Skip over navigation
Brown Home Brown Home Brown University Cogut Center for the Humanities Brown Home Brown Home Brown University

2013-14 EVENTS CALENDAR


Cogut Center Events
Spring 2014


January 27-28
"Reconsidering Hannah Arendt"

January 27
Hannah Arendt (2012)
Film screening
Markuvitz Auditorium, Sidney Frank Hall
185 Meeting Street
5:30 - 7:30pm

Actress Barbara Sukowa stars in this biopic of influential German-Jewish philosopher and political theorist Hannah Arendt. Arendt's reporting on the 1961 trial of ex-Nazi Adolf Eichmann in The New Yorker—controversial both for her portrayal of Eichmann and the Jewish councils—introduced her now-famous concept of the "banality of evil." Using footage from the actual Eichmann trial and weaving a narrative that spans three countries, director Margarethe von Trotta turns the often invisible passion for thought into immersive, dramatic cinema.

Followed by Q&A with screenwriter Pamela Katz.

January 28
Roundtable discussion
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
12:00 - 1:30pm

With Ariella Azoulay, Comparative Literature; Ted Bogosian, Cogut Center; Bonnie Honig, Modern Culture and Media/ Political Science; Pamela Katz, screenwriter; Adi Ophir, Cogut Center; and Michael Steinberg, Cogut Center.

A copy of the poster.

See a video of the roundtable event.


January 31
"Martin Luther King in Berlin"
Panel discussion
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street

This conversation reflects on Martin Luther King, Jr.'s significant but under-examined 1964 visit to West and East Berlin. King managed to cross into East Berlin without a passport and spoke to immense crowds on both sides of the Berlin wall. He spoke urgently about segregation in the US, the Berlin wall, divided societies worldwide and the importance of emphasizing a "common humanity."

Discussion will be led by Taylor Branch, author of The King Years: Historic Moments in the Civil Rights Movement. Discussants include Tricia Rose, Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA); Michael Steinberg, Cogut Center; and Andre Willis, Visiting Professor, Religious Studies.

Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America and the Cogut Center.

A copy of the poster.


February - Entire Month
"We...the Divan"
Photography exhibit
Pembroke Hall - 1st Floor
172 Meeting Street

This exhibit is the work of Georges Yammine, who joined the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra (WEDO) in 1999 as violinist. In 2008, he began development of his photo project "We...the Divan", while he was travelling with WEDO and Maestro Daniel Barenboim equipped with two instruments: a violin and a camera.

Five years later, We...the Divan was published in book form on the occasion of Maestro Barenboim's 70th birthday. Since 2009, Georges Yammine has been a member of the Qatar Philharmonic Orchestra and works as a freelance photographer.

Visit a photo gallery of this exhibit.


February 5
"Schwanengesang"
Live performance
Granoff Center, Martinos Auditorium
154 Angell Street
8:00 - 9:30pm

Austrian baritone Wolfgang Holzmair and pianist Russell Ryan perform Franz Schubert’s final work, a group of 14 songs published posthumously under the title "Schwanengesang" (Swan song). Not a typical song cycle, the work contains settings of three poets, Ludwig Rellstab (1799-1860), Heinrich Heine (1797-1856) and Johann Gabriel Seidl (1804-1875). Published in early 1829 just a few months after the composer's death, the title (attributed to the publisher, not the composer) refers to the old legend that before it dies, the swan sings the most beautiful song.

Seating is limited. Reservations may be made here.

Visit a photo gallery of this event.


February 12
Creative Medicine Lecture Series
"Discovery, Diagnosis and Dignity: Interpreting Narratives of Health and Justice"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall
172 Meeting Street
5:30 - 7:00pm

Doctors and lawyers both engage in a process of discovery, diagnosis and retelling of the patient or client’s story in order to interpret the “truth” and promote health and justice. In medicine and in law, the professional interpretive process results in fitting the patient’s or the client’s story into a universalized narrative – the diagnosis or the legal claim. But often the patient or client’s own narrative of health or of justice is lost through this narrow technical translation. How can a literary approach to medical and legal narratives help to maintain the dignity of the patient or client’s voice as well as illuminate where health and justice may meet in the telling?

Speaker, Liz Tobin Tyler, JD, MA is a Clinical Assistant Professor of both Family Medicine, and Health Services, Policy and Practice. She is also the co-director of the Scholarly concentration in Advocacy at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

This lecture is part of the 2013-14 Creative Medicine Lecture Series.

A copy of the poster.


