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2008-09 Events History

All Sponsored and Co-Sponsored Events


Cogut Center Events

October 9
"Celebrating Darwin in 2009:
Charles Darwin's Life, Times and Origin of Species" 

Janet Browne, speaker
Smith-Buonanno Hall 106
4:30 - 6:00pm

As part of a year-long celebration of the bicentennial of the birth of Charles Darwin (b. 1809) and the 150 year anniversary of the publication of The Origin of Species, Janet Browne, professor of the history of science at Harvard and noted author on Darwin, will speak.

History tells us that Darwin was neither the first nor the only one to think of evolution. This talk takes the opportunity to think carefully about why and how the figure of Darwin still carries such a punch today. It explores the idea of a ‘Darwinian revolution’ and asks why this concept is still so important. Topics include the heroic myths that surround Darwin and religious controversy.

Reception to follow.

For a look at our full year's schedule of Darwin events, click here.


October 10
"Political Art and Its Paradoxes: a Symposium"
Svetlana Boym, Devin Fore, Christina Kiaer,speakers
Pembroke Hall 305
3:00 - 6:30pm

One of the events related to the "Views and Re-Views: Soviet Political Posters and Cartoons" exhibition being mounted at various locations across campus until October 19, 2008. Prof. Svetlana Boym (Harvard), Devin Fore (Princeton and the American Academy in Berlin) and Christina Kiaer (Northwestern University) will form a panel, convened by Cogut Center Director Michael Steinberg.

Reception to follow.


October 17
Pembroke Hall Re-dedication

Pembroke Campus

Venerable Pembroke Hall, the first building of Pembroke College, recently underwent a $9-million renovation process and will now house the Cogut Center for the Humanities and the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women.

Click here for more information.


November 21
"Tristan und Isolde"

Metropolitan Opera
New York City

On Friday, November 21, 2008, a group of students and faculty members will accept an invitation from the Metropolitan Opera to attend a staged rehearsal of Richard Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde (Act 1). The rehearsal began at 11am and will be followed by a conversation with Maestro Daniel Barenboim.

The Cogut Center chartered a bus to and from New York City at no charge to the participants.

For a closer look at the trip, click here.


December 4
"States of Theory in Biology and the Humanities”
Pembroke Hall 305
6:30pm

The second event celebrating the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin and the 150th anniversary of the publication of The Origin of Species will feature two scholars from the sciences and two from the humanities. 

Panel participants:  Patricia Gowaty, Distinguished Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, speaking on “Beyond Narrow-Sense Sexual Selection:  It’s About Time;” Harriet Ritvo, Arthur J. Conner Professor of History, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, “The Problem(s) with Animals;” Vanessa Ryan, Assistant Professor of English, Brown, “Spencer, Cognition, Fiction;” and Marlene Zuk, Professor of Biology, University of California, Riverside, "Evolutionary Theory, Sex, and Gender."

Reception to follow.

For a look at our full year's schedule of Darwin events, click here.

To see photos from this event, click here.


February 4
"The Stakes of a World Literature"
Pembroke Hall 305
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, speaker
5:30pm

In her talk, Prof. Spivak, University Professor and Director of the Center for Comparative Literature and Society at Columbia University will investigate why it is that we are thinking of "global humanities" now, and what is involved for such a project to become possible for us.

This talk, the first in the series “Toward a Global Humanities,” is sponsored by the Global Humanities Initiative, a collaboration of the Cogut Center for the Humanities, the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women, Africana Studies and International Affairs.

For more information about Prof. Spivak, click here.

To see photos from this event, click here.


February 24
"Evolution and Religion"
Pembroke Hall 305
4:30pm

The third installment of the year-long celebration of Darwin's birth and the publication of The Origin of Species. This panel discussion will be lively conversation with leading experts on Darwin's theory of evolution and its impact on how we understand religion.

