Skip over navigation
Brown Home Brown Home Brown University Cogut Center for the Humanities Brown Home Brown Home Brown University

2010-11 Events Calendar


Cogut Center Events

September 17
The Theatre of Tadeusz Kantor
Symposium
Pembroke Hall 305
10:00am - 6:00pm

Tadeusz Kantor (1915-1990) was one of the twentieth century’s most innovative visual artists, stage directors, and theoreticians.  The breadth and diversity of his artistic endeavors align him with such diverse artists as Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz (Witkacy), Marcel Duchamp, Vsevelod Meyerhold, Oscar Schlemmer, Antonin Artaud, Jackson Pollock, Jerzy Grotowski, Christo, Allan Kaprow, Peter Brook, or Robert Wilson.  His work with the Cricot 2 company and his theatre manifestos challenged the extant conventions of creating art in post-World War II culture and expanded the boundaries of traditional and nontraditional theatre forms. This all day symposium will focus on Kantor's work with Ludmilla Ryba and Michal Kobialka.

Ms. Ryba was a company member of Kantor's theater company, Cricot 2. She joined the company in 1979 and stayed until 1992, performing in “Wielopole, Wielopole”, “The Machine of Love and Death”, “I Shall Never Return”, “Today is my Birthday”. She was also Kantor’s translator and assisted him during his workshops in Milan (1986) and in Avignon (1990). 

Michal Kobialka is a Professor in the Department of Theatre Arts and Dance at University of Minnesota. He is the author of two books about Tadeusz Kantor: Further On, Nothing ( University of Minnesota Press, 2009) and A Journey Through Other Spaces (University of California Press, 1993).

For a copy of the poster.


October 7
"Black Culture Matters: Black Cultural Debates in a Color Blind Nation" 
Invitational Lecture in the Humanities
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30 - 7:00pm

The debates over the existence, meaning and value of black culture span multiple centuries and disciplines. What is at stake here and how does this matter shape contemporary US society? Tricia Rose, Brown professor and chair of Africana Studies and author of Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk About When We Talk About Hip Hop--and Why It Matters, will address these issues in the Cogut Center Invitational Lecture in the Humanities.

For a copy of the poster.


November 1
"Mère Folle" ("Crazy Mother") 2010, 120 mins., Color, Multi-lingual with English subtitles
Film screening with panel discussion
Metcalf Auditorium/Chace Center, RISD
20 North Main Street
7:00 - 9:00pm

If your mentally ill patient dies, are you to blame?  For Dr. Françoise Davoine, Parisian psychoanalyst, this question becomes disturbingly real as one of her patients, Ariste, dies.  Davoine is abducted and put on trial by mediaeval fools and through the course of one hellish night - across several centuries and countries – must argue her case for exoneration.  

This is the US film premiere of "Mère Folle," based on the 1998 novel of the same name by French psychoanalyst Françoise Davoine. Filmmakers Mieke Bal and Michelle Williams Gamaker will be joined by psychiatrist Christine Montross (Butler Hospital), author of Body of Work: Meditations on Mortality from the Human Anatomy Lab, and Brown faculty member Bernard Reginster (Philosophy) for a post-screening conversation.

This film screening is free and open to the public.

More information on this film.


November 12-13
"Romanticism and the Question of Community"
Colloquium
Pembroke Hall 305

This colloquium will bring together scholars to present research in progress on the principles, practices, experiences, and theories of community in Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment literatures and cultures, with a special emphasis on Romantic literature and thought. The objective will be to locate particular moments in European culture that testify to attempts in the wake of Romanticism to rethink common life. The event is a timely one and its implications will result in establishing engagements with contemporary discussions focused on questions of belonging, cosmopolitanism, citizenship, and national identity.

Co-sponsored by the Departments of English, Modern Culture and Media, German Studies and Comparative Literature.

More information about the speakers and schedule, click here.


