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Fall 2012

September 19
Creative Medicine Series
"Museum Rounds: What Art Can Teach Future Doctors"

Lecture
5:30 - 7:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305

Statistics across the patient safety literature show it: uncertainty is safer than false certainty. Why is this so hard to teach novice physicians? Alexa Miller, co-creator of the "Training the Eye" Program at Harvard Medical School, speaks on aligning medical training with visual art. It is broadly understood in medicine and in science that observation and successful navigation of ambiguity are essential components of expertise. Yet schooling at all levels lacks a consistent model for teaching students how to look and to experience uncertainty. Increasingly, medical schools express a need for teaching medical students these skills, and look to community partners in the arts for help. This talk will introduce the idea of aesthetic attention, a set of cognitive skills effectively learned in art. Miller will review signifiers in the medical literature describing needs for aesthetic attention, and share research findings from Harvard Medical School’s “Training the Eye,” as well as other studies on arts impact in K-12 and medical education.

A copy of the poster.

Visit the photo gallery from this event.

Read the Brown Daily Herald article.


September 21
"Ethiopian Modernism: A Subaltern Perspective"
Lecture
5:30 - 7:00pm
Pembroke Hall

Speaker Elizabeth Giorgis, Director of the Modern Art Museum, Gebre Kristos Desta Center, and Curator of the Museum of the Institute of Ethiopian Studies, Addis Ababa University, is a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Cogut Center. Recognizing that the beginning of the discourse of modern Ethiopian art history is of urgent concern, Giorgis examines Ethiopian modernism’s strategy, its limits, structures of exclusion and the totality of this experience. Focusing on prominent visual artists who are widely believed to be the pioneers of Ethiopian modernism, she aims to reveal the discursive and philosophical limitations and drawbacks of Ethiopian modernism, and its interpretation in the Ethiopian imaginary by engaging with non-Western contexts of modernity, interrogating modern Ethiopian art within the debates and parameters of African modernism, and establishing a space to analyze specific languages of Ethiopian modernist expressions.

A copy of the poster.

Visit the photo gallery from this event.


September 26
Mist (Angae, 1967)
and
The Flower Girl (Kkotpaneun Choneo, 1972)
Film screenings
6:00 - 10:00pm
Granoff Center, Martinos Auditorium
154 Angell Street

See two rarely screened classics from opposing sides of the DMZ. Mist, directed by Kim Soo-yong is widely regarded as a landmark film in the history of Korean Modernist cinema. It was so successful in adapting the lexicon of European modernist filmmaking to Korean sensibilities that it earned its director the nickname of "the Antonioni of Korea."

The Flower Girl is the film adaptation of a revolutionary opera written by Kim Il-Sung, the founding leader of North Korea, and first staged in 1930.

More information about the films. Free and open to the public.

These films are being shown in conjunction with the "Film Theory and National Publics in Divided Korea" colloquium being held on October 1 (see below)


October 1
"Film Theory and National Publics in Divided Korea"
Colloquium
1:00 - 5:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305

This colloquium brings scholars of Korean film and media together to discuss cinema's ideological function in the development of theories of state-craft and culture industries in both North and South Korea. This event will highlight the importance of representational regimes of mass culture, when considering the operation and effects of authoritarianism on the Korean peninsula. Further, the colloquium will consider the continuities to be found in the transformation of perception undertaken through modernization wrought by the Japanese colonial administration, the post-war period of rapid development, and the post-Cold War period of democratization in South Korea and consolidation of hereditary dictatorship in the North.

Speakers include Moonim Baek, Yonsei University; Steven Chung, Princeton University; Sunah Kim, Dankook University; Travis Workman, University of Minnesota/Twin Cities. Convened by Postdoctoral Fellow in International Humanities Michelle Cho, East Asian Studies and Modern Culture and Media.

Colloquium schedule.

A copy of the poster.