Participants: Massimo Pigliucci, Ecology and Evolution, SUNY Stony Brook, co-author of Making Sense of Evolution; Mary Bergstein, History of Art + Visual Culture, RISD; Edward Larson, School of Law, Pepperdine, and author of Pulitzer Prize-winning Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion; Kenneth Miller, Biology, Brown University, author of Finding Darwin’s God and Only a Theory: Evolution and the Battle for America's Soul.

Reception to follow.

For a look at our full year's schedule of Darwin events, click here.

To see photos from this event, click here.


February 24 - May 26
"Evolutionary Landscape"
Pembroke Hall
Art exhibit
6:30pm

Artist Eve Stockton exhibits her woodblock prints, collectively called "Evolutionary Landscape," as part of the year-long Darwin events hosted by the Cogut Center and the Committee on Science and Technology Studies. With figures and colors taken directly from nature, Ms. Stockton's art celebrates life on earth from the cellular level up to the familiar.

For a flyer on this exhibit and commentary on Ms. Stockton's work, click here.

For a look at our full year's schedule of Darwin events, click here.


March 9
"Farewell My Concubine"
(1993, in Mandarin with English subtitles, 171 mins.)
Pembroke Hall 305
6:00pm

Free screening of this winner of the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival. Directed by Chen Kaige, this film explores the effect of China's political turmoil during the mid-20th century on the lives of two male stars in a Peking opera troupe and the woman who comes between them. Followed on March 10 with a lecture by Distinguished Visiting Fellow Chengzhou He (see below).


March 10
"Gaze, Performativity and Gender Trouble in Farewell My Concubine"
Pembroke Hall 305
5:00pm

Cogut Center Distinguished Visiting Fellow Chengzhou He will present a lecture on Chen Kaige's 1993 film Farewell My Concubine, winner of the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

For more information about Prof. He, click here.

To view the event poster, click here.


March 17
"Hannah Arendt : Reflections on Ruin "
Hannah Arendt Seminars
Pembroke Hall 305
Brown University
5:30 - 7:00pm

Susannah Gottlieb, Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Northwestern University, will present a talk as part of the four-year Hannah Arendt Seminars.

Reception to follow.

To view the event poster, click here.

To see photos from this event, click here.


April 6
“What’s NEW in Evolution?”
Pembroke Hall 305
4:30pm

The fourth and final installment of the year-long celebration of Darwin's birth and the publication of The Origin of Species. This panel discussion will look at where we go from here and the challenges of applying evolutionary theory to new research.

Panel participants: Marc Kirschner, Systems Biology, Harvard University, co-author of Cells, Embryos, and Evolution and The Plausibility of Life: Resolving Darwin¹s Dilemma; Jonathan Kaplan, Philosophy, Oregon State, co-author of Making Sense of Evolution; Johanna Schmitt, Biology, Brown University; and Peter Taylor, Graduate College of Education, Program in Critical & Creative Thinking, University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Reception to follow.

For a look at our full year's schedule of Darwin events, click here.

To view the event poster, click here.

To see photos from this event, click here.


April 15
"Colonialism and the Emergence of Civil Society"
Pembroke Hall 202
6:00pm

Qadri Ismail, Associate Professor of English at the University of Minnesota, will look at the discourse on “native imagination” by anthropology. Discussant is Syed Nauman Naqvi, Comparative Literature, Brown University. This is the second lecture in the series “Toward a Global Humanities” co-sponsored by the Cogut Center for the Humanities, the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women, Africana Studies, and International Affairs.


April 22
Invitational Lecture in the Humanities
"What is Wisdom?"

Pembroke Hall 305
5:00pm

Charles Larmore, W. Duncan MacMillan Family Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Philosophy, will speak. Prof. Larmore's work in moral and political philosophy has focused on such topics as the foundations of political liberalism, the nature of the self, and the nature of moral judgment. He has also published extensively on figures and problems in the history of philosophy, particularly in the area of 17th century philosophy and on German Idealism.

The Invitational Lecture in the Humanities is an annual event in which a prominent member of the Brown University faculty considers pressing issues in the humanities, issues of importance to scholarship and to the world at large.