February 21
"Prisons of Stone, Word and Flesh: Medieval and Early Modern Captivity"
Symposium
Pembroke Hall
172 Meeting Street

If, following the thought of Michel Foucault and others, the prison is an essentially modern invention, how can we best conceptualize captivity in the time beforehand? Historical records of the medieval and early modern period (~400 - 1800CE) offer countless examples of human bondage, including the capture and detention of prisoners of war and the voluntary submission of hostages, as well as evolving forms of punitive incarceration. During the same time, art and literature are replete with depictions of imprisonment, often employed as a master metaphor for concepts like erotic love or mankind's enslavement to the Devil and the body. Being held against their will even seems to have been something of a rite of passage for numerous medieval and early modern authors (e.g., Marco Polo, François Villon, Charles d'Orléans, Thomas Malory, Cervantes) who found in various forms of captivity the time and inspiration necessary to create some of the most enduring works of western literature.

This symposium brings together scholars from a wide variety of disciplines in order to share new methodological and theoretical approaches to medieval and early modern captivity, and to examine the relationship of captivity to cultural production in the period.

Adam J. Kosto, professor of History, Columbia University, and author of Hostages in the Middle Ages (Oxford University Press, 2012), will be the keynote speaker with his talk "UnLiberty: Towards a Not-So-Grand Unified Theory of Captivity" at 5:30pm at Pembroke Hall 305.

Concurrent panels will run throughout the day in various locations within Pembroke Hall. Please check the conference schedule.

Visit a photo gallery of this event.


April - Entire Month
"My Friend is Mine: The Photography of John Dugdale"
Photography exhibit
Pembroke Hall
172 Meeting Street
Exhibit Hours: Monday - Friday, 8:30am - 5:00pm

How does photography illuminate friendship, not only between human beings, but between objects and things across temporal divides? What does one see or not see when one looks upon things? And what role does photography play in imagining queer love as a historical affect? In the exhibit My Friend is Mine, seventeen classic cyanotypes, toned silver prints and gelatin chloride prints by John Dugdale form the core of a month-long exhibit and one-day symposium that centers on his aesthetics, techniques, and life philosophy.  Indeed, Dugdale’s interest in nineteenth-century photography becomes the starting off point for considering  how alternative, non-digital models of image visualization and production might turn us to an earlier century’s own radical story of photographic emergence, a story which coincides with the quiet acknowledgment of the image as a gift that brings past, present, and future into remarkable queer adjacencies and constellations.

More information on the work of John Dugdale.

A copy of the poster.

A photo gallery from this event.

Co-sponsored by the Creative Arts Council, the Humanities Initiative, the Departments of English and History of Art and Architecture.


April 2
"My Friend is Mine: The Photography of John Dugdale"
Symposium
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
3:30 - 5:30pm

This symposium seeks to (re)turn to photography as a form that continues to engage scholars in the humanistic disciplines, inflecting ethical, aesthetic, and political reflections that testify to a world subject to vision. How can we think about the concepts of gender and sexuality at this moment, and what is the place of photography in queer studies? What forms of attention must be established for dealing with HIV/AIDS on the level of the image?

Photographer John Dugdale, Jonathan Katz (Visual Arts, SUNY/Buffalo), Douglas Nickel (History of Art and Architecture), Stuart Burrows (English), and convener Jacques Khalip (English) address these and other questions related to John Dugdale's work and photography as a medium.

A copy of the poster.

A photo gallery from this event.

A exhibit of John Dugdale's photographs is available for viewing throughout the month of April at Pembroke Hall during office hours. The text from the exhibit.

Co-sponsored by the Creative Arts Council, the Humanities Initiative, the Departments of English and History of Art and Architecture.


April 23
Creative Medicine Lecture Series
"Renovating the Brain"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
5:30 - 7:00pm

Speaker Jon A. Mukand, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at Warren Alpert Medical School, will read a chapter (about an Iraq veteran with a brain injury) from his book-in-progress titled Renovating the Brain. Author of The Man with the Bionic Brain and Other Victories Over Paralysis, he has an MD from the Medical College of Wisconsin, an MA in Creative Writing from Stanford, and a PhD in English literature from Brown. He edited Articulations and Vital Lines, anthologies of poetry and short fiction about medicine, and Rehabilitation for Patients with HIV Disease. Dr. Mukand is also a faculty member at Tufts as well as medical director of the Southern New England Rehabilitation Center.

A copy of the poster.


May 5
Noontime Concert
Live Performance
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street
12:30 - 1:30pm

Pianist and composter Benjamin Nacar '12 will perform a program of JS Bach (French Suite no. 5), L Beethoven/F Liszt (Pastoral Symphony, movement 1), R Strauss (Fűnf Klavierstűcke, op. 3), F Schubert/C Tausig (Marche Militaire).

A copy of the flyer.


Co-sponsored Events
Spring 2014


Aldus Journal of Translation
Aldus is Brown University's Undergraduate Journal of Works in Translation. They publish translations into English from any language, in any genre, from any time, and from any place, as well as essays on the art of translation.


