Full Course Catalog Listing

MCM 0100 - Introduction to Modern Culture and Media
An introduction to key forms that constitute media in modern culture: photography, film, recorded sound, print, television, video, and digital media. We will examine the materials of such media, and produce critical accounts of them as representational forms as well as aesthetic, social, and/or political practices. Our discussions will be structured by major theoretical concepts and approaches. Students MUST register for the lecture section and the screening. A sign up-sheet will be available for conferences after the first class meeting. Open to undergraduates only. LILE

MCM 0150 - Structuralism, Poststructuralism and their Others
An introduction to the theoretical foundations of contemporary cultural criticism. We will study theories of language and representation, image and narrative, signification and textuality, fantasy and ideology, and modernity and postmodernity that are crucial to understanding modern culture and media texts (including literary, photographic, film, television, and digital media). Readings will range from such scholars as Saussure, Levi-Strauss, Marx, and Freud to Barthes, Fanon, Irigaray, and Butler. Students must register for both the lecture section and one conference; a signup sheet will be available for conferences after the first class meeting. Open to undergraduates only. LILE

MCM 0230 - Digital Media
This course introduces students to the study of digital media. Moving from its popular mass forms to alternative artistic installations, from cyberpunk fiction and movies to facebook.com, we will study the aesthetics, politics, history and theory of digital media. Special attention will be paid to its relation to social/cultural formations (gender, sexuality, race, global flows). Students MUST register for the lecture section and the screening. A sign up-sheet will be available for conferences after the first class meeting. LILE.

MCM 0240 - Television Studies
Introduces students to the rigorous study of television, concentrating on televisual formations (texts, industry, audience) in relation to social/cultural formations (gender, generational, and family dynamics; constructions of race, class, and nation; consumerism and global economic flows). That is, this course considers both how television has been defined and how television itself defines the terms of our world. Students MUST register for the lecture section, the screening, and a conference section. Open to undergraduates only. LILE

MCM 0250 - Visuality and Visual Theories
Theories of visual representation in such traditional media as painting, in photography, and in emergent digital media (VR, robotics, etc.). Connects problems of representation to issues of power, information, subjectivity. These media are read as historically constituted and specific to particular cultures through complex forms of mediation. LILE

MCM 0260 - Cinematic Coding and Narrativity
Examination of the structural and ideological attributes of cinema, concentrating on the dominant narrative model developed in the American studio system and alternatives to that model. Emphasis on contemporary theories of cinematic representation. Students become conversant with specific elements and operations of the cinematic apparatus (e. g. camera, editing, soundtrack) and its production of discursive meanings. Students MUST register for the lecture, section and one screening. A sign up-sheet will be available for conferences after the first class meeting. Open to undergraduates only. LILE WRIT

MCM 0700 - Introduction to the Moving Image
The purpose of this course is to provide a basic introduction to film and video production and to begin to consider the kinds of texts that might be produced using these media. Students are expected to work in an intelligent manner, take risks with the content and form, engage in empirical research of the medium, and in so doing, examine common presumptions about media production. Students will utilize 16mm non-sync film cameras and small format video to produce a series of short projects emphasizing the creative use of these media in various social and visual arts contexts. Classes will consist of screenings and discussion of a wide variety of works, basic technical demonstrations, and critiques of student work. No previous production experience necessary. Prerequisites (two of the following or equivalent): MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, 1110. Application required. Enrollment limited to 15. Written permission required. Mandatory S/NC.

MCM 0710 - Introduction to Filmmaking: Time and Form
A studio-style course on working with time based media, focused specifically on the technology of 16mm film production. With its focus on photographic and montage processes, as well as lighting and sound, the principles established in this course provide a solid foundation for all subsequent work in media, whether cinematic, video or new media, and it is strongly advised as a foundation level, skills oriented media course. Students produce a series of short, non-sync films. No previous experience required. Screenings, demonstrations and studio work. Application required. Application is available in the MCM office. Students must bring a completed application to the first class to be considered for admission. Up to 40 students can apply, but the final class list of 15 will be determined after this meeting, with permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. S/NC

MCM 0720 - Intermediate Filmmaking: Cinematic Space
Introduces more sophisticated film production techniques, including sync sound and lighting technique. Explores the influence of digital technologies on cinematic practice. Studio work supplemented by screenings, demonstrations, and discussions. Group and individual projects. Prerequisite: MCM 0710. Application required. Application is available in the MCM office or from http://www.brown.edu/Departments/MCM/. Students must bring a completed application to the first class to be considered for admission. Class list will be posted 2 days after the first class meeting. Enrollment limited to 12. Instructor's permission required. S/NC.

MCM 0730 - Introduction to Video Production: Critical Strategies and Histories
Provides the basic principles of video technology and independent video production through a cooperative, hands-on approach utilizing small format video (Mini DV). Emphasizes video as a critical intervention in social and visual arts contexts. No previous experience required. Application required. Application is available in the MCM office. Students must bring a completed application to the first class to be considered for admission. The final class list will be determined after this meeting, with permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. S/NC.