November 18-19
"Conversations about Culture and Education in Israel and Palestine" with Nabeel Abboud Ashkar and Lilian Daniel
Fellows' Seminar (invitation only)

November 18
11:00am - 2:00pm

Pembroke Hall 202
172 Meeting Street

Informal conversation meeting with students
November 18
6:30 - 8:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305
172 Meeting Street

"A Conversation about Environmental Issues and Environmental Studies in the Middle East"
Brown-bag session with Lilian Daniel
November 19

12:00 - 1:00pm
Center for Environmental Studies, UEL
135 Angell Street

Nabeel Abboud Ashkar is a member of the West Eastern Divan Orchestra and the Director of two extraordinary music schools in Nazareth and Ramallah.  Supported by the Barenboim-Said Foundations (U.S.A. and Spain) and the Orpheus Music Foundation in Nazareth, these schools offer music training at a very high level to local adolescents, in many cases preparing them for participation in the West Eastern Divan Orchestra or its affiliated youth orchestra, the new Orchestra of Andaluz.  

Lilian Daniel is an environmental scientist who teaches general and interdisciplinary science in Nazareth. She studied at the University of Haifa and is now developing new curricula in science education.


November 30
"Passion, Poetry and Medicine"
Poetry reading and conversation
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30pm

Poet and physician Jack Coulehan is Professor Emeritus of Preventive Medicine and Senior Fellow of the Center for Medical Humanities, Compassionate Care, and Bioethics at Stony Brook University. Until his retirement in 2008, he practiced general internal medicine, directed the ethics and humanities program at Stony Brook School of Medicine, and chaired the ethics case consultation service at University Hospital. Dr. Coulehan's poems and stories have appeared in literary magazines and medical journals in the United States, Canada, and Australia; and his work is widely anthologized. His collections of poetry include The Knitted Glove (1991), First Photographs of Heaven (1994), The Heavenly Ladder (2001), and Medicine Stone (2002).

This lecture is the first in the Creative Physician Series, co-sponsored by the Creative Arts Council, the Department of Emergency Medicine, and the Cogut Center of the Humanities.

For more information on the Creative Physician Series.

For a copy of the poster.


December 12
Samuel Barber's String Quartet, Op. 11
Performance by Providence String Quartet

Dmitri Shostakovich's String Quartet, No. 9
Performance by the CMW Fellows Quartet

Pembroke Hall 305
4:00 - 6:00pm

The performance of the Barber String Quartet will include, for the first time in public performance since 1938, the original final movement.

The Providence String Quartet (PSQ) will perform Samuel Barber's String Quartet, Op. 11. As part of the American Masterpieces grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Quartet is surveying a century of American string quartets (Ives, Barber, Reich, Golijov). This performance of the Barber string quartet includes the final movement which is almost never heard.

PSQ is comprised of Jesse Holstein, violin; Minna Choi, violin; Sara Stalnaker, cello; and Sebastian Ruth, viola. Sebastian Ruth '97, founder of Community MusicWorks (CMW), is the recent recipient of a MacArthur "genius" grant in recognition of his work there. Community MusicWorks introduces urban youth to music through performance and lessons.

The CMW Fellows String Quartet is comprised of the four current participants in the CMW's Fellowship Program.

See the retracted final movement of the Barber performance.

For a copy of the poster.

See photos of the event.


February 16
"The Language of Pain"
Reading and talk
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30pm

David Biro, MD has a medical degree from Columbia University and a doctorate in English Literature from Oxford University. He is an Associate Professor of Dermatology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York. He also teaches in the medical humanities division there, directing a course on medicine and literature.

Dr. Biro’s first book, One Hundred Days: My Unexpected Journey from Doctor to Patient (Pantheon, January 2000), chronicles his experience undergoing a bone marrow transplant for a rare blood disorder.

This lecture is the second in the Creative Physician Series, co-sponsored by the Creative Arts Council, the Department of Emergency Medicine, and the Cogut Center for the Humanities.

For more information on the Creative Physician Series.

For a copy of the poster.