October 4
Places of Healing Series
"Bubbles and Powder-Kegs: Buses in the (ex)Yugoslav Imaginary"

Lecture
5:30 - 7:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305

Speaker Marko Zivkovic, University of Alberta/Edmonton, uses films and urban folklore to investigate buses in the (ex)Yugoslav imaginary as dramatic stages for intimate violence, everyday laments and social commentary. Often proclaimed as best Serbian movie of all times, Slobodan Sijan's 1980 Who's Singin' Over There? takes places entirely in and around a bus headed for Belgrade in 1941. In an episode in Goran Paskaljevic's 1998 Cabaret Balkan (The Powder-Keg), a young man steals a public transportation bus in Belgrade and terrorizes passengers. Goran Markovic's 2002 The Cordon, features a bus full of policemen on a nightmarish journey through Belgrade streets one night during the 1996-7 anti-Milosevic protests. The most horrendous scene in all of Yugoslav cinema takes place in a bus (Zafranovic’s 1978 Occupation in 26 Tableau). Giving up seats to elderly is taken as a gauge of general cultural level, dodging the ticket controller a proof of urban resourcefulness, or a source of ghastly scenarios; the regularity of schedule and cleanliness of buses a proof of civilization.

A copy of the poster.


October 10
Noontime Concert: Beethoven, Nacar, Barber
Recital
12:30 - 1:30pm
Pembroke Hall 305

Cellist and member of the Brown Music faculty Daniel Harp joins pianist and composer Benjamin Nacar '12 in a program of Ludwig van Beethoven, Cello Sonata no. 5 in d major, op. 102 no. 2; Benjamin Nacar, Cello Sonata in G major; and Samuel Barber, Cello Sonata in C minor, op. 6.

This concert is free and open to the public.

A copy of the flyer.

A copy of the program.


CANCELLED--October 30
"Of Miracles, Events, and Special Effects"
Lecture
5:30 - 7:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305

Speaker Hent deVries, Russ Family Professor in the Humanities and Director of the Humanities Center, Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, Johns Hopkins University will address these questions. What characterizes genuine events, in history and politics, individual lives and loves? In what sense might miracles, more precisely, the theology and tradition of miracle belief, offer the greatest resource for answering this philosophical question, even or especially in an age of global media? Further, how do we determine the meaning and role of real events in public or, rather, global religions under the expansion of new technological media? We will seek to establish a dialogue among traditional theologies of the miracle, modern philosophies of the event, and contemporary media theories of the special effect in order to answer these questions. Our current challenge, it will be claimed, is to analyze and compare these old and new archives and apparatuses in terms of their idioms and concepts, methods and arguments, metaphysics and politics, so as to develop a critical, heuristic, and diagnostic interpretive tool for the engagement of much larger questions at hand.

A copy of the poster.


CANCELLED--October 31
"The Miracle of the Dancing Ball: Walter Benjamin, Mechanical Mysticism and the Apocalyptic Epistemology Of Changing Everything, All At Once"
Master seminar
12:00 - 2:00pm
By invitation only

This seminar will consist in a close philosophical reading of Benjamin's short story "Rastelli Narrates" and its accompanying sources and parallels. These enigmatic texts will be placed against the broader background of the modern question of mind and machine and the spiritual automaton that animates some of this author's most telling meditations on the fate of the political in general, and of its critical method and orientation, namely historical materialism and theology, in particular. We will take issue with some recent discussions of Benjamin's stance (notably by Giorgio Agamben and Eric Santner) and aim to resituate him squarely within the much older tradition of the theologico-political that he was one of the first to expose to the unprecedented problems raised by the new technologies of contemporary media.

Speaker Hent deVries will conduct a master seminar for faculty and invited graduate students. Assigned reading required prior to day of seminar. Those who would like to join the Master Seminar must contact Humanities Center. Seating is limited.

A copy of the flyer.


CANCELLED--October 31
"The Many Faces of Schreber as the Faces of Postwar American Psychoanalysis (1960-2000)"
Lecture
5:30 - 7:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305