MCM 0740 - Intermediate Video Production: Sound, Image, Duration
Expanded principles of independent video production utilizing small format video (Mini DV). Emphasizes video as a critical intervention in social and visual arts contexts. A major project (10-20 minutes) and a class presentation concerning your project are required. Prerequisite: MCM 0730. Application required. Application is available in the MCM office or from http://www.brown.edu/Departments/MCM/. Students must bring a completed application to the first class to be considered for admission. Class list will be posted 2 days after the first class meeting. Enrollment limited to 15. Instructor's permission required. S/NC.

MCM 0750 - Digital Art
What would Andy Warhol's Facebook page look like? What would John Cage have done with an iPod? This introductory production course combines history, theory, and practice to explore the intersection of art and emerging digital technologies. Examples of recent student work include a dance performance lit by cell phones, a Dadaist video game, and an exquisite corpse made with Processing, a programming language for artists. We will examine and critique new media projects by various artists, as well as art historical precursors/influences. Students give presentations and produce media art projects. Readings include Walter Benjamin, Hans Magnus Enzensberger, and Jean Baudrillard. Enrollment limited to 40. S/NC LILE

MCM 0760 - Intermediate Digital Media Production
How do technologies enabling new forms of media and communication reconfigure notions of geography, location, speed, presence, community, autonomy, public, private, and one's ability to participate in culture? This class is an exploration of how artists and other cultural producers use these new technologies and new conditions to activate networks, form communities, create access, self-publish, proliferate, draw attention to context, demand agency, redefine property, and develop spaces for exchange and play.

MCM 0780 - Soundtracks: Sound Production and Visual Media
A production course that examines the role of sound in film, video, and installation forms. The listening assignments and visual media screenings will foreground the usage of audio in the works of selected artists/filmmakers. The course also considers works of sound art. Readings by sonic theorists and producers will examine the possibilities of sound production as a key register of modern social and aesthetic experience. Class members should have completed at least one time-based media class. Students are expected to be competent technically. Application required. Application is available in the MCM office. Students must bring a completed application to the first class to be considered for admission. The final class list will be determined after this meeting, with permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. S/NC.

MCM 0790 - This is a Public Service Announcement
This course will examine the broad mission of "public service" media in its various iterations, both in commercial broadcast television, state run television, and in numerous forays by artists and collectives into public space. Students will produce a series of short video and/or installation projects that will explore critically the content and form of the Public Service Announcement and its historical precedents. In addition, the class will also collectively design, shoot, and produce, in collaboration with the RI Department of Education, their own Public Service Announcement that will air on local television stations. This will be a rare opportunity for undergraduate students not only to gain hands-on production experience, but also to think about and exhibit work outside of the University classroom context. Prerequisite: MCM 0700, MCM 0710, MCM 0720, MCM 0730, or MCM 0740.

MCM 0800 - Freshman Seminars in Modern Culture and Media
No description available.

MCM 0800A - Agency and Representation
Agency is one of the most popular concepts across the disciplines today, but its definitions are often far from satisfactory in relation to representational forms such as literature and film. Using both fictional and theoretical texts, this course will examine some common assumptions about agency and develop a range of possible interpretations that will make the term viable in the study of artistic representation. For first year students only.

MCM 0800B - Freshman Seminar on Visuality
An examination of the key texts (from such diverse fields as philosophy, visual arts, cultural studies) which describe the historical transformation of personal and social visual space. We will explore, for example, Renaissance and Cartesian optics, the mechanization of vision in the late nineteenth century and recent hypotheses around machine-centered visuality. For first year students only.

MCM 0800C - Marx, Nietzsche, Freud: History of Theory
Many of the most pressing theoretical issues addressed by contemporary cultural analysis were first investigated in the works of these three ground-breaking intellectuals. This course will survey some of their major works, with attention to such concepts as ideology and the commodity; the will to power and truth in language; the unconscious and sexual difference. For first year students only.

MCM 0800D - Sound for A Moving Image
A production/seminar. An examination of the role of sound in the works of five exemplary artists/filmmakers while we produce sound works for filmic projects. For first year students only.

MCM 0800E - Race and Imagined Futures
Why is race so important to imagining utopian or dystopian futures - to signaling world peace or Malthusian disaster? What do these imaginings tell us about contemporary anxieties over / desire for multiculturalism and globalization? This course responds to these questions by examining speculative, science and utopian fiction and films by African-, Asian- and Euro-American authors/film makers. Readings will be theoretical, as well as literary. Enrollment limited to 20. Students MUST register for the lecture section and the screening.