March 21 - April 20
"Reframing Haiti: Art, History and Performativity"
Art exhibition
Pembroke Hall
M-F, 8:30am - 5:00pm

This exhibition will feature four major Haitian artists in residence, Atis Rezistans–Sculptures of the Grand Rue, Myrlande Constant, Gabriel Bien-Aime, and Cogut Center Visiting Fellow Edouard Duval-Carrié. There will be lectures, workshops and seminars on Haitian art, politics and culture. This exhibition, which includes paintings, sculpture, and Vodou flags, will be staged at five venues: the Cogut Center for the Humanities, the Haffenreffer Museum, the Cohen Gallery at the Granoff Center, the Bass Theater at Africana Studies, and Rhode Island School of Design. The Cogut Center exhibit at Pembroke Hall will include the works of Duval-Carrié as well as works centered around the history and politics of Haiti.

This exhibition is a collaboration of Brown University with RISD and Waterloo Gallery in Waterloo, Iowa.

For a look at the schedule of events.

For a copy of the poster.


March 23
"The Novelist in the Hospital: Creative Writing as X-ray"
Reading and talk
Alumnae Hall, Crystal Room
5:30pm

Speaker Nellie Hermann'00 attended Brown University, earning her BA in May of 2000. She received her MFA from Columbia University. Her first novel was The Cure for Grief (Scribner, 2008). She currently works as a writing teacher in the Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University Medical School.

Ms. Hermann will talk about her own trajectory as a writer and teacher of writing in the medical world.  She will read excerpts from her own book as well as examples of her students’ work. The focus of her talk will be to demonstrate how creative writing can be used as a tool for learning and accessing the self, and how this tool can work in the medical context.

This lecture is the third in the Creative Physician Series, co-sponsored by the Creative Arts Council, the Department of Emergency Medicine, and the Cogut Center for the Humanities.

For more information on the Creative Physician Series.

For a copy of the poster.


April 4
"Off/On/In: Configurations of Voice, Body and Apparatus in Silent Film"
Lecture (with film clips)
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30pm

Speaker Gertrud Koch is a Visiting Professor in Humanities at the Cogut Center for Spring 2011 and a Professor of Film Studies at Freie Universität in Berlin. One of the most influential critical thinkers in academia, Prof. Koch has many publications in film and media, feminism, and contemporary art studies.  

Starting with the technical phantasmagoria of the voice as the medium for the image in Marcel L’Herbier’s film L’Inhumaine (France, 1924), Prof. Koch will discuss the competition between the new technical media as they emerge in the 20s and the anthropology of voice, image and the body. The split between voice, body, sound and image creates its own technological imaginary that is grounded in the voice as central medium of creation in the Judeo-Christian culture and tradition. Prof. Koch will follow these aspects in two further exemplifications of the problem: in Marcel Blistènes Étoile sans lumière (France, 1946) with Edith Piaf, and Stanley Donen’s Singing in the Rain (USA, 1952), where the voice finally finds its way back in the body. Starting from the 20s with the experimental fantasies of the medium as technical apparatus Prof. Koch will argue that the re-incorporation of the voice in the body entails a shift from competing media to a holistic Cinema-machine.


April 6
"Medicine and Music: Liberating the Muse"
Reading, performance and conversation
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30pm

Elizabeth Mitchell, Clinical Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Boston Medical Center, is also a singer and songwriter. She will talk about writing music and how it can free thought processes so the brain can make connections and experience feelings not normally available.

For more information on the Creative Physician Series.

For a copy of the poster.


April 11
“William Morris's The Woodpecker Tapestry: Evolution and Utopia”
Sarah Cutts Frerichs Lecture in Victorian Studies
Pembroke Hall 305
5:00pm

Caroline Arscott, Professor of Nineteenth-Century British Art and Head of Research at The Courtauld Institute of Art, London, will lecture on Herbert Spencer’s account of the emergence of psychological life (from physiological existence) in his account of evolution, and on Charles Darwin’s account of sexual selection in relation to evolution to investigate the temporality of The Woodpecker tapestry designed by William Morris in 1885.  The tapestry relates to the tale from Ovid in which Picus is transformed into a woodpecker.  Prof. Arscott will focus on the theme of transformation and raise questions about the temporality implied by the motif and by the verses added to the tapestry by Morris.  A particular relationship between the present and the future is posited.  An argument will be made that this has a bearing on the way that Morris’s tapestry offers a meditation on its own making.  