February 19-20
2014 Chinese Film Festival


February 19
Film screening and Q&A with film director
6:00pm
Granoff Center/Martinos Auditorium
Award-winning Hong Kong director Tammy Cheung will be on campus for screenings of two of her films, "Speaking Up" and "Village Middle School."

February 20
Informal conversation with film director
12:00pm
Salomon Hall 203
Tammy Cheung returns to speak about her unique career path, "from prison guard to documentary director."

Film screening and Q&A
6:00pm
Granoff Center/Martinos Auditorium
Screening of "Cheung Chau Diary," a film by several young directors. Filmmaker Tammy Cheung will be available for Q&A after this screening as well. 

Co-sponsored with East Asian Studies


February 25
"Science Writing"
Lecture
Brown/RISD Hillel
80 Brown Street
6:30 - 8:00pm

Part of the 2013-14 Great Brown Nonfiction Writers' Lecture Series, essayist, novelist and physicist Alan Lightman, currently a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), will talk about science writing.

Co-sponsored with English


February 26
"Iranian Rhythms"
Musical talk
Grant Recital Hall
1 Young Orchard Avenue
4:00 - 6:00pm

One of the series of events held with visiting scholar and performer Mohsen Namjoo.

Co-sponsored with Middle East Studies


February 28 - March 1
"Beasts, Monsters and the Fantastic in the Religious Imagination"
2014 Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference
Keynote address delivered by John Lardas Modern, Franklin & Marshall College

Full schedule of talks
Co-sponsored with Religious Studies


March 1
"Cognition, Neuroscience, and the Arts"
All day conference
Smith-Buonanno Hall 106
95 Cushing Street

Speakers: Bevil Conway, Neuroscience and Visual Art, Wellesley College; Alva Noë, Philosophy, University of California/Berkeley; Alan Richardson, English, Boston College; Rebecca Saxe, Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; G. Gabrielle Starr, English, New York University.

Copy of the poster.

Co-sponsored with English


March 12
"Shahram Shabpareh: Honesty and Minor Scale"
Musical talk
Grant Recital Hall
1 Young Orchard Avenue
4:00 - 6:00pm

One of the series of events held with visiting scholar and performer Mohsen Namjoo and legendary Iranian pop star, Shahram Shabpareh, exploring the ongoing legacy of performance, music and ideal.

Co-sponsored with Middle East Studies


March 12
"Immortal Inequalities: Towards a Critique of Futurist Discourse"
English Graduate Student Lecture
Hillel Chapel
5:30pm

Speaker: Donna V. Jones, University of California/Berkeley

Co-sponsored with English


March 14
"Our Imperfect Judiciary: A View from the Newsroom"
Salomon Hall 003
College Green
3:00 - 5:20pm

As part of the 2013-14 Great Brown Nonficition Writers' Lecture Series, retired New York Times reporter William Glaberson will describe how reporters can penetrate government institutions to understand and explain them.

Co-sponsored with English


March 17
"Injustice and the Dubious Value of Anger"
Lecture
Salomon Hall 001
4:00 - 6:00pm

Although everyone is familiar with the damage anger can do in both personal and public life, people tend to think that it is necessary for the pursuit of justice. Isn't it servile not to react with anger to great injustice, whether toward oneself or toward others? On the other hand, recent years have seen three noble and successful freedom movements conducted in a spirit of non-anger: those of Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Nelson Mandela. This lecture, delivered by Martha Nussbaum, Ernst Freund Distinguished Service professor of Law and Ethics, University of Chicago, argues that a close philosophical analysis of the emotion of anger can help us to see why it is of dubious value in both life and political action. 

Co-sponsored with Philosophy


March 18
"Jaffa"
Film screening
Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum
111 Thayer Street
6:00 - 8:00pm

Screening of the film "Jaffa", followed by a conversation with the director, Eyal Sivan. Based on photographic and cinematographic documents, some going back as far as the 19th century, Eyal Sivan's film shows the orange groves at a time when Arab Jaffa was one of Palestine's most populated and thriving cities. This film narrates the visual history of the famous citrus fruit originated in Palestine and known worldwide by centuries as "Jaffa oranges." Jaffa's orange is one of the symbols that helped build the Zionist discourse about Palestine: a "desert we have made bloom."

Co-sponsored with Middle East Studies


April 1
"The Art of Secularism: The Cultural Politics of Modernist Art in Contemporary India"

Lecture
Smith-Buonanno 106
3:00 - 5:00pm

Speaker Karin Zitzewitz, professor of Art, Art History and Design at Michigan State University, addresses the social context of the production of visual culture in India where secularism has increasingly become a site of concern for modernist artists. Discussant is Vazira Zamindar, Religious Studies, Brown.

