brown.edu.

Lunch will be provided.


April 27

"Representing Nature: Agostino Scilla and the Painting of Knowledge in 17th-c. Italy"

Smith-Buonanno Hall, Room 106
Pembroke Campus
Brown University
4:30 pm

Paula Findlen
Professor of History, Stanford University

Presented as part of the Humanities Research Group "Nature's Disciplines." Paula Findlen’s work on the History of Science is founded on the notion that “the most important ways to understand how science, medicine and technology have become so central to contemporary society comes from examining the process by which scientific knowledge emerged.”  She examines “a kind of scientific knowledge that did not have an autonomous existence from other kinds of creative endeavors, but emerged in the context of humanistic approaches to the world.” 


May 26--COMMENCEMENT FORUM

"Studies in Movement: New Technologies for Interactive Performance"

Grant Recital Hall
behind Orwig Music Building, One Young Orchard Avenue
Brown University
10:30 am

Joseph "Butch" Rovan, Associate Professor of Music

Studies in Movement is a new multimedia chamber opera which pays homage to the great French physiologist Etienne-Jules Marey (1830-1904). Marey invented methods to track the beating heart; he developed a rapid-fire camera to capture birds in flight; he photographed human locomotion, breaking down the multiple discrete gestures that compose an act of walking, or jumping, or speaking. His findings, which led to both modern aviation and the modern film industry, ultimately transformed modern vision.

Prof. Rovan's new work, Studies in Movement, is an experimental drama based on Marey¹s unique legacy, the idea for each "study" being inspired by Marey¹s writings, photographs and drawings. The talk will therefore begin by presenting a broad picture of Marey himself and then finish with an overview of the custom technologies created for the performance and examples from the work in progress.