For more information on the Frerichs Lecture

To view a video of the lecture.

For a copy of the poster.


April 12
"Edward Burne-Jones's King Cophetua and the Beggar Maid (1884): Cryptography, a Pit and the Swing of the Pendulum"
Master Seminar
Brown/RISD Hillel
Meeting Room
80 Brown Street
9:30 - 11:00am

Caroline Arscott (see Sarah Cutts Frerichs Lecture information below) will conduct a Master Seminar for faculty and invited graduate students.

Assigned reading required prior to day of seminar. Those who would like to join this Master Seminar must contact Vanessa Ryan.


April 13
"Art in the Time of Quake & Cholera"
Lecture  
Pembroke Hall 305
5:00pm

Foremost Haitian artist and Distinguished Visiting Fellow Edouard Duval-Carrié will speak on making art in the aftermath of disasters.

For a complete schedule of the Haitian art exhibit, Re-Framing Haitian Art.


April 13-15 and April 20-22
"Iberia :: A Memory of Light and Sound"
Pembroke Hall 003
April 13-15 12-6pm
April 20-22 12-5pm

This installation artwork, Undergraduate Fellow Dylan Nelson's honors thesis, stages an encounter between poems composed by Jews and Muslims (kings, wanderers, viziers, philosophers) living in 11th century Iberia. The politics of this “Taifa” or warring states period supported a wondrous aesthetic culture but ultimately precipitated the erosion of peace between people of the three Abrahamic faiths. The poetry of the period both reflected and consummated subject formation through a confrontation with the alterity of established traditions and experienced social structures.

The work sequences images and videos to the rhythms of a shared poetic verse style, called a Muwashshah. Images blend and merge and are revealed through human interaction. From within the immersive audio environment you might, for example, see the geometric patterns of Islamic wall tiles combined with the grid of an olive tree grove spread over a mountain.

The full experience of the work relies on interaction with an'other' person but visitors should feel welcome to come alone as well, as they might encounter a stranger and learn to work together.

Dylan will be on hand to discuss the work, the history of the period, or installation practice with visitors.

For a copy of the poster.


May 2-13
"Foreign Exchange: Machines for Making Nothing"
Interactive multi-media installation
Pembroke Hall 003
Monday - Friday 1:00-5:00pm

Composer-media artist Samson Young’s "Machines for Making Nothing" is a series of tiny robotic objects that comment on the banality of human-machine interaction. Battery-powered and no larger than the size of a pack of cards, these machines are designed to positively reinforce physical input from humans with almost hypnotic visual or sonic feedback, but otherwise they have no utilitarian value. Young will build as many of these robotic objects as humanly possible during his time spent at Providence. These machines may incorporate objects found at the Brown University Campus Shop.

"Machines for Making Nothing" belongs to a two-part foreign exchange project by Cogut Center Postdoctoral Fellow in International Humanities Betsey Biggs and Samson Young. in which two artists visit each other’s city.

For a copy of the poster.


June 8 and 10
"Le Nozze di Figaro" (The Marriage of Figaro)
Performance
Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Martinos Auditorium
154 Angell Street
8:00pm

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's classic opera buffa performed by members of the University of Cape Town Opera School. This staging offers a uniquely South African interpretation of the traditional master-servant setting. In this imagining, the Count is a young, well-connected South African man who runs a winery in the Western Cape region. Ignoring his own beautiful young wife, he becomes obsessed by the carnal pursuit of his cellar master's fiancee.

Free and open to the public. Seating is limited; please arrive early.
BOTH PERFORMANCES ARE SOLD OUT but there is additional outdoor seating in the Granoff Amphitheater.

For more information on this performance.


Co-Sponsored Events

September 23

"Buried Alive: The Concept of Race in the Biological Sciences and Clinical Medicine - with some Social and Political  Consequences of its Surprising, even Vigorous Revitalization"
Lecture
Smith-Buonanno 106
4:00pm

Prof. Troy Duster, Sociology and the Institute for the History of the Production of Knowledge, New York University and the University of California-Berkeley, will speak in this first event of the 2010-11 Race and Genomics Lecture Series.

Check out the event poster.