MCM 0800F - The Face in Cinema
Cinema has always been obsessed with the thematics of the human face. The close-up is most frequently associated with a revelation of intense human signification, with a rendering legible of the face as the signifier of the soul, and with the face as the privileged signifier of individuality, truth, beauty, and interiority as well as the most basic support of intersubjectivity. We will examine the face in the cinema in relation to the star system, theories of desire and affect, and a history of representation of the face (Darwin, Galton, Duchenne, etc.). Films by Dreyer, Hitchcock, Warhol, Wiseman, and others. Students must register for the primary meeting and one film screening. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS.

MCM 0800H - TV/Not TV: Theory and Production
This freshman seminar examines both commercial television and non-commercial media forms, considering the dialogue and/or tensions between them. What are the critical potentials and political stakes of viewing TV and of making independent media? How can we re-write TV's cultural codes by stimulating alternative readings, fostering new interpretive practices, creating different texts, or developing diverse modes and sites of distribution? Combining theory and practice (media studies, televisual and anti-televisual screenings, and simple production assignments using available technologies), this course encourages students to read and critique commercial television through both analysis and their own creative media practices. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS

MCM 0800I - Victim Testimonies
This seminar will explore primarily first person narratives and historical and other accounts that seek to recreate victim's voices (of the Jewish Holocaust, Stalin's terror, the Algerian War, the Rwandan genocide) in order to understand the cultural contexts and narrative styles that fashion victims, shape readers' views of them, and lead us to take some more seriously than others. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS

MCM 0900 - Undergraduate Seminars in Modern Culture and Media
Topics vary from year to year and instructor to instructor. In each section, enrollment is limited to 20. Prerequisite: one previous MCM course (MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, 1110 or equivalent).

MCM 0900A - Cinema and Stardom: Image/Industry/Fantasy
Focuses on the star within the "machinery" of Hollywood cinema: how stars function in the film industry, within cinematic and extra-cinematic texts, and at the level of individual fantasy and desire. Including screenings of films which exploit, foreground, or critique star images, also considers the ideological implications and cultural consequences of stardom.

MCM 0900B - Global Cyberpunk
Examines how cyberpunk functions both as a global phenomenon and as a way to imagine the global. Texts include American science fiction by authors such as Octavia Butler and Neal Stephenson; anime such as Akira and AD Police Force; feature films such as Blade Runner; as well as theoretical texts on globalization, science fiction, and animation.

MCM 0900F - Real TV
This course will investigate the construction of reality on U.S. television, considering not only specific reality genres (news and "magazine" programs, crisis coverage, docudrama, talk and game shows) but the discursive and representational modes that define the "reality" of commercial television as a whole. Issues include: "liveness"; social relevancy"; therapeutic discourse; TV personalities; media simulation; independent television; and new technologies/realisms.

MCM 0900G - Representing the Internet
Investigates popular representations of the Internet (many of which precede the WWW) from cyberpunk to Supreme Court decisions, from mainstream film to Internet map sites. Considers the relationship between representation, ideology, culture, and technology. All written work for the seminar will be digital.

MCM 0901C - Photography/Film/Art
Questions of the nature of the photographic image have come to the fore in some of the most exciting modern art, such as the work of Cindy Sherman and Andy Warhol. In particular, the question of how the photograph relates to film and history has generated important questions about art and media. This course will analyze these questions through the work of such artists as Jeff Wall, Jean-Luc Godard, and Hiroshi Sugimoto. We will examine these in relation to writings that theorize the relationship of photography to film and art after World War Two. Readings include Benjamin, Barthes, and Krauss. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, or 1110. Enrollment limited to 20 undergraduates. WRIT

MCM 0901D - Film Comedy
What makes some films so funny? This course will investigate many different forms of film comedy-- from slapstick physical gags involving hapless men and umbrella-wielding matrons, to eccentric verbal banter, to parodies that subvert state politics using puppet characters. Instead of treating film comedy as “just mindless escapism,” we will study how comedy's complex and slippery devices are central to the history of cinema. Readings in critical discourses about comedy, film history and film theory, e.g. Freud, Bergson, Benjamin, Rob King, Miriam Hansen, and Kathleen Rowe. Screenings range from silent slapstick, to communist satire, to romantic comedy, to political mockumentary.
Enrollment limited to 20 undergraduates. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, or 1110.

MCM 0901E - The Fantastic in Contemporary Cinema
This course addresses the idea of the Fantastic from its definition to its articulations in contemporary cinema. Focusing more on form than on content, we will privilege a reading of the Fantastic as an effect rather than a genre or a theme: specific attention will be given to the relationships between filmic texts, spectatorship and the production of meaning. Screenings will include popular Hollywood cinema as well as European and independent films. We will discuss works by directors such as Lynch, Nolan, Fincher, Spielberg, Gondry, Cronenberg and Haneke. Readings will range from literary theory and psychoanalysis to film theory and semiotics. Enrollment limited to 20 undergraduates. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, or 1110. All others will need written permission from the instructor.

