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Graduate Students

Emily Booker
Andrew Dufton
Pinar Durgun
Laurel Darcy Hackley
Julia Hurley

Karl Krusell
Samantha Lash
Evan Levine
Alex Marko

Kathryn McBride
Matthew Pihokker
Daniel Plekhov
Ian Randall

Miriam Rothenberg
Catherine Steidl
Jennifer Thum
Martin Uildriks

 
Emily Booker
Status: ABD
Emily received a double B.A. in Classical Civilizations and Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations from the University of California, Berkeley (2013). She graduated with high honors for a thesis concerning the socio-economic implications of Cypriot cylinder seals during the Late Bronze Age. Her experience ranges from educational outreach at the San Diego Museum of Man, independent research at the British Museum, ceramic analysis at the American Academy in Rome, and fieldwork on multiple projects, including the Kalavasos and Maroni Built Environments project, Cyprus, the Tayinat Lower Town Project, Turkey, the Dhiban Excavation and Development Project, Jordan, and the Busayra Cultural Heritage Project, Jordan. Her main academic interests lie in international ties, trade, and communication in the eastern Mediterranean, particularly in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age, through a combination of archaeological, art historical, and textual analysis of materials. Her dissertation work focuses on anthropomorphic clay figurines from Cyprus dating to the Late Bronze Age to Early Iron Age, considering issues of local appropriations of foreign influence and conceptions of the human body. Emily is also interested in issues of public outreach and the representation of archaeology in pop culture, particularly in videogames, and how these representations may shape modern public perceptions of the field.

 
Andrew Dufton
Status: ABD
Andrew received a B.A. (Honours) in Anthropology from McGill University in 2003 and went on to complete an M.Sc. in GIS and Spatial Analysis in Archaeology from University College London (2005). He worked for six years in the British commercial sector and was involved in all aspects of archaeological fieldwork: survey, excavation, project management, digital archaeology, and public outreach. During this time he surveyed and developed an online data system for the Villa Magna Project (2006-2010), and was a founding member of the Day of Archaeology (2011-2015). Since coming to Brown, he has participated in fieldwork in Italy, Jordan, Turkey, and Tunisia, and worked on the development of one of the university's first forays into the world of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Andrew's dissertation examines the transition from Iron Age to Roman urbanism in North Africa and draws on modern urban anthropology to ask how the processes of foundation, growth, monumentalization, and renewal impacted the lives of a city's inhabitants. He has also continued his methodological focus on the uses of digital and web technologies for the dissemination of archaeological data and narratives, to both academic audiences and to the wider public.

 
Pınar Durgun
Status: ABD
Pınar graduated from Bilkent University's Archaeology Department in 2010 with High Honors. As an undergraduate, she interned at the Anatolian Civilizations Museum in Ankara (2009) and worked at Kinet Höyük (2008) and Hacimusalar Höyük excavations (2009-2011). In 2012 she received her M.A. in Archaeology and Archaeological Sciences from Koc University's Anatolian Civilizations and Cultural Heritage Management Program. Pınar joined Brown University in 2012 as a Fulbright grantee. For the summer of 2013 she was a member of the Brown University's Yalburt Yaylası project. Recently she has been involved in projects that integrate archaeology, archaeological heritage, and museum studies -- including internships with the Giza Archives Project/Harvard University and University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. She is the current fellow of AIA’s Harriet and Leon Pomerance Fellowship. Pinar’s dissertation examines Bronze Age Anatolian cemeteries in their social context by looking at landscape, mortuary rituals, and memories. Her research interests include bioarchaeology, the prehistory of Anatolia and the Aegean, landscape archaeology, and GIS, as well as museum studies and public archaeology.

 
Laurel Darcy Hackley
Status: Third Year
Darcy received a B.A. in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology from Wellesley College (2007) and a M.A. in Egyptology from the American University in Cairo (2014). She has worked as an illustrator and archaeologist at many sites in Egypt, including the Red Monastery, Sohag, the Temple of Mut, Luxor, the Valley of the Kings, Abydos, and Kharga Oasis. She also excavates at Cadir Hoyuk in Turkey. Darcy’s main research interest is Middle Kingdom Egypt, especially the material culture of the period and the symbolic and religious value of things and materials. She has additional interests in ancient production and technology, international trade in luxury goods, mining and mineral resources, and materials science.