Look at the series schedule.


October 1

"The Salt March" (2008; Colour and B/W; 84 min.)
Film screening, followed by discussion with filmmaker
Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum
4:00pm

In 1930, a group of Indians led by a frail, elderly man marched a distance of 241 miles. the marched for salt. Mahatma Gandhi was able to craft an anti-colonial, nationalist movement around the most basic issue of livelihood: the right of Indians to make and consume their own sale. Seventy-seven years later, filmmakers followed the trail of the famous salt march, stopping at the same villages and towns, in search of Gandhi's legacy.

Filmmaker Lalit Vachani will be on hand for a post-screening conversation.


October 5

"Translating The Second Sex"
Panel discussion
Alumnae Hall, Crystal Room
194 Meeting Street
6:00pm

Authors Constance Borde and Sheila Malovany-Chevallier discuss their new translation of Simone de Beauvoir's classic work La Deuxième Sex (1949).

For the lecture poster.


October 7

"Sexual Latitudes: The Erotic Life of Globalization"
Lecture
Smith-Buonanno 106
3:00 - 5:00pm

Ara Wilson, professor of Women's Studies and Cultural Anthropology at Duke University, will explore new forms of sexual politics and transnational advocacy, offering a view of NGOs as modern spaces that both generate and regulate queer sexuality. Prof. Wilson is the author of The Intimate Economies of Bangkok: Tomboys, Tycoons, and Avon Ladies in the Global City (University of California Press).

Part of the 2010-11 "Circulations of Gender in Global Politics" Lecture Series.


October 15-16
"The Human Scale: Bodies, Space, Perception and Interaction"
Graduate Student Symposium
List Art Center 120
5:00pm Keynote address on October 15
9:30am Symposium

Keynote speaker Beatriz Colomina, Professor of Architecture, Princeton University, will present a talk on "Frederick Kiesler: Architecture, Body and Psyche."

This symposium aims to explore the past and ongoing importance of bodily experience--physical, psychological, physiological--in the creation and reception of art.

Please click for schedule.


October 21

"Race and Genomics: Scientists, Publics, and the Politics of Knowledge"
Panel Discussion
Pembroke Hall 305
4:00pm

Speakers include: Alondra Nelson, Sociology and the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, Columbia University; Corey Walker, Africana Studies and the Committee on Science and Technology Studies (STS), Brown University; Lundy Braun, Africana Studies and the Committee on STS, Brown University; Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow Catherine Bliss, Africana Studies and the Committee on STS, Brown University; and Geri Augusto, Public Policy and the Committee on STS, Brown University.

Part of the 2010-11 Race and Genomics Lecture Series.

For the event poster.


October 28

"Historical and Literary Approaches to the 'Final Solution': Saul Friedländer and Jonathan Littell"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30 - 7:30pm

Dominick LaCapra, Bryce and Edith M. Bowmar Professor in Humanistic Studies from Cornell University, will offer the Colver Lecture, as part of the "Violence, Language and Ethics" Lecture Series organized by the Graduate Colloquium of Comparative Literature.

This lecture discusses two recent prize-winning works of epic proportions that have received much attention: Saul Friedländer’s two-volume historical study Nazi Germany and the Jews and Jonathan Littell’s novel Les Bienveillantes (The Kindly Ones), the former of which focuses on victims and the latter on perpetrators of the “Final Solution.”  Prof. LaCapra will provide a critical analysis of Littell’s novel, especially with respect to its seemingly fatalistic mingling of erotic and genocidal motifs and its disavowal or underestimation of the difficulty and necessity of understanding victims of the Nazi genocide.  His analysis will raise the question of the extent to which the notoriety of the novel may be due to the way it instantiates influential approaches to both literature and the Holocaust in terms of an aesthetic of the sublime, excess, radical ambiguity, and fatalistic entry into an incomprehensible “heart of darkness.”  Prof. LaCapra will also reevaluate the bases for the praise accorded Friedländer’s masterwork and question certain claims made on its behalf by commentators, especially with respect to literary and historiographical innovation.  In so doing, he will explore and defend the role of critical theory in relation to historical narrative.  