To view the event poster, click here.


May 4 - 8
"Music and Human Freedom:
A Week-long Workshop with Musicians from the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra"

Various locations

Continuing the Cogut Center's relationship begun with the December 2006 musical residency of Daniel Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra (WEDO), four musicians will visit the first week in May and participate in a number of events: film screenings, discussions, tours and lectures. Many of the events are open to the public though some may require pre-registration.

To view the public schedule, click here.

To view the event poster, click here.



Co-sponsored Events

September 6 - October 19
"Views and Re-Views: Soviet Political Posters and Cartoons"
David Winton Bell Gallery and John Hay Library
Exhibit times vary; click here for more information

An exhibition of more than 160 works, on loan from a rarely shown private collection of 15,000 - 20,000 posters in the "Socialist Realism" style so closely linked to the former Soviet Union.


October 8
"Views and Re-Views: Looking Back at Bolshevik Political Art"
Abbott Gleason, speaker
List Art Center Auditorium
7:00pm

Co-curator, with Bell Gallery Director Jo-Ann Conklin, of the Soviet Art exhibit, Professor Emeritus Abbott ("Tom") Gleason will lecture on visual sources for the material leading to the art in the exhibit.


October 21
"Still Winter Falls"
Mary Favret, speaker
Department of English, Room 315
70 Brown Street
4:00pm

Part of the "Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace: Literature and Philosophy in Ruins" speaker series. Mary Favret, Associate Professor of English at Indiana University, will speak. Prof. Favret is the author of Romantic Correspondence: Women, Politics and the Fiction of Letters and coeditor of At the Limits of Romanticism: Essays in Cultural, Feminist and Materialist Criticism. Her recent book, War at a Distance: Romanticism and The Making of Modern Wartime (forthcoming 2009), addresses the vexed temporalities of the "everyday" to the experience of war.

Reception to follow.


October 23
"Benjamin in the Age of New Media"
Lutz Koepnick, speaker
Pembroke Hall, Room 305
172 Meeting Street
4:00pm

Part of the New Directions 2008 Lecture Series, Lutz Koepnick, Professor of German, Film and Media Studies at Washington University, St. Louis, will speak in this second talk of the series.


October 30
"Phantasmagoria: Specters of Kant"
Stefan Andriopoulos, speaker
Pembroke Hall, Room 305
172 Meeting Street
4:00pm

Part of the New Directions 2008 Lecture Series, Stefan Andriopoulos, Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures at Columbia University, will speak in this third talk of the series.


November 9
"Shining Through Broken Glass - A Kristallnacht Concert"
Veterans Memorial Auditorium
Providence, RI
7:00pm

Commemorating the infamous night in 1938 when the Nazi regime unleashed a pogrom of epic proportions throughout Germany and Austria, the Cogut Center joins Temple Emanu-El and the Holocaust Education and Resource Center of Rhode Island in offering this program of spoken word and concert performances.

Actor and poet Leonard Nimoy will narrate. The program will feature cantorial soloists Judith Seplowin, Brian Mayer, Lynn Torgove and Scott Sokol; ecumenical choirs with more than 200 adult and youth voices from Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island; and a 32-piece orchestra.

To read more in the press release, click here.


November 10-12
"Greece and Spain: Parallel Histories at the Margins of Europe"
Film screenings
Part of the November 15 conference
All screenings begin at 6:00pm

November 10
"Salonika, City of Silence" (Amaraggi, 2006) and "El Greco" (Smaragdis, 2007)
Salomon Center, Room 202

November 11
"The Traveling Players" (Angelopoulos, 1975)
Salomon Center, Room 202

November 12
"The Spirit of the Beehive" (Erice, 1973)
Wilson Hall, Room 302


November 10
"Cicero's Ghost: The Atlantic, the Enemy and the Laws of War"
Ian Baucom, speaker
Brown Hillel/The Glenn and Darcy Weiner Center
80 Brown Street
5:00pm

Part of the "Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace: Literature and Philosophy in Ruins" speaker series. Ian Baucom, Professor and Chair of the Department of English at Duke University will speak. Prof. Baucom is the author of Out of Place: Englishness, Empire and the Locations of Identity, Specters of the Atlantic: Finance Capital, Slavery, and the Philosophy of History, and co-editor of Shades of Black: Assembling Black Arts in 1980s Britain.