 
Julia Hurley
Status: First Year
Julia received her B.A. (highest honors) in Mediterranean Archaeology, with a minor in Fine Arts, from the University of Pennsylvania (2014).  At Penn, she was a student in the University Scholars research program, culminating in a thesis focusing on developing a new quantitative and spatial approach to studying food in the ancient world. She went on to earn an M.Phil. in Classical Archaeology at the University of Cambridge (2015), completing a thesis entitled “Mapping Food in Iron Age and Roman-Period Britain: An Integrated Approach,” which implemented her proposed methodology using Cambridgeshire as a study area. Julia has worked as an archaeologist and surveyor for the Olynthos Project (Greece), the Roman Peasant Project (Italy), the Gordion Archaeological Project (Turkey), the Roman Binchester Research Project (England), the Iklaina Archaeological Project (Greece), and the Roman Forum of Pollentia Archaeological Project (Spain). She has also worked as an archival intern at the Museum of the University of Pennsylvania, and as a research assistant for the Database of Religious History (University of British Columbia) and for the Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilizations (Harvard University). Her primary research interests are in foodways in the ancient world; Roman social and economic history; the archaeology of the Roman Empire, particularly the western provinces and the cultural interactions therein; environmental history; and digital approaches to studying the ancient world.

 
Karl Krusell
Status: Second Year
Karl completed his B.A. in Classical Studies at Middlebury College in 2011. While at Middlebury, he learned Mandarin well enough to spend a semester in Hangzhou studying Classical Chinese and ancient Chinese history. He also learned how to scuba dive in Middlebury’s pool. Karl then joined the Nautical Archaeology Program at Texas A&M University, where he worked for the Institute of Nautical Archaeology (INA) and conducted research for his M.A., which focused on an assemblage of diagnostic artifacts from the Godavaya shipwreck in Sri Lanka -- the oldest known wreck in the Indian Ocean. His travels have focused on Turkey, where he participated in the underwater excavations of the harbors of “Old Knidos” in Burgaz and worked out of INA’s Bodrum Research Center. Karl’s research interests include ancient shipwrecks, maritime traditions, harbor archaeology, Bronze Age trade, and Greek colonization.

 
Samantha Lash
Status: ABD
Sam graduated with a B.A. in Classical Archaeology (High Honors) with a minor in Biological Anthropology in 2012, and a M.A. in Classical Archaeology IPCAA in 2013 at University of Michigan. Her thesis aimed to reconcile papyrological and archaeological data from a granary in Karanis, Egypt. Sam has worked in the field with the Gabii Project Latium, Italy (since 2010), the Notion Archaeological Survey, Turkey (2014-2015), and the S’Urachi Project, Sardinia (2014-present). Broadly, Sam studies local variability within inferred patterns of land-use, economic systems, and climatic change during the 1st millennium BCE in the Western Mediterranean. Her dissertation focuses on how industrial scale land-use associated with state-driven schema developed as economic and social processes in the mid-1st millennium BCE, how local environmental knowledge and diversified regional practices mitigated risk and environmental impact in the Mediterranean’s fragmented physical landscape, and proposes how broader patterns in climate change may have contributed to the stability of Roman intensification of vulnerable coastal and plain lands towards the end of the millennium. Sam is an affiliate of the Institute at Brown for Environment & Society and pursuing a M.Sc. in Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences through the Open Graduate Program.

 
Evan Levine
Status: First Year
Evan graduated from Kalamazoo College in 2012 with a B.A. in Classics, and received an M.A. (Classics) and M.S. (Geography) from Texas Tech University in 2016. His Master’s thesis, titled “A Geospatial Contextualization of Archaic Greek Epigram on Thasos”, focused on reinterpreting 6th century BCE verse inscriptions from Thasos through a geospatial perspective, and developing new methods for the digital recording and visualization of inscriptions. Evan has excavated in Italy, Jordan, England, Greece, and the United States, and is currently a staff member of the Mazi Archaeological Project, a diachronic landscape survey of borderlands between Attica and Boeotia. In addition to his fieldwork experience, Evan has published on the topics of inscribed Greek epigram, Archaic and Hellenistic Greek poetry, and archaeological methodology.

 
Alex Marko
Status: Second Year
Alex received his B.A. in Anthropology with an Emphasis in Archaeology from the University of Nevada, Reno (2008) and M.A. in Archaeology from the Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies (2013). His Master’s thesis focused on the production and theoretical assessment of 3D reconstructions of domestic and commercial spaces in Pompeii. His thesis work, funded in part by the CIAMS Research Grant, was a component of his eight seasons of work with the University of Cincinnati’s Pompeii Archaeological Research Project: Porta Stabia as an excavator and architectural specialist. Alex has participated in Brown’s Uronarti Regional Archaeology Project (Sudan) and Brown and the University of Michigan’s Notion Archaeological Survey (Turkey). He has also worked in the Cultural Resources Management field, focusing on sites in the American Great Basin and Midwest. Alex served as Field Director for an extensive pedestrian survey of the Virginia City Historic District and for large prehistoric lithic procurement sites throughout Nevada. Alex’s research interests include the spatial analysis of urban contexts, digital documentation and reconstruction, ways of seeing, Pompeii, and architectural analysis.