Since Freud published his seminal paper on psychosis (1911) basing his argument on Judge Daniel Paul Schreber’s memoir of his nervous illness, Schreber has become the paradigmatic madman both in the humanities and in clinical psychoanalysis. This lecture offers a historiography of American psychoanalysis’ theory of and praxis with schizophrenia, the paradigmatic form of madness in the modern era of psychiatry, based on American psychoanalysts’ accounts of the Schreber case from 1960 until 2000. It covers four decades during which the theoretical approach of psychoanalysts to psychosis and their clinical work with psychotic patients underwent a dramatic transformation and would eventually reach a point where psychoanalysis almost “lost its mind” as it tried to bring the “neurons back to neurosis.” As it follows psychoanalysis in its struggles and competition as well as its dialogues and negotiations with psychiatry, the lecture presents the boundaries between these diverse professional landscapes not only as markers of difference, segregating epistemic and disciplinary jurisdictions, but also as capturing a fundamental social process of fatal osmosis and the blurring of relevant distinctions. Since the speaker, Orna Ophir, is both a historian of science and a practicing psychoanalyst, who has worked for many years in psychiatric hospitals with patients suffering madness, the lecture will open with a story of a young and bright patient who was the victim not only of his mental states, but also of the predicament of psychoanalysis during this period, in its very inability to make up its mind between two competing conceptual and therapeutic approaches.

Orna Ophir is a clinical psychologist from Israel and a licensed psychoanalyst in New York. She holds a PhD from the Cohn Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Ideas, at Tel Aviv University, and is currently a Post-Doctoral Associate at the DeWitt Wallace Institute for the History of Psychiatry, at Weill-Cornell Medical College in New York. She is also an Advanced Candidate to become an Internationally Certified Psychoanalyst at the Institute for Psychoanalytic Training and Research (IPTAR) in New York. She currently works as an analyst and psychotherapist at the IPTAR Clinical Center.

Co-sponsored by the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women and the Cogut Center.

A copy of the poster.


CANCELLED--November 1
"Klein in America - The Marginalization of Melanie Klein's Thought in American Psychoanalysis 1924-2010"
Master seminar
12:00 - 2:00pm
By invitation only

Although considered one of the most important figures in the history of psychoanalysis after Freud, Melanie Klein (1882-1960), the controversial Austrian-born, British psychoanalyst has found a reception in the United States that has remained very limited and this for reasons that are far from clear. Since, as Edith Kurzweil (1992) suggests, psychoanalysts function within the context of homegrown philosophical and cultural assumptions, to say nothing of the intellectual controversies and the fashions of the day, every continent and country unconsciously creates the “Freud” it needs and the psychoanalytic theory and technique it requires. After Freud, American psychoanalysis chose the father’s “legitimate child,” namely Anna Freud. With her emphasis on scientific research, pragmatism, reality, and the libido, Anna Freud was privileged over Melanie Klein, who had leaned more toward intuitive observation than toward logical deduction and who throughout her career remained greatly interested in the darker and deeper levels of human consciousness, that is, in the madness of the sane, the death instinct and aggression.

The group will discuss the possible hypothesis that it was in particular Klein’s emphasis on this negative domain, that is to say, on anxiety and alterity, death and the psychotic, indeed, on the terror created in the infantile core of every adult, that made her so “hard to swallow,” especially by American psychoanalysts.

Seminar leader Orna Ophir will conduct a master seminar for faculty and invited graduate students. Assigned reading required prior to day of seminar. Those who would like to join the Master Seminar must contact Humanities Center. Seating is limited.

Co-sponsored by the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women and the Cogut Center.

A copy of the flyer.


CANCELLED--November 1
Religion and Internationalism Project Symposia
"'Religious Radicalisms' and Modernity: Allies or Enemies?"

Symposium
4:00 - 6:00pm
Watson Institute, Kim Koo Library
111 Thayer Street

Hent deVries, Humanities Center and Department of Philosophy, Johns Hopkins University, and Nathaniel Berman, Cogut Center for the Humanities lead this symposium. Once upon a time, there was a widely embraced narrative that portrayed modernity, secularization, and the privatization of religion as intrinsically linked and as extending their twin sway in an inevitable and salutary historical trajectory.  Every element of this narrative, often associated both with intra-European processes initiated by the Reformation and the Enlightenment and with the modalities of colonial domination, has come under challenge from a large variety of perspectives in the past several decades.  Despite these critiques, however, some of its basic tenets, especially the link between secularity and progress, continually resurface in both academic debate and public responses to world events.  In this symposium, participants will critically examine one of the key foundation-stones of this narrative, and ask whether “religious radicalisms,” in all their fantasmatic diversity, have ever simply been the adversary of “modernity,” or whether the latter has always been constituted in dialectical relationship to the “religious Other.”