November 11
"Kant and the Idea of 'Other Human Beings of a Different Species Race'"
Peter Fenves, speaker
German Studies
190 Hope Street
4:00pm

Part of the New Directions 2008 Lecture Series, Peter Fenves, Professor of German and Comparative Literature at Northwestern University will speak in this fourth and final talk of the series.


November 15
"Greece and Spain: Parallel Histories at the Margins of Europe"
Conference
Pembroke Hall, Room 202
172 Meeting Street
9:30am - 7:00pm

This conference brings together scholars from Europe and the US to seek a deeper understanding of the analogies, common patterns and converging elements between Greece and Spain.

For a complete description of the Humanities Research Group organizing this conference, click here.

See associated screenings above, scheduled November 10-12.


December 2
"Sharing the Heritage: The Transformation of Holy Places in Jerusalem from the late Byzantine to the Early Islamic Period"
Mahmoud Hawari, speaker
Mencoff Hall
68 Waterman Street
5:30pm

University of Oxford professor Mahmoud Hawari will speak in a lecture co-sponsored by several departments including Ancient Studies, Middle East Studies, Religious Studies and the Cogut Center for the Humanities.


December 12-14
"Thinking, Recording and Writing History in the Ancient World"
Conference
Pembroke Hall, 305
172 Meeting Street

Concern about the past and thinking about history are hallmarks of developed civilizations. The purpose of this conference is to conduct such a study on a broad comparative basis, including ancient civilizations from the Far East to the Far West. “Ancient” is here understood loosely, so as to include American civilizations that chronologically do not fit traditional periodizations.

For complete conference information, click here.


February 5 - March 20
"Emancipated Memories: Uncovering the Hidden Faces of Slavery "
Art exhibition
Monday - Friday, 2 - 5 pm
John Nicholas Brown Center

"Emancipated Memories" is a solo exhibition of the work of New England artist Cora Marshall, whose mixed media artwork draws from the history and legacy of slavery. Her portraits of slave women, men, and children combine archival documents, in the form of sale and runaway advertisements, to make connections to the past and honor the memory of lives in pursuit of freedom.


February 6
"The Anthropological Argument: The Rediscovery of Ancient Skepticism in Modern Thought"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall, 305
3:00pm

Speaker Danilo Marcondes de Souza Filho holds a PhD in Philosophy from St. Andrew's University (Scotland). He's Professor of Philosophy and the former Vice-President for Academic Affairs at the Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, one of Brown's partner institutions in Brazil.


February 10
"Being There: Personal Engagement in Academic Research"
Panel Discussion
Pembroke Hall, 305
5:00pm

Royce Fellows Reem Yusuf (Cogut Center Undergraduate Fellow), Lauren Williams and Zoe Brennan-Krohn talk about their research. Moderated by Christopher Lydon.


March 5
"Subjects & Objects, Words & Things"
Lecture
Brown/RISD Hillel
80 Brown Street
5:00pm

Speaker Bill Brown is the Edward Carson Waller Distinguished Service Professor of English, Visual Arts, History of Culture and the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory. He currently serves as co-editor for Critical Inquiry. He received his PhD in English from Stanford University in 1989 and has been teaching at the University of Chicago since, establishing himself as a prominent scholar of 19th and 20th century American Literature, Modernism and Mass Culture.

This lecture is the English Department's 2009 Graduate Student Lecture.


March 5-7
"Women in the Archives"
Conference
Brown University
Various locations

Based on the work begun through a 2007-08 Humanities Research Grant from the Cogut Center, this conference will explore the role of archival materials in the study and teaching of early women's writing.