MCM 0901F - "America" in Diaspora Literatures
How have diasporic and immigrant writers come to see the United States? How do these writers negotiate dominant understandings of race, gender, ethnicity, religion, and language that come to define "the nation"? Is all immigrant/minority writing necessarily (auto)biographical? How are notions of history, memory, and futurity taken up by writers of diasporic and hybrid cultures in the US? These are some of the questions that this course will take up through a close reading of canonical and contemporary African-American, South/Asian-American, and Arab-American texts. This course is ideal for students interested in minority literatures, diaspora studies, and Ethnic Studies.

MCM 1110 - The Theory of the Sign
A survey of three theorists: Louis Althusser, Jacques Derrida, and Michel Foucault. Readings range from Althusser's Reading Capital to Foucault's History of Sexuality. Discussion focuses on these figures as they emerge from/intervene in the field of semiotics, with particular attention to the developments in each oeuvre and the differences among them. Prerequisite - one of the following: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, 1110.

MCM 1200 - Special Topics in Modern Culture and Media
Topics vary from year to year and instructor to instructor. In each section, enrollment is limited to 50. Written permission given after the first meeting. Prerequisite: one previous Modern Culture and Media course.

MCM 1200D - African Cinema
Subsaharan African cinemas 1960-present, primary emphasis on narrative films. We will analyze cultural and aesthetic strategies, (cinematic style, narrative, and subjects). in the context of postcolonial African and international film histories. Themes include: anticolonial resistance/nationalist ideologies; third cinema/international art cinemas; oral aesthetic culture and cinematic style; political critique (e.g., gender, state politics); media globalizationand resistence; the struggle for a mass audience. Enrollment limited to 50. Previous coursework in MCM, Africana Studies, or related areas highly recommended.

MCM 1200G - Cinema and Stardom: Image/Industry/Fantasy
This course focuses on the role of the star within the "machinery" of Hollywood: how stars function in the film industry, within cinematic and extra-cinematic texts, and at the level of individual fantasy and desire. The paradoxes posed by stars--represented as like yet unlike us, public yet privately known, commodities yet (super)human--suggest complex formations and implications of the star system. We will read film theories and histories and investigate films in which star images are foregrounded to explore these issues. Enrollment limited to 50 undergraduates. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0260, or 1110, or instructor permission. Students MUST register for the lecture section and the screening.

MCM 1200K - Hollywood as Global Cinema
Commonly treated as a U.S. national cinema, Hollywood film has long been a global institution dominating worldwide distribution. We reread U.S. narrative filmmaking and its products in relation to its global ambitions. Topics include: internationalizing the history of U.S. cinema; rethinking theories of the classical and anticlassical text; local, national and global spectatorship; concepts of cultural imperialism and cultural globalization; etc.

MCM 1200Q - Publicity and Surveillance
Investigates the converging technologies and practices of publicity and surveillance. Considers phenomena such as webcams, face recognition technology and networked art, as well as concepts such as enlightenment, paranoia and exhibitionism. Theoretical, historical and legal readings.

MCM 1201C - Imagined Networks, Glocal Connections
This course examines emergent "imagined networks" (anti-globalization activists, youtubers, second lifers, NGOs) fostered by new media technologies and applications. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the changing relationship between the local and the global, and how "glocal" phenomena affect national and personal identities. Readings will be theoretical, historical, political and literary. Enrollment limited to 50 sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Prerequisite - one of the following: MCM 0100, MCM 0150, MCM 0230, MCM 0240, MCM 0250, MCM 0260, MCM 1110.

MCM 1201K - Queer Relations: Aesthetics and Sexuality (ENGL 1900R)
Interested students must register for ENGL 1900R S01 (CRN 16779).

MCM 1201N - Advanced Written and Oral French (FREN 1510)
Interested students must register for FREN 1510 S01.

MCM 1201O - Global Media/Global War
The 20th Century has been called the age of total war. Alongside the globalized military conflicts of the past 100 years is a corresponding globalization of visual media technologies. This course is a study of the links between the technologies, strategies, tactics and technologies of the military and those of various media industries. Topics include "target markets"; flight simulators; Google Earth; "the logistics of military perception;" the bombing of television and radio stations in Serbia and Iraq; the global presence of U.S. military bases and their role in the Americanization of global culture; and Michael Bay's Pentagon contracts. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, or 1110. Enrollment limited to 50. First year students require instructor permission.

MCM 1201P - Freedom in Africana Political Thought (AFRI 1020B)
Interested students must register for AFRI 1020B S01.

MCM 1201R - Music and Modern Life (MUSC 1920)
Interested students must register for MUSC 1920 S01.

MCM 1201T - Russian Cinema (RUSS 1250)
Interested students must register for RUSS 1250 S01.

MCM 1201W - Modernity, Italian Style (ITAL 1030A)
Interested students must register for ITAL 1030A S01 (CRN 16787).

MCM 1201X - Global Media: History, Theory, Production (INTL 1800N)
Interested students must register for INTL 1800N S01 (CRN 20444).