Recommended readings:

Reading #1

Reading #2

A copy of the flyer.


November 1
Places of Healing Series
"What We Talk About When We Talk About Dargahs"

Lecture
5:30 - 7:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305

Carla Bellamy, Baruch College, City University of New York, will speak. Shrines built in memory of charismatic Muslim teachers are a ubiquitous part of the South Asian landscape. Commonly known as dargahs, these structures are popular places of pilgrimage, and are patronized not only by Muslims, but also Hindus, Sikhs, and Christians who come seeking healing. Because dargahs are institutions without clear analogues in Europe and North America – even within the South Asian diaspora - they are uniquely equipped to offer insight into the nature of religious identity in contemporary South Asia, and its place in everyday life. Drawing upon ethnographic research conducted over a decade at a popular dargah in central India, this talk will explore the innovative and often surprising ways in which dargah patrons use discourses of religious identity to facilitate their own healing processes. 

Carla Bellamy's research focuses on the dynamic intersection of religious identity, religious conflict, and conceptions of selfhood, healing, and misfortune in contemporary South Asian communities.  Her first book, The Powerful Ephemeral: Everyday Healing in an Ambiguously Islamic Place, was published by the University of California Press in 2011 as part of the South Asia Across the Disciplines series.  Her current research interests include a study of the rise of the cult of the Hindu deity Shani in contemporary urban India, a history of a little-known Sufi saint venerated in northwestern Madhya Pradesh, and a study of discourses of magic in the modern South Asian diaspora.  

A copy of the poster.


November 7
Creative Medicine Series
"Artists and Scientists as Partners: Dance, Music and Neuroscience"

Lecture and demonstration
5:30 - 7:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305

Speakers Julie Adams Strandberg, Theatre Arts and Performance Studies, and Rachel Balaban, Mark Morriss Dance Group Regional Coordinator for Dance for PD, are co-founders of Artists and Scientists as Partners (ASaP), a research and advocacy group dedicated to understanding and implementing the arts within a holistic healing approach for people with Parkinson’s Disease and Autism Spectrum Disorders. In this presentation, the speakers will specifically look at dance and its applications to those diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease. The presentation will be based on clinical, anecdotal, and experiential evidence. Balaban and Strandberg will discuss the impact dance can have on patients in terms of disease, wellbeing, and creative and artistic growth. The goal of this presentation is to expose students and faculty to complementary practices that can benefit patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as PD, and emphasize the importance of arts within the medical field.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Emergency Medicine, the Creative Arts Council and the Cogut Center.

A copy of the poster.


November 8
"Indefensible Ideas: Touching Polemic, Criticism, and Creativity"
Lecture
12:00 - 2:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305

Philosopher, critic, and writer David Farrell Krell joins Brown’s German Department as Brauer Distinguished Visiting Professor of German Studies and as a Cogut Humanities Center Distinguished Visitor in Fall 2012. Krell, who had the opportunity to work with Heidegger himself, is the author of many important books on German, French, and Ancient Greek thought. One of the leading living American thinkers specializing in the German and European critical traditions, he has published a dozen scholarly books on thinkers and topics such as Nietzsche, Heidegger, the tragic absolute in German Idealism, architecture, the problem of “contagion,” and Derrida and the work of mourning, among others. He also is the author of three novels to date: The Recalcitrant Art: Diotima’s Letters to Hölderlin and Related Missives; Son of Sprit; and Nietzsche: A Novel. While at Brown this fall, Krell is co-teaching an interdisciplinary seminar with Gerhard Richter, “Ontology of Life: Reading Heidegger’s Being and Time with Derrida” (German 2660K).

A copy of the poster.



November 12
"Two Angels/Two Modernities: Walter Benjamin and the Art-Historical Paradigm"
Master seminar
11:00am - 1:00pm
By pre-registration only

Anthony Vidler, Dean and Professor from the School of Architecture at the Cooper Union, will lead this master seminar.

Seating is limited. To register, contact Diana Adamczyk.

Co-sponsored by the History of Art and Architecture and the Cogut Center.