For a copy of the poster.


October 29-30
"Monstruos y monstruosidades"
Graduate student conference
Rochambeau House, Music Room
84 Prospect Street

Two day conference of talks and panels, culminating in a closing keynote address by Mary Malcolm Gaylord, professor of Romance Languages and Literatures at Harvard University, entitled "Nuevo mundo, 'nueva lenguaje', nueva poesia: de Polifemo y otros monstruos de la lengua."

For a complete schedule of talks.


November 4
"Calling the French President's Wife a 'Prostitute':The Global Politics of Protecting Iranian Women"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
3:00pm

Speaker Arzoo Osanloo, professor of Anthropology in the Law, Societies and Justice Program at the University of Washington, conducts research and teaches courses focusing on the intersection of law and culture, including human rights, refugee rights and identity, and women's rights in Muslim societies.


November 18
"Not Everybody Knows that I'm Actually Black: The Effects of DNA Ancestry Testing on Racial and Ethnic Boundaries"
Lecture
Science Library, 3rd Floor
12:00pm

Wendy Roth is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology University of British Columbia. Her research is on Race and Ethnicity, Immigration, Latino/a Studies, Genetics and Society, Multiracial Identities and Populations, Racial Classification, Inequality, Social Stratification, Urban Poverty, Research Methods. The interest that motivates much of her current research is how social processes like immigration, intermarriage, or interpretations of new technologies challenge racial boundaries and transform classification systems. Her focus in this area is usually tied to its implications for stratification and race relations.

For a copy of the poster.


February 11
"The Aesthetics of Transport"
Conference
Pembroke Hall 305

The symposium will feature lectures by four scholars of transport, aesthetics, and transnational practices – Marian Aguiar (Carnegie Mellon), Miranda Burgess (University of British Columbia), Lindsey Green-Simms (College of Charleston) and Caren Kaplan (University of California, Davis) – and a roundtable discussion with members of the Brown Community. “The Aesthetics of Transport” positions transportation as a crucial aspect of modern life that has influenced transnational cultural production, and bringing these scholars to Brown University to present their work will give the Brown community access to a growing conversation regarding the intersection of mobility, mediation, and experience.

For more information and program schedule.


February 17
"Race, Class, and Vital Capacity Measurements: Historical Considerations"
Lecture
Science Library, 3rd Floor

Talk by Prof. Lundy Braun, Royce Family Professor in Teaching Excellence and Professor of Medical Science and Africana Studies

Part of the 2010-11 Race and Genomics Lecture Series.


February 24
"Torture and Modernity"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
6:30pm

JM Bernstein, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research, will speak in the second talk of the Violence, Language and Ethics lecture series.

Moral modernity, including political modernity, is founded on the series of acts whereby, throughout Europe, torture was banned.  Torture became the paradigm of moral injury, of what must never be done to an individual because it is intrinsically degrading and devaluing: it harms the human status as such by intentionally harming the present bodily exemplification of it.  Prof. Bernstein will track this claim first historically and then more extensively, following Jean Améry’s account of his torture by the Nazis, phenomenologically.  Prof. Bernstein will take the phenomenology of torture to be the reactivation of its now lost historical origin – lost not to memory, but to historically effective consciousness.

Part of the Violence, Language and Ethics lecture series. 

For a copy of the poster.


February 25
"Improvisation as a Way of Life: A Symposium"
Symposium
Pembroke Hall 305
10am - 5pm

Full day of panel discussions curated by Fitt Artist in Residence, George Lewis, and featuring leading scholars in the arts, humanities, and the social and technological sciences. Together, they will explore the ways in which the study of improvisation as an ubiquitous practice of everyday life can lead to new models of intelligibility, agency, ethics, technology, and social transformation. Panels include “Improvisation, Music, and Political Engagement” and “Interactivity and Human Identity.” The symposium will conclude with a keynote address, titled “Improvisation as a Way of Life,” by Lewis and Arnold I. Davidson, a University of Chicago philosopher.

For more information about George Lewis's visit to campus.