MCM 1201Y - Reading Michel Foucault
This course will explore Foucault's work and impact primarily through his own writings, but also by exploring the transformation his thought has effected on tradtional ways of approaching state and society, the body, social discipline, and a number of other areas of study. In short, this course seeks to put his work in the context of ideas he meant to challenge and how those challenges have been met and incorporated in current thought about politics, society, and culture. We will follow Foucault's trajectory from what he termed "archaeology" to "geneaology." Prerequisites: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260 or 1110. Enrollment limited to 50 Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors.

MCM 1201Z - On Being Bored (ENGL 1511L)
Interested students must register for ENGL 1511L S01.

MCM 1202A - The Poetics of Confession (ENGL 1561J)
Interested students must register for ENGL 1561J S01 (CRN 26582).

MCM 1202B - Literature and Politics (ENGL 1900D)
Interested students must register for ENGL 1900D S01 (CRN 26519).

MCM 1202C - Camera Works: The Theory and Fiction of Photography (ENGL 1900V)
Interested students must register for ENGL 1900V S01 (CRN 26589).

MCM 1202D - China Through the Lens: History, Cinema and Critical Discourse (EAST 1270)
Interested students must register for EAST 1270 S01 (CRN 16635).

MCM 1202E - Extreme Asian Cinema: Contemporary Genre Cinemas in an East Asian Context
Since the late 1990's, a discourse of "extreme Asian cinema" has gained traction among aficionados of global cinema, transforming our understandings of "national cinema." In this course, we will interrogate the spectacular aesthetics of "extremity," with its violence, polymorphous perversion, and grotesquerie, in relation to social and cultural phenomena in contemporary East Asia. By analyzing the genres of the gangster film, the revival of wuxia (heroic martial arts genre) and samurai films, horror, revenge films, and techno-dystopia and ecological disaster anime, we will explore "extreme Asian cinema," as a response to cultural shifts in global identities and film experience. Enrollment limited to 50 sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

MCM 1500 - Senior Seminars in Modern Culture and Media
Preference given to seniors in any of the MCM concentrations. In each section, enrollment is limited to 20. Written permission will be given after the first meeting. Prerequisite: two Modern Culture and Media courses.

MCM 1500C - Archaeology of Multimedia
A historical and theoretical study of "multimedia" from magic lanterns to the Internet. Examines the ways in which media have always been multiple and have always impacted on each other, as well as the ways that various media discourses constitute an "archive" of the knowable and sayable.

MCM 1500D - Contemporary Film Theory
Major arguments in film theory from the late 1960s to the present, contextualized by contemporaneous intellectual tendencies and selected films. Some key issues: cinematic specificity and signification, the politics of form and style, subjectivity/spectatorship, gender/sexuality, postmodern media, digital theory and cinema. Readings from figures such as Baudry, Bordwell, Deleuze, Doane, Elsaesser, Gunning, M. Hansen, Heath,, Jameson, Koch, Manovich, Metz, Mulvey, Pasolini, Rodowick, L. Williams, Willemen, Wollen, etc. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite: one MCM core course. Preferences given to juniors, seniors, and graduate students. All others seeking permission, must attend the first class.

MCM 1500J - Feminist Theory and the Problem of the Subject
Readings in contemporary feminist theory and 20th-century theories of subjectivity. Topics include interpellation, modes of address, apostrophe, positionality; texts include Butler, Haraway, Spillers, Spivak. Previous work in feminist theory strongly recommended.

MCM 1500K - Film and the Avant-Garde
An examination of film's historical relations with various avant-garde movements from surrealism, French Impressionism, German Expressionism, and Dadaism to the theoretically informed independent film of the 1970s and beyond. However, the goal of the course is not a historical survey but the investigation of various conceptualizations of "avant-gardism" and its relation to modernity, mass-culture, and technology.

MCM 1500L - Film Theory
Major positions in the history of film theory, contextualized by both contemporaneous filmmaking and intellectual approaches (phenomenology, Marxism, structuralism/poststructuralism, feminism, etc.) Key issues include: cinematic specificity, cinematic representation and the real, the politics of form and style, cinema and language, subjectivity and spectatorship, film and postmodern "media." Readings in Munsterberg, Arnheim, Kracauer, Bazin, Balazs, Metz, Heath, Mulvey, Williams.

MCM 1500O - From Classical Film Theory to Cinema Semiotics
Readings from earliest film theory through the emergence of cinema semiotics, with awareness of contemporaneous filmmaking and underlying intellectual tendencies. Some key issues: cinematic specificity and relations to other media; the politics of cinema; filmic representation and the real; cinema, modernity, and modernism; mass culture debates; cinema, language and signification. Readings drawn from Adorno, Arnheim, Bazin, Benjamin, Bergson, Debord, Eco, Eisenstein, Epstein, Kracauer, Lukács, Merleau-Ponty, Metz, Munsterburg, Pasolini, Sartre, Wollen, etc. Enrollment limited to 20. Previous work in MCM or related topics required. All others seek permission from the instructor after the first class meeting. Students MUST register for the lecture section and the screening.