Highlights include keynote presentations by Margaret Ezell and Margo Hendricks, and a gala 20th birthday celebration for the Brown University Women Writers Project.

To see conference poster, click here.


March 6-7
"Immigrant Paradox"
Conference
Pembroke Hall 305

Children of immigrants are the fastest growing sector of the American youth population—they currently make up nearly a quarter of the US youth population and are projected to comprise fifty percent by 2040. Despite the considerable developmental risks of growing up in an immigrant family, research has documented better behavioral and academic outcomes in some first generation children and adolescents than their later generation peers. In addition, many developmental outcomes deteriorate with greater acculturation. Together these trends have been termed the "immigrant paradox."


March 6-8
"Violence and Civilization"
Conference
MacMillan Hall

Funded by a Cogut Center Humanities Research Grant, this conference stages an interdisciplinary discussion of the many ambivalent linkages between violence and order through human history. It will bring together scholars presenting on a variety topics relating to violence and civilization from ancient China to the modern US.

Visit the Violence and Civilization website.


March 11
"Human Beauty and the Nature of Art in Modernity: from the Art Galleries to the Operating Theaters and Back"
Lecture
RISD, Chace Center
15 North Main Street
7:00pm

March 12
"Workshop on Psychoanalysis and Visual Culture"
An informal conversation with Sander Gilman
RISD, Ewing House
41 Waterman Street
12:00 - 2:00pm

Sander Gilman, Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Professor of Psychiatry at Emory University, will speak.


March 13
"Gender, Modern China, and the Transnational Humanities"
Colloquium
Pembroke Hall 305
12:45 - 5:30pm

Co-sponsored by the Cogut Center, Pembroke Center, East Asian Studies, Africana Studies and International Affairs, this colloquium brings together scholars from the US and China to discuss matters of gender in modern China.

Click here for the colloquium schedule.


March 13-14
"Post-Colonial Melancholia"

Conference
Alumnae Hall, Crystal Room

Even as the actual historical experience of colonization and imperialism, as well as their effective legacy and continuing revival, is one of defeat and loss, the critical traditions that reflect on this experience have paradoxically often been buoyant and even triumphalist. This conference asks questions related to loss and melancholia and their role as the unacknowledged core of postcoloniality.


March 13-14
"Theatricality and Performance"

Conference
Grant Recital Hall
9:00am - 5pm

This symposium explores the appearance of theatricality in diverse cultural performances including opera, political spectacle, popular music, video games, dance and avant-garde theater. Questions that will be considered include: how theatricality reproduces or subverts power relations; what role it plays in individual and collective identity formation; how it is reinscribed in newer forms of media; and how it can be manipulated for social and political effects.


March 14
"The Last Performance"
Performance Collective
Pembroke Hall 305
7:00pm

from their flyer: "The Last Performance . . . is a constraint-based collaborative writing, archiving and text-visualization project responding to the theme of lastness in relation to architecture, acts of building, and the interruption (that becomes the promise) of community. Source texts submitted at thelastperformance.org become raw material for a constantly evolving textual landscape." Mark Jeffery and Judd Morrissey perform.


Month of April
"More than Marriage: Building an Inclusive Queer Movement"
Gay Pride Month
Student activities
Various locations

This year's theme is in response to the dominant preoccupation with marriage among LGBT people throughout the country, a phenomenon that the organizers believe occurs at the expense of other issues facing members of the queer community. Pride Month will include a series of lectures, performances, discussions, and films regarding issues in the queer community.  The purpose of this month is to engage the entire campus community along with the greater Providence and New England communities around common issues and themes of sexuality and society. 


April 3
"Can Obama Deliver an International Climate Treaty: Report from Poznan"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
12:00 noon

Ricardo Lagos, former president of Chile, UN special envoy for climate change, and Brown University professor-at-large, will speak on the issues surrounding President Obama's desire for the US to be a major player in the International Climate Treaty, replacing the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, to be signed in Copenhagen in December 2009.