November 13
"Mandela's Mortality"
Lecture
5:30 - 7:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305

This talk will track and consider Nelson Mandela’s attitudes to death in the course of his life – both to the deaths of others and to his own death. It will explore his thinking, across several decades, about life and death in general, about the obligations of the living to the dead and about his inner world as he experienced deep suffering and loss, states of being which one ‘never wants to experience ever again’.  The lecture will consider the shock which will constitute his death, despite the fact that it will be anything but a sudden death, his life having been a long oscillation between encounter, distance and separation, solitude and conviviality, the life of the day and the life of the night.  

Speaker Sarah Nuttall, Research Professor of English, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa is the incoming Director of the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research (WISER) in Johannesburg.  She is the author of Entanglement: Literary and Cultural Reflections on Postapartheid, editor of Beautiful/Ugly: African and Diaspora Aesthetics, and co-editor of many books including, most recently, Johannesburg – The Elusive Metropolis and Load Shedding: Writing On and Over the Edge of South Africa.

Co-sponsored by the Department of English, Africana Studies, Modern Culture and Media, the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women, and the Cogut Center.

A copy of the poster.

Visit the photo gallery from this event.

Watch the video of this lecture.


November 13
"Enlightenment Ecologies: Nature and Myth in Ledoux's Architectural Universe"
Lecture
5:30pm
List Art 120
64 College Street

Anthony Vidler, Dean and Professor from the School of Architecture at the Cooper Union, will speak.

Co-sponsored by the History of Art and Architecture and the Cogut Center.


November 14
"Private Lives and Public Cultures in South Africa"
Master Seminar
12:00 - 2:00pm
by invitation only

One important strand of contemporary South African culture is focused on publicly interrogating the so-called private domain of bodies, sexuality, friendship, home spaces and other forms and sites of intimacy. Even as the now almost twenty-year-old African National Congress (ANC) government consolidates a new official culture deeply invested in controlling representations of private life, artists and other culture-makers have increasingly turned to personal offerings of the self and private experience in the public realm. We’ll consider theses issues in relation to global trends and local specificities.

Speaker Sarah Nuttall will conduct this master seminar for faculty and invited graduate students. Assigned reading required prior to day of seminar. Those who would like to join the Master Seminar must contact Madhumita Lahiri. Seating is limited.

Co-sponsored by the Department of English, Modern Culture and Media, Africana Studies, the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women, and the Cogut Center.


November 14
"Africa in Theory"
Lecture
5:30 - 7:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305

The status of Africa in modern disciplines has been paradoxical. On the one hand, Africa has provided modern social sciences and the humanities with some of its most productive concepts. On the other hand, the Continent has been treated as a residual entity, the knowledge of which adds very little to the workings of our world. This lecture will reflect on this paradox and propose ways of overcoming it. Building on Jean and John Comaroff's recent book Theory from the South, it will argue that there is no better place to assess current global transformations than Africa.

Speaker Achille Mbembe is Research Professor in History and Politics at the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research (WISER) in Johannesburg, South Africa. He is the author of, amongst many other books, On The Postcolony and editor of Johannesburg – The Elusive Metropolis.   He is also convenor of The Johannesburg Workshop in Theory and Criticism (JWTC). He teaches the Fall semester at Duke University every year.  

Co-sponsored by French Studies, the Department of English, Africana Studies, Modern Culture and Media, the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women, and the Cogut Center.

Visit the photo gallery from this event.

A copy of the poster.


November 15
"Futures of Nature"
Master Seminar
12:00 - 2:00pm
by invitation only

Humans are a species alongside other species, one whose survival is threatened by its own behavior. If to survive the ecological crisis means to work out new ways to live with the Earth, then a different mode of humanity is required. What forms could this new mode of humanity take?

Speaker Achille Mbembe will conduct a master seminar for faculty and invited graduate students. Assigned reading required prior to day of seminar. Those who would like to join the Master Seminar must contact Madhumita Lahiri. Seating is limited.

Co-sponsored by French Studies, Africana Studies, Modern Culture and Media, the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women, and the Cogut Center.


November 29
Religion and Internationalism Project Symposia
"Is Comparative Religion a Colonial Project?"