 
Kathryn McBride
Status: ABD
Kathryn graduated with honors from Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa with a B.A. in History and Ancient Mediterranean Studies in 2006. She studied Egyptology for a semester at the American University in Cairo, and her undergraduate thesis at Coe focused on the ethnic and cultural relationships within Ptolemaic Egypt. She graduated with an M.A. in Classics with an emphasis on archaeology from the University of Arizona in 2008, and her Master's thesis there also concentrated on Egypt, this time on the iconography used by the Ptolemaic Queens. From 2009 to 2011, she taught History and Humanities at Pima Community College in Tucson, Arizona. Kathryn has participated in archaeological projects in Greece, Egypt, Jordan, Turkey, and Israel, and in 2013 she attended the Eric P. Newman Graduate Summer Seminar in Numismatics. Kathryn's main research interests include the frontiers of the Hellenistic and early Roman worlds, cultural conflict and interaction, borderlands, and coinage. She is currently working on research related to the monetary and non-monetary uses of coins in regions just beyond the Roman Empire, and what those practices can tell us about Roman/local interactions.

 
Matthew Pihokker
Status: Second Year
Matthew received a dual B.A. in both Classical Studies and English Literature from The College of New Jersey (2009), and a M.A. in Classics with an emphasis in Archaeology from the University of Arizona (2013). His thesis research focused on landscape archaeology and transportation in the Peloponnese, specifically through applications of GIS in reconstructing the logistics of pilgrimage during the late Classical period. Matthew’s survey and excavation experience throughout Greece has taken him to Athens (Athenian Agora), Arcadia (Mt. Lykaion Excavation and Survey Project) and Boeotia (Eastern Boeotia Archaeological Project), as well as Albania (Vjosë River Valley Archaeological Project) and Montserrat (Survey and Landscape Archaeology on Montserrat). Matthew also has numerous years of professional and post-excavation experience; he managed Arizona’s Archaeological Mapping Lab and worked throughout the Northeast in the Cultural Resource Management field as a GIS technician. In the classroom, he taught Greek History and Latin at The College of New Jersey from 2013-2015. His current research interests involve approaches to survey and digital site documentation, as well as the reconstruction of past patterns of settlement, economy, and exchange throughout the Mediterranean.

 
Daniel Plekhov
Status: First Year
Dan graduated from Dickinson College in 2014 with a B.A. in Archaeology and Classical Studies, and received his M.A. in Archaeology from Boston University in 2016. His undergraduate thesis focused on expressions of ethnic identity in multi-cultural Greek colonies in Sicily, while his Master’s thesis applied architectural energetics models and geospatial analyses to a group of Lydian burial tumuli to study the distribution and organization of labor involved in their construction, as well as their relationship to various topographic and environmental variables. He has excavated in Greece, Israel, and Turkey, and worked on a variety of digital humanities projects focusing on the digitization of print resources and their integration with other digital datasets. His current research focuses on the comparative study of urbanization through geostatistical methodologies, to address effects on local economies and regional mobility.

 
Ian Randall
Status: ABD
Ian received his B.A. in Anthropology in 2005 and M.A. in the Social Sciences in 2009 from the University of Chicago. His M.A. thesis concentrated on the potential of Port St. Symeon Ware, a 13th century Levantine ceramic, to shed light on the changing social landscape of the late Crusader States. He has conducted fieldwork on the island of Gotland in Sweden (2004) at the Viking Age Settlement of Frojel as part of a University of Gotland project, at Abydos in Egypt (2006), working on the early 18th Dynasty temple of Queen Ahmose-Nefertary with a team from the University of Chicago, at Tell Hamoukar in Syria (2010), uncovering Akkadian and Ninevite V industrial levels in the lower town in a joint University of Toronto and University of Chicago excavation, in the Athenian Agora working on the Byzantine levels (2012), and most recently at Idalion and the Late Roman city of Kourion on Cyprus (2014). Ian has also worked in the private sector, conducting excavation and survey at Fatumafuti in American Samoa (2005), in central Illinois (2007), and in North Dakota (2011), where he worked with the Three Affiliated Tribes and the Sioux. His current research focuses on early medieval Cyprus, the transitions that occurred in material culture during the Arab-Byzantine Condominium and the Lusignan Dynasty, and the implications this may have for developing a more nuanced picture of the decision-making processes that shaped group identity. Ian's other interests include GIS, human osteology, postcolonial theory, and ceramic consumption.