March 13
"Neighbors"
Theatrical production
Granoff Center for the Creative Arts
154 Angell Street
7:30 - 9:30pm

Encounters between a Jewish actor and an Arab musician starring Pablo Ariel and Wassim Bashara of the Galilee Multicultural Theater. Part of the "Israelis and Palestinians: Working Together for a Better Future" conference organized by Judaic Studies.

For more information and the entire conference schedule, click here.

For a copy of the poster.


March 16
"Gotas de lo vario pinto"
Reading (in Spanish)
Rochambeau House, Piano Room
84 Prospect Street
6:00pm

Writer Lorenzo Garcia Vega, member of the legendary Cuba literary group Origenes, won the Cuban National Literature Price in 1952 for his novel Espirales del cuje. For this special event, he will be reading from his latest book, Erogando trizas donde gotas de lo vario pinto (2011).

Part of the Violence, Language and Ethics lecture series.

For a copy of the poster.


March 17
"What is the Environment in Gene-Environment Interaction?"
Lecture
Science Library, 3rd Floor
12:00pm

Talk by Sara Shostak, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Brandeis University.

Part of the 2010-11 Race and Genomics Lecture Series.


March 17
"The Violence in Victimhood: Thomas Bernhard’s Experimental Prose"
Lecture
Maddock Alumni Center
38 Brown Street
6:30pm

Fatima Naqvi, Associate Professor of German and East European Languages and Literatures, Rutgers University will speak. A rhetoric of victimhood permeates Western culture of the post-World War II period. Victimhood is articulated in a variety of art forms and across diverse media; it goes hand-in-hand with self-aggrandizement as well as self-abasement; it becomes a hyperbolic speaking position from which it can be transcended. Thomas Bernhard’s early prose works of the late 1950s, 60s, and 70s, oscillating between social apocalypse and individual tabula rasa, become the testing grounds for the persuasiveness and pitfalls of such rhetoric. In Events (publ. 1969) and The Voice Imitator (1978), Bernhard examines its collusive force and the violence required to transcend it.

Part of the Violence, Language and Ethics Lecture Series.

For a copy of the poster.


April 6 - 29
Circulations of Gender in Global Politics
Lecture series

"Racializations and Biologizations of Queers: Sodomy Law and the Police in New Delhi"
Jyoti Puri, speaker

April 6
12:00pm
Giddings House, 212

"Spectacle and Sexual Minority Rights in Uganda and Kenya"
Keguro Macharia, speaker

April 14
6:00pm
Barus and Holley, 141

"Outsourcing Patriarchy: National Anxieties, Transnational Mediations"
Inderpal Grewal, speaker

April 29
12:00pm
Giddings House, 212

For a copy of the poster.


April 7 and April 9
“Critical Humanities and the Contemporary State of American Politics” 
Watson Institute, Joukowsky Forum
9:30am - 4:00pm

Speakers include Donald Pease, English, Dartmouth College; Ronald Judy, English, University of Pittsburgh; and Hortense Spillers, English, Vanderbilt University.

This two-day workshop is a project of the Critical Global Humanities Initiative at the Cogut Center for the Humanities and the journal Boundary 2.


April 14-16
"Mediating the Risorgimento/Risorgimento Mediato"
Symposium and other events
Various campus locations

2011 marks the 150th anniversary of Italian unification. This International Symposium will explore the role of old and new media in the production and dissemination of an “imagined Italian community” and the articulation of a national discourse, against the backdrop of 19th-century Europe: how different media (illustrated news, opera and theatre, painting and photography, panoramas and film) contributed to shaping the social and political relationships and strategies that resulted in the Italian unification, gave voice and expression to national narratives and iconographies, provided a bridge between elite and popular culture, and influenced post-unitarian debates.

For a complete schedule of events.


April 22-23
"(Re)Making Myths: The Creation, Use, and Abuse of Myths in German Literature, History, and Culture"
Conference
Smith-Buonanno 201

The conference gathers young international scholars to critically
explore the relationship between German identity and myth(making), and thus German discourses on myth within spheres of the everyday, academia, and politics in an interdisciplinary setting. The keynote address will delivered by Prof. Peter Uwe Hohendahl (Cornell University).

For more information on the conference schedule.