Symposium
4:00 - 6:00pm
Watson Institute, Kim Koo Library
111 Thayer Street

Symposium leaders will be Tomoko Masuzawa, History and Comparative Literature, University of Michigan, and Michael Puett, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University. In the past generation, critics across a broad range of disciplines have sought to trace a colonial genealogy for certain strands of the universalizing impulse.  Some have argued that such strands embody a mode of domination that persists implicitly in many of the categories of “comparative religion,” as well as in the very idea of secular modernity.  Such critiques have been lodged at each of these terms – “religion,” “secularity,” and “comparison” – as well as their inter-relationships.  In this light, we ask – is the very idea of comparative religion necessarily a legacy of the colonial project? We conceive of colonialism not only as a past historical phenomenon, involving formal territorial rule, but as a mode of implicit or explicit epistemic violence that may continue to frame the present. Bearing in mind these genealogies of violence, is it even possible to conceive of concepts that may enable comparisons within, or between, different religions and secularities, in ways that are not wholly mediated by Eurocentric notions of the “universal"? 

Recommended reading #1.
Recommended reading #2.
Recommended reading #3.

A copy of the flyer.

Visit the Religion and Internationalism Project for more information.


November 29
"The Victorian Archive and Its Secret"
Sarah Cutts Frerichs Lecture in Victorian Studies

5:30 - 7:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305

This talk looks closely at the formal techniques by which Dickens and Darwin dismantled the cultural and natural taxonomies bequeathed to them by natural philosophy and eighteenth-century fiction.  This paper spells out the formal logic of the social world that Dickens assembled from that debris in hopes of shedding new light on the dynamic relationship among the species for which Darwin so successfully argued.

Speaker Nancy Armstrong, formerly the Nancy Duke Lewis Professor of Comparative Literature, English, Modern Culture & Media, and Gender Studies at Brown, is currently the Gilbert, Louis & Edward Lehrman Professor of English at Duke. She is interested in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British and American fiction, empire and sexuality, narrative and critical theory, visual culture, and scientific discourses at work in literary forms. She is best known for her groundbreaking book on the relationship between subjectivity and the novel, Desire and Domestic Fiction.

A copy of the poster.


November 30
"A Gothic History of the British Novel"
Master seminar
12:00 - 2:00pm
by invitation only

Speaker Nancy Armstrong will conduct a master seminar for faculty and invited graduate students. Assigned reading required prior to day of seminar. Those who would like to join the Master Seminar must contact Jacques Khalip. Seating is limited.


December 3
Invitational Lecture in the Humanities
"Health Inequality: Economics, Ethics and Public Policy"

5:30 - 7:00pm
Pembroke Hall 305

Health outcomes differ markedly across socioeconomic groups within countries and across countries. What drives these health inequalities, and how should societies respond to them? This talk will review evidence on the magnitude and drivers of health inequalities; consider questions about ethical and economic issues that underpin responses to health inequalities; and highlight the value and potential pitfalls of possible policy responses.

The distinguished speaker at the 2012-13 Invitational Lecture in the Humanities is Brown President Christina Paxson.

A copy of the poster.

Visit the photo gallery from this event.

Watch the video of this lecture.




Co-Sponsored Events

September 28-29
"Music Between Nation and Form: Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco and the Boundaries of Italianità"
Conference
Pembroke Hall 305
9:00am - 5:00pm

The conference will investigate the life and work of Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco as placed within the broader context of Italian musical modernity and—after his exile to Hollywood, with the passage of the fascist racial laws in 1938—the musical culture of California; the relationship in 20th-century Italy between music and national identity; the legacies of the Italian musical tradition from the Risorgimento, as well as the relationships between music and other aesthetic practices and forms; and the impact of Jewish culture in modern Italy and the exile community of Hollywood.

Keynote speaker is Leon Botstein, President of Bard College. Panelists include Deborah Amberson, Alessandra Campana, Diana Castelnuovo-Tedesco, John Champagne, Salvatore Champagne, Mila DeSantis, Giuseppe Ficara, Matthew Franke, Axel Körner, Dorothy Lamb Crawford, Assaf Shelleg, Antonella Sisto, and James Westby.


October 11
"Jews in Viennese Popular Culture Around 1900"
Lecture
J. Walter Wilson, Room 301
4:00pm

Scholar of Austrian and Central European Jewish culture, Klaus Hoedl is the speaker.