April 5-7
"Cultured Jews: The Art and Science of Jewish Ethnography"
Conference
Various locations

Panel presentations will be offered on current trends in the ethnographic study of Jews and Judaism with a focus on global comparisons. Position papers from three scholars will address "Thinking Theoretically about Jews," presenting thought pieces which reckon with major theoretical issues in the study of Jewish culture and, in particular, with ethnography and other representational techniques. MacArthur-winning scholar Ruth Behar (University of Michigan) will give the keynote talk on the tension between the art and science of studying Jewish life with examles drawn from her recent book about Jews in Cuba.


April 6
"The Bishop, the Pirate, and the Black Slave: Cuba's Renaissance Epic"
Lecture
John Carter Brown Library Reading Room
5:30pm

Peter Hulme is Professor in Literature and Head of the Department in Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies at the University of Essex in Colchester, UK. This lecture examines the Espejo de paciencia [The Paragon of Patience], a poem in the epic tradition written in 1608 in Cuba, which is one of the earliest works of American literature. Prof. Hulme is the author of 'The Tempest' and Its Travels (2000) and The Cambridge Companion to Travel Writing (2002).

Reception to follow.


April 6-9
"¡Mi Gente! Pa'lante y Pa'ya: Moving Forward as a United People"

Puerto Rican Cultural Week
Various times and locations

This annual week of events is organized by students. Speakers include Prof. Juan Flores, Dr. Cesar Rey and Giannina Braschi.

To view the poster, click here.


April 10-17
"Students under Occupation"
Photography exhibit
Pembroke Hall Ground Floor
8:30am - 5:00pm Monday - Friday
Opening reception - April 10 7:00pm

The Right to Education Photography Project is hosting an exhibition of approximately 25 works captured by a group of student photographers from Birzeit University and Al-Najah University in Palestine visually documenting their everyday experiences and the obstruction of Palestinian education under military occupation. Some of the themes explored in the exhibition are isolation, poverty, resistance, and determination.


April 14
"Jerusalem in the Muslim Crusader Conflict after Saladin (1216-1260)"
Lecture
Annmary Brown Memorial
21 Brown Street

Muhsin Yusuf, historian from Birzeit University and former director of the Palestinian Center for Israeli Studies in Ramallah, Palestine, will speak.

Raised in Galilee and schooled in Nazareth, Prof. Yusuf graduated from Hebrew University in Jerusalem before earning his PhD in Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University. He has published extensively on Israeli-Palestinian relations. 


April 15
"The Palestinian Arabs in Israel"
Lecture
Watson Institute, McKinney Room
12:00 noon

Muhsin Yusuf, historian from Birzeit University and former director of the Palestinian Center for Israeli Studies in Ramallah, Palestine, will speak.

See April 14 lecture for more information on the speaker.


April 15
"Audible Montage or, Eurydice's Footfall"
Performance
Brown Hillel
80 Brown Street
5:30pm

What does thinking out loud sound like? Or more pointedly, how does the juxtaposition of images, visual and aural, create a thinking sound through motion, create a motion that makes for thinking with the still image in relation one to another?

The performance group Four-Second Decay, inspired by the methodology of WG Sebald to "stage memory," will engage the work of Aby Warburg.


April 15
"The Kingdom of Kongo, the Kingdom of Angola, and the Thirty Years' War: African Diplomacy and Portuguese Politics in the Struggle for the Atlantic, 1620-48"
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30pm

John Thornton is Professor of History at Boston University and will offer the second Gulbenkian-Vasco da Gama Lecture on Portugal and the Early Modern World.

John Thornton is the author of The Kingdom of Kongo: Civil War and Transition, 1641-1718 (1983); Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic Worlds, 1400-1680 (1992); The Kongolese Saint Anthony : Dona Beatriz Kimpa Vita and the Antonian movement, 1684-1706 (1998); and (with Linda Heywood) Central Africans, Atlantic Creoles, and the Foundation of the Americas, 1585-1660 (2007). He is currently working (with Linda Heywood) on Angolans in the Early Anglo-Dutch Atlantic, 1615-50 (under contract with Cambridge University Press).