MCM 1500S - In the Public's Eye: Publicity and Surveillance
Investigates the converging technologies and practices of publicity and surveillance. Considers phenomena from the paparazzi to digital surveillance, from the commodification of privacy to reality television, in order to analyze this convergence's impact on theories of public sphere. Theoretical and historical readings. Class hours include viewing time.

MCM 1500X - Middlemarch and the Sopranos
The world of The Sopranos has been called "a postmodern Middlemarch, whose inhabitants' moral and spiritual development (or devolution) unfolds within a parochial social milieu." This course offers a comparative analysis of Eliot's 1871-72 novel and HBO's (continuing) television drama, juxtaposing these two very popular, very powerful serializations in formal, thematic, ideological and narrative terms.

MCM 1501B - Nation and Identity: The Concept of National Cinema
Comparative study of constructions of nationhood in films and written texts about cinema. Interrogation of the discursive, political and epistemological power achieved by different version of the concept "national cinema" and the kinds of collective identities they imagine, from early cinema to globalized media. Readings by theorists, historians and filmmakers. Screenings from pertinent contexts (e.g. Weimar Germany, U.S. classical cinema, Japanese 1930s, third cinema, New German Cinema, New Chinese cinema, multinational corporate cinema, etc.)

MCM 1501C - National Cultures/Global Media Spheres
Contemporary cultural practices and media processes are often described as being implicated in "globalization," but this is a linkage that may well predate the present. This course examines theoretical, historical, and critical texts that conceive of media culture through notions of globalization, with attention to the status of nation and cultural identity in a transnational context.

MCM 1501I - Reading Marx
What is it to read Marx now? We will begin with a group of key texts written by Marx drawn from different points in his development, including the first volume of Capital. We will study influential later reinterpretations and commentaries on Marx that argue for his contemporary importance (e.g., Althusser, Balibar, Benjamin, J. Butler, Derrida, Haraway, Hardt, Negri, Zizek, etc.

MCM 1501K - Seeing Queerly: Queer Theory, Film, Video
While cinema has typically circumscribed vision along (hetero) sexually normative lines, can film also empower viewers to see "queerly"? How do we, as sexual subjects (gay and straight), "look" in the cinema, in both senses of the word? How have sexual desires been portrayed across film history, and how might audiences wield the look, appropriating or creating imagery with which to (re)formulate subjectivity and sexuality? This course addresses such questions as it considers both "mainstream" and "alternative" productions. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors and graduate students. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0260, or 1110, or instructor permission. Students MUST register for the lecture section and the screening.

MCM 1501N - Television Time and Space
Explores television's temporal and spatial construction, considering how television demarcates time (regulating it through flow and segmentation, articulating work and leisure times, marking familial and national events, encouraging rhythms of reception) and space (mapping public and private space, defining a "global media culture" through local viewings, representing and enacting travel and exchange, creating imaginary geographies and communities).

MCM 1501O - Television, Gender, and Sexuality
This course investigates how television produces and reproduces constructions of gender and sexuality through its institutional form (as it maps relations between the public and the private, the domestic and the social, the inside and the outside), narrative patterns (as it circulates family romances, links gender and genre, and mediates sexual and social tensions), and spectatorial relations (as it variously addresses viewers as sexed and gendered subjects, consumers and commodities, familial and defamiliarized viewers). Open to undergraduate and graduate students. Prerequisite: one of the following: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, 1110, or instructor permission. Students MUST register for the primary meeting and the screening.

MCM 1501Q - The Close-Up: Theory and Practice
An examination of the use of the close-up in film and theory, from the "primitive" cinema to IMAX and from Münsterberg to Aumont and Deleuze. Special attention to the way in which the close-up has been associated insistently with the face and its heightened cultural significance, with the advent of a "cinematic language," and with questions of cinematic space and scale.

MCM 1501W - The Rhetoric of New Media
An examination of contemporary theories and practices of "new media," but in particular cyberspace; investigates the ways in which information technologies are challenging our inherited ideas about knowledge and ethics. All written work for the seminar will be digital. Application required. Occasional screenings to be announced during semester.

MCM 1502B - Publicity and Surveillance
Investigates the converging technologies and practices of publicity and surveillance. Considers phenomena such as webcams, face recognition technology and networked art, as well as concepts such as enlightenment, paranoia and exhibitionism. Theoretical, historical and legal readings.

MCM 1502C - Race And/As Spectacle
Theoretical and historical examination of race and/as spectacle, from 19th century world fairs and exhibitions to 20th century media events. Focuses on the productive relationship between race and media, from early cinema to the Internet.