 
Miriam Rothenberg
Status: Third Year
Miriam received her B.A. from Oberlin College, having majored in Archaeological Studies and Anthropology, and minored in Geology (2012). She spent a year on a Fulbright scholarship to Durham University, earning an M.A. with a dissertation titled, "Do All Roads Really Lead to Rome? Modelling Mobility in the Ager Veientanus and the Sangro Valley, Italy". Prior to attending Brown, Miriam had fieldwork experience in Colorado, New York, Alaska, England (Binchester/Vinovium), and central Italy (Sangro Valley Project). Recently, she has participated in the Institute-affiliated Survey and Landscape Archaeology on Montserrat, S’Urachi (Sardinia, Italy), and Uronarti (Sudan) projects, as well as the Mazi Archaeological Project (Attica, Greece). Her laboratory and technical experience includes managing Oberlin College’s geomorphology lab, conserving cuneiform tablets at Cornell University, and serving as GIS and paperless database specialist/consultant for various archaeological projects. Miriam’s main research centers on the comparative archaeology of volcanic disasters, with the landscapes affected by the 1995 eruption of the Soufrière Hills Volcano (Montserrat, West Indies) as her primary field site. To this end, she is also studying for an Sc.M. in Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences at Brown University, focusing on geoarchaeology in volcanic landscapes. Her current research interests include contemporary archaeology, geology and geoarchaeology, GIS, paperless recording, and digital materialities.

 
Catherine Steidl
Status: ABD
Catie graduated from Wesleyan University in 2011 with a B.A. in both Archaeology (Honors) and German Studies. Her honors thesis addressed the difficulties with various interpretations of the archaic korai on the Athenian Acropolis, and the possible social implications of their dedication. After graduating from Wesleyan, Catie spent a summer working in the North American Archaeology Lab at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Following this, she spent a year at the University of Tübingen on the Connecticut-Baden-Württemberg Exchange Scholarship, where she studied Latin, Greek, and archaeology. Her field work experience includes work with the Cotsen Institute Pucará Archaeological Project in Peru (2010), the Bucknell University Thebes Synergasia Project (2013-2014) and the Mazi Archaeological Project (2015-) in Greece,  and the Brown-Michigan Notion Archaeological Survey in Turkey (2014-). Catie's dissertation focuses on Greek settlements overseas in the Archaic and Classical periods, examining the processes of community formation in Ionia, southern France, and northeastern Spain through daily practice in domestic and cult contexts. Some of her other interests include connections between the northern and western coasts of Anatolia; constructions of identity in prehistory; revised and evolving approaches to the archaeology of gender; phenomenology; and monumentality.

 
Jennifer Thum
Status: ABD
Jen received her B.A. with Honors in Archaeology from Barnard College (2009), with a thesis focusing on modern viewership of Graeco-Roman mummy portraiture from Egypt. She received her M.Phil. with Distinction in Egyptology from Oxford (2012), where she was a Clarendon Scholar with a dissertation on Late Period sacred animal "reliquaries". Jen has interned at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, and the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. She has excavated with the Megiddo Expedition since 2006, and her other field experience includes work with the Jezreel Valley Regional Project, the NYU Excavations at Amheida, and the Athienou Archaeological Project. In 2015-2016 Jen co-curated "Uncovering Ancient Egypt: Ancient Crafts, Modern Technologies" at Brown's Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology. Jen's dissertation is a study of Egyptian royal living-rock stelae, examined through a combination of landscape archaeology and linguistic anthropology. For her dissertation fieldwork in 2016-2017 she will travel to Egypt, Sudan, and Lebanon with a CAORC Mellon Mediterranean Regional Research Fellowship, an ECA Fellowship from the American Research Center in Egypt, and a SPARC Fieldwork Award.

 
Martin Uildriks
Status: Second Year
In 2008, Martin received his B.A. from the State University of Groningen, focusing on European prehistory, iconographic analyses, and ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern culture. His thesis focused on interrelations in the iconographic repertoires of middle Bronze Age Mediterranean palatial complexes such as those at Knossos (Crete), Alalakh (Turkey), and Tell ed-Dab'a (Egypt). His wide array of coursework and broad interests led him to apply to Leiden University's Master's program to which he was admitted the same year. While this M.A. focused on Near Eastern prehistoric and Bronze Age societies, he was also admitted to the Master's program 'Egyptian Language and Culture' (Egyptology) in 2010. In 2011, he finished both programs (cum laude in Egyptology) and wrote two interlinking dissertations, investigating iconographic evidence for developments in graphic communication from late prehistoric and early historic Egypt. During and after his time in Leiden, Martin taught classes on ancient Egyptian culture and on geodetics, and he worked as a surveyor and a digital specialist with various archaeological and geological projects in the Netherlands, Italy, Greece, Iraq, and Sudan. Martin's academic interests lie in the developments of human cognition and (digital) methodologies, including GIS, 3D and 4D modeling, animation, and deeper forms of structural analyses from these sources.