April 16
"Art Goes Public: Memorials and Interventions"
Lecture
John Nicholas Brown Center
357 Benefit Street
4:00 - 6:00pm

Conceptual artists Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock explore how memory functions in society and how it is reflected symbolically in urban spaces. How can memorial projects impact everyday life through the intrusion of art on public spaces?


April 17
"LIFE~BOAT: Collections and Hybridity"
Workshop
John Nicholas Brown Center
10 am - 3:30 pm

This interactive and participatory workshop will center around Stih and Schnock's most recent work, LIFE~BOAT, which examines cultural representations of boats and metaphorical understandings of transversing space and time. Workshop space is limited; pre-registration is required. Contact the JNBC.

These Berlin-based artists are perhaps best known for several memorial projects commemorating the Holocaust and the lost German Jewish community. By injecting media, such as text, images, and film projections, into public space, Stih and Schnock make viewers newly aware of how today's landscape may conceal traumatic events from the past.


April 16
"Local Culture in a Global Society: Folk Tonality in Contemporary Sweden"
Lecture
Orwig Music Building 315
6:00pm

April 17
"Similarity as a Determinant of Melody Structure: A Cognitively-based Computerized Model of Musical Structure"

Lecture
Orwig Music Building 315
6:00pm

April 18
"The World of the Polska: A Practical Introduction to the Beats of Scandinavia"

Workshop
Orwig Music Building 301
1:00pm
Musicians of all skill levels are invited to participate in this workshop.

Speaker and workshop leader Sven Ahlbäck, from the Royal College of Music, Stockholm, is a cognitive musicologist, folk arts advocate and leading performer of traditional Scandinavian folk music.


April 20-23
"International Writers Project: There Will Still Be Light: A Freedom to Write Literary Festival"
Art exhibit
Pembroke Hall Ground Floor
8:30am - 5:00pm, Monday - Friday
Opening reception - April 20 4:30pm

Exhibition of Burmese political cartoons by three Burmese artists, curated by the most famous of them, "Mr. Burma" (Win Tun). Contributing artists include Maung Maung Aung, Win Pe, Htein Lin and Chaw Ei Thein.

Part of a multi-day festival of film screenings, readings, panel discussions and other events around campus.

Click here for more information.


April 23
"Thinking About Food in a Globalized Century"
Keynote Forum
Pembroke Hall 305
6:30pm

A conversation with the founding editor of the award-winning food journal Gastronomica Darra Goldstein (Gastronomica and Williams College) and Mark Swislocki, Assistant Professor of History, Brown University. The keynote forum of the "Eating Chinese: Comestibles, Cuisine, Commerce and Culture" conference, a collaboration of Brown University and Johnson & Wales University.

For more information on the conference, click here.


April 28
“La Grande Italia”
Lecture
Pembroke Hall 305
5:30pm

Emilio Gentile, Professor of Contemporary History at University of Rome, La Sapienza, will speak on his new book, “La Grande Italia: The Myth of the Nation in the Twentieth Century."

Prof. Gentile is a distinguished historian of fascism, best known for his interpretation of fascism as a “political religion.” He is the author of several books, including The Sacralization of Politics in Fascist Italy (Harvard University Press), The Struggle for Modernity: Nationalism, Futurism, and Fascism (Praeger), The Origins of Fascist Ideology, 1918-1925 (Enigma), and Storia del partito fascista, 1919-1922: movimento e milizia (Laterza).

To view the event poster, click here.


May 10 - September 20
"The Origin of the Theory:  Tracing Darwin's Evolutionary Thought"
Library Exhibit
John Hay Library

In honor of the Darwin bicentennial, this exhibit at the John Hay Library will use the Library’s extensive holdings in the History of Science to place Darwin and his colleagues within the broader context of Victorian scientific endeavor. The exhibition will include books, prints and original correspondence, and will be featured during Commencement Weekend.

For library hours, click here.