Co-sponsored with Religious Studies


April 3
"Insect Poetics: Personification and Animacy from Grainger to Dickinson"
Lecture
Smith-Buonanno Hall, 106
95 Cushing Street, Pembroke Campus
5:30pm

Speaker Monique Allewaert, professor of English, University of Wisconsin/Madison, is the author of Ariel’s Ecology:  Personhood and Colonialism in the American Tropics, 1760-1820 (University of Minnesota Press, 2013).

Co-sponsored with English.


April 4-6
"Subjectivity and the System"
Graduate student conference

Keynote speaker Jeremy Varon, author of Bringing the War Home: The Weather Underground, the Red Army Faction, and Revolutionary Violence in the Sixties and Seventies, teaches at the New School.

Co-sponsored with History


April 6-7
"Zionism as a Cultural Movement"

April 6
10:45am
Keynote address
- free and open to the public
"Reflections on Zionism and Writing: Literature in an Ideological Context"
The speaker is Israeli writer Ronit Matalon, author of The Sound of Our Steps (2008) and Uncover Her Face (2005).

April 6
7:30pm
Performance
- free and open to the public
Israeli Classical Music
Chamber music performed by musicians Yossi Arnheim, principal flutist, Israel Philharmonic Orchestra; Lotem Beider, viola, Israel Philharmonic Orchestra; Irena Friedland, piano, Israel; Claire Meghnagi, soprano, Israel. Opening remarks by Oded Zehavi, University of Haifa.

April 7
9:00am
Conference - open to members of the Brown community only
"Ideology, Politics and Culture - The Zionist Case"
Full details on the conference.

All events will take place at Pembroke Hall 305, 172 Meeting Street.

Co-sponsored with Judaic Studies


April 9
"East and West: Low Pitch and High Pitch"
Musical talk
Grant Recital Hall
1 Young Orchard Avenue
4:00 - 6:00pm

One of the series of events held with visiting scholar and performer Mohsen Namjoo, explores western Christian music and eastern Islamic music through an examination of pitch.

Co-sponsored with Middle East Studies


April 10
"Béla Tarr: The Politics of Post-Soviet Cinema"
Colloquium
Pembroke Hall 305
2:00 - 6:00pm

Discussions of the Hungarian film director Béla Tarr typically divide his work into the pre-1989 cinema of a militant filmmaker, grappling with the problems of socialist Hungary, and the post-1989 work of a mature artist, characterized by disenchangement and contemplation. Jacques Rancière's recent book Béla Tarr, the Time After strongly and compellingly rejects this narrative. This colloquium will feature Rancière, returning to this theme, along with András Bálint Kovács, acclaimed scholar of Eastern European cinema and one of the foremost interpreters of Tarr's work, and Eva Cermanova, who is writing a doctoral thesis on Béla Tarr at Princeton University.

Co-sponsored with Comparative Literature


April 24
"Bottom-Up Place Making: Graffiti-Murals and Latino/a Urbanism"
Lectures and demonstration
Hunter Lab (BERT 130), Carmichael Auditorium
85 Waterman Street
6:00 - 9:00pm

Celebrated Los Angeles-based graffiti writers will discuss the practice of painting unsanctioned graffiti-murals as well as related issues such as creative place-making, occupying public space, identity and the role illicit, creative and contestative aesthetics play in the process of neighborhood change. Convened by Cogut Center Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow Stefano Bloch.

Conversation will be followed by a live art painting and reception.

Co-sponsored with the Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America.


May 1-2
"Embedded! Archaeologists and Anthropologists in Modern Landscapes of Conflict"
Workshop
Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum
111 Thayer Street

In recent decades, both archaeologists and anthropologists who work in the precarious war zones in the Middle East have been increasingly drawn into collaborations with western and local military forces via initiatives such as the so-called Human Terrain Systems, adopting military technologies for accessing data about otherwise inaccessible places, and accepting funding from the military for field research. These developments intersect with a cultural/social scientific turn in the US military. Likewise, in recent years, several new archaeological projects have been initiated by western archaeological teams in war-torn countries. This workshop will provide a platform for an open and critical discussion of the ethical implications of archaeological and anthropological fieldwork in conflict zones in the Middle East, collaborations with the military and what it means to be embedded in the military complex in both the contemporary and the historical contexts.

By invitation only.

Co-sponsored with Middle East Studies


May 10
"When you are talking about Iranian Fusion, what are you talking about?"
Concert and reception
Grant Recital Hall
1 Young Orchard Avenue
7:00pm

One of the series of events held with visiting scholar and performer Mohsen Namjoo. The concert will be a fifteen-song exploration of the way in which fusion is revolutionising the ways Iranians address social change through music.

Co-sponsored with Middle East Studies