MCM 1502E - Theories of the Photographic Image
Examines the history of attempts to assimilate the photographic image to a theory of representation. Will analyze theories of photography, chronophotography, film with respect to issues of time, subjectivity, historicity, the archive. Will also address the rise of the digital image and its potential threat to photography. Readings in Kracauer, Benjamin, Bourdieu, Barthes, Batchen, Marey, Bazin, Aumont and others.

MCM 1502H - Information, Discourse, Networks
Examines the historical emergence of information in relation to language and networks more broadly defined. Some key issues: the rise of new media, cyborgs and other post-human beings, the intersections between post-structuralism and cybernetics and between computer and human languages, and networked multitudes. Readings from Friedrich Kitler, Jacques Derrida, Norbert Wiener, Williams Burroughs, Felix Guattari and Gilles Deleuze. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors and graduate students. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0260, or 1110, or instructor permission. Students MUST register for the lecture section and the lab.

MCM 1502J - Race as Archive
Examination of the importance of race to the logic and practice of biological, technological and cultural archives. Engaging the similarities and differences between the categorization of race in these fields, the course will focus on race as a justification for archives more broadly, and race as an archival trace "evidence" of a biological or cultural history. Readings will be theoretical, historical and literary. Preferences given to students in Modern Culture and Media, Art-Semiotics, Modern Culture and Media- German, Modern Culture and Media-Italian, Semiotics-French, Ethnic Studies, and Science & Technology Studies. All others seek permission from the instructor.

MCM 1502K - Real TV
How does television bring "real" events to us? How do we know what's "real"? What kinds of "realities" exist on television, and how do they operate (in relationship to one another, to TV fantasy, and to our everyday lives)? This course will consider not only some specific "reality genres" (news, catastrophe coverage, "surveillance programming," documentary and docudrama, talk and game shows, reality series and "docu-soaps") but the representational modes that define the reality of commercial television as a whole. Issues to be addressed include: TV "liveness," crisis and scandal, therapeutic discourses, "surveillance society," media simulation, realism and anti-realism, civic and commercial discourses, and television's construction of history and knowledge. Preference given to graduate students, seniors, and juniors in Modern Culture & Media and Art-Semiotics. Prerequisites - two of the following: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, 1110. Interested students who cannot pre-register should come to the first day of class for an application for admission by instructor permission.

MCM 1502N - Derrida and Telecommunications
Derrida famously proclaimed that writing preceded speech¿rendering all communications a form of writing¿but he also argued that the history of psychoanalysis would have been different if Freud had used e- instead of snail-mail. Tracing Derrida's thought re. telecommunications from Grammatology to Writing Machines, as well as engaging his interlocutors (Samuel Weber, Avital Ronell, etc.), this course examines the importance of medium-specificity to post-structuralism. Prerequisite - two of the following: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, 1110. Preferences given to juniors and seniors in Modern Culture and Media, Art-Semiotics, Modern Culture and Media-German, Modern Culture and Media-Italian, Semiotics-French, Science Studies, Anthropology, Comparative Literature, English, Gender Studies, and Philosophy. All other seek permission from the instructor.

MCM 1502P - Nation and Identity in Cinema
Comparative study of constructions of nationhood in films, different cinematic strategies, and written texts about cinema. We will examine the discursive, political and epistemological power achieved by different versions of the concept of "national cinema" and the kinds of collective identities they imagine, from early cinema to current globalized media. Readings by theorists, historians and filmmakers. Screenings from pertinent contexts (for example, Weimar Germany, U.S. classical cinema, Japanese 1930s, third cinema, New German Cinema, New Chinese cinema, multinational corporate cinema, etc). Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors and graduate students. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0260, or 1110, or instructor permission. Students MUST register for the lecture section and the screening.

MCM 1502T - Film Noir: Femmes Fatales, Urban Space, and Paranoia
An examination of film noir, concentrating on the classic films of the 1940s and 1950s, but also investigating film noir's relation to German Expressionism as well as remakes and reincarnations of the genre such as Blade Runner. We will discuss various methodologies: psychoanalysis, ideological analysis, close textual analysis, the historiography of noir. Films by Lewis, Tourneur, Wilder, Hawks, Lang, Pabst, Welles, Preminger, Hitchcock, Ray. Readings in Copjec, Zizek, Naremore, Dimendberg, Vernet, Jameson. Enrollment limited to 20. Primarily for MCM senior concentrators and MCM graduate students; other qualified students must obtain permission from the instructor.

MCM 1502U - Media and Memory: Representing the Holocaust
The Holocaust has been described as unimaginable, at the limits of representation. Yet there have been numerous attempts to imagine and represent it, across media (film, television, graphic novels), genres (documentary, melodrama, comedy, fantasy), and modalities (through history and memory, "high" and "low" culture, fiction and nonfiction, reporting and marketing). Considering such attempts to represent the unrepresentable and "mediate" the immediacy of trauma, this course will explore media texts and theoretical/philosophical reflections on the Holocaust. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite: one of the following: MCM 0100, MCM 0150, MCM 0230, MCM 0240, MCM 0250, MCM 0260, MCM 1110. Preferences given to juniors, seniors, and graduate students. All others seek permission from the instructor.

MCM 1502V - Theories of the Body and the Limits of Constructionism
Scholars currently argue that cultural constructionism went too far, that theories of subjectivity that dominated the academy for over two decades neglected the materiality of the body. We will examine these criticisms as well as what it means to theorize the body. Readings include Merleau-Ponty (phenomenology), Freud and Dolto (psychoanalysis), Damasio (neurology), Fausto-Sterling (biology), Butler, Grosz, Kirby, Moore, Wilson, etc. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite: one related MCM course.

MCM 1502X - Race and/as Technology
This course asks: to what extent can race be considered a technology? That is, not an identity that is true or false, but rather a technique that one uses, even as one is used by it? Ranging from contemporary cyborgs to early 20th century eugenics, it investigates what race does, regardless of what we think it is. Readings will be theoretical, historical and literary. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors and graduate students. All other seek permission from the instructor. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, or 1110.

MCM 1502Y - Simulation Speed Implosion: Theories of Media Technology
Jean Baudrillard and Paul Virilio are generally regarded as two of media studies most notorious pessimists and hyperbolists. Yet they are also theorists who treat the media as technological systems that transcend the traditionally held boundaries of the cultural, economic, social and political. This course will place Baudrillard and Virilio in a context of media theory and technology studies rooted in the work of Harold Innis and Marshall McLuhan while demonstrating important differences between these figures. We will engage in close readings of Baudrillard's and Virilio's major works as well as some of the writings of their interlocutors. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors and graduate students. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, or 1110.

MCM 1502Z - Art Cinema and Its Legacy
Art cinema is associated with directors who achieved international prominence after World War II, with unconventional narrative films that were understood as expressions of original artistic subjectivities and film movements like the French New Wave (e.g., Antonioni, Bergman, Fellini, Godard, Resnais, and many others). Art cinema defined how many imagined non-Hollywood cinema in a global context, but was neither avant-garde nor necessarily political. Its legacy persists to the present, for example, in the reception of recent Iranian cinema and New Taiwanese cinema. We will study its aesthetic and textual strategies, its significance in global film history, and its theoretical implications. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, or 1110.

MCM 1503A - The Ethics of Romanticism (ENGL 1560Y)
Interested students must register for ENGL 1560Y S01.

MCM 1503B - Jane Austen and George Eliot (ENGL 1560A)
Interested students must register for ENGL 1560A S01.

MCM 1503C - "Terrible Beauty": Literature and the Terrorist Imaginary (ENGL 1760I)
Interested students must register for ENGL 1760I S01.

MCM 1503D - W. G. Sebald and Some Interlocutors (ENGL 1761Q)
Interested students must register for ENGL 1761Q S01 (CRN 26515).

MCM 1503E - Aesthetic Theory/Cultural Studies
Aesthetic thought has a long and varied history, but aesthetic categories have only recently become a central concern of cultural studies. This course combines readings in the history of aesthetics and aesthetic education; twentieth-century work on aesthetics from various philosophical and disciplinary perspectives (from “aesthetic theory” and the “anti-aesthetic” to “a return to aesthetics”); and recent scholarship addressing (while not necessarily celebrating) the reemergence of aesthetic questions in cultural and media studies and the evolving relationship of the aesthetic to categories such as ideology, form and virtuality. Readings from Schiller and Kant to Adorno, Berube, Foster, Galloway, Ranciere and Spivak. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, or 1110. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. Instructor permission required.

MCM 1503F - Critical Methodologies: Contemporary Literary Theory (ENGL 1900I)
Interested students must register for ENGL 1900I S01 (CRN 27039).

MCM 1503G - Representations of Suffering in History and Media
This course will explore accounts of suffering in works on slavery, genocide, as well as extra-legal violence (lynching, gay bashing) in order to explore debates about the representation of violence and the use of new technologies of representation. Readings include historians, critical and legal theorists, and journalists. We will also explore recent debates around images of suffering and the reemergence of "shame" as a topic in the context of combatting violence and asserting identity in queer theory. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors and graduate students. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, or 1110, or instructor permission.

MCM 1503H - Literature and the Ideology of the Aesthetic (ENGL 1950B)
Interested students must register for ENGL 1950B S01 (CRN 26963).

MCM 1503I - Digital Media and Race: Ethnicity, Technicity, Embodiment
Are we becoming post-racial in the digital age? This course questions what constitutes "race" through exploration of the ways technology affects identity. Turning to examples from new media art, World of Warcraft, cyborgs and cyberculture, the role of race in the "natural" body, and the formation of identity in online communities, we will explore the relationship between race and digital media. We draw upon critical race theory, critical theories of new media