October 19-20
"Ruptures and Transgressions"
Graduate Student Conference
October 19: John Hay Library, 20 Prospect Street
9:00am - 6:15pm

October 20: Rochambeau House, 84 Prospect Street
9:30am - 5:30pm

The aesthetics of modernity have been governed by a successive series of formal and ideological ruptures which lead to continuous renovation. Furthermore, cultural production has always been derived from transgression, whether it be transgression of social norms or linguistic codes, or its own capacity to confront what is accepted, thus inaugurating new modes of thought.

This conference will initiate a dialogue around the concepts of rupture and transgression, understood in all their connotations: discontinuity, unconformity, fracturing, fragmentation, and the breakdown of precepts in any aesthetic, generic, discursive, or cultural category. Keynote speaker is Vicente Luis Mora, University of Cordoba, and Director of the Cervantes Institute, Marrakesh.

Talks delivered in English and in Spanish. Please consult the conference schedule.


October 20
"What is the Value of a Liberal Education?"
TEDx Seminar
Granoff Center for the Creative Arts
154 Angell Street
12:00 - 6:00pm

This afternoon-long seminar will feature Brown alumni who are leaders in the public and private sectors giving presentations in the dynamic TED format which includes brief, story-driven narratives told before a live audience without a podium or notes. Speakers include Jill Huchital '89, Google; Richard Morrill '61, Teagle Foundation; Katherine Chon '02, The Polaris Project; Nawal Nour, MD '88, Brigham and Women's Hospital; Tom Garner '90, The Motley Fool; Sonja Brookins Santelises '89, Baltimore City Public Schools; Brad Simpson '95, independent film producer; Art Matuziak '99, White House Business Council.


October 26-November 20
"Spillforth"
Exhibit
Granoff Center, Cohen Gallery
154 Angell Street
Opening event (October 26) 5:00 - 7:00pm

An exhibition of glass and ceramic arts by Richard Hirsch and Michael Rogers, with sound work by Gary Schnackenberg, featuring texts by C.D. Wright and Forrest Gander.


October 28
"Neighborhood Concert: Andrew Garland and Warren Jones"
Recital
Grant Recital Hall
105 Benevolent Street
8:00pm

Pianist Warren Jones has played with many singers, including Stephanie Blythe, Kathleen Battle, and Carol Vaness. A prominent teacher, collaborative pianist, and chamber musician, Jones performs at all the main concert halls and festivals around the world. Currently teaching at the Manhattan School of Music, he has also served as assistant conductor at the Metropolitan Opera and San Francisco Opera.

Baritone and Teaching Associate in Brown's Music Department Andrew Garland delivers performances from innovative recital collaborations with living American composers to classic, large-scale productions of Don Giovanni, La bohème, and Carmen. Garland brings drama to the stage today with an adventurous program called “The Quest: Don Quixote and Other Wanderers.”


November 16
"The 'Principle' of Insufficient Reason: Immediate Heidegger"
Lecture
Smith-Buonanno 106
4:00pm

Speaker Jacques Lezra is Professor of Comparative Literature and Spanish, and Chair of the Department of Comparative Literature at NYU. He is a specialist in the literature of the Renaissance and Early Modern period, Cervantes and Shakespeare in particular, and in contemporary political philosophy. He is the author of Wild Materialism: The Ethic of Terror and the Modern Republic (2010) and Unspeakable Subjects: The Genealogy of the Event in Early Modern Europe (1997). Lezra’s 1992 translation into Spanish of Paul de Man's Blindness and Insight won the PEN Critical Editions Award. His forthcoming books are entitled Principles of Insufficient Reason: Mediation and Translation After Marx and Accidental Modernity.


November 27- December 4
"Close Encounters"

November 27
"Jazz at the Intersection of Performing and Visual Arts"
Master class (4:00 - 5:00pm) and performance (7:00 - 8:00pm) by pianist Jason Moran and drummer Charles Haynes

December 3
"Millennial Poetics from the New Garde"
Symposium with poets Kevin Young, Evie Shockley and Terrance Hayes
6:00 - 8:00pm

December 4
"Soundscapes from Late Jazz"
Master class on sonic innovation by pianist Vijay Iyer and hip hop artist Mike Ladd.
6:30 - 8:00pm

All events will take place at Martinos Auditorium, Granoff Center
154 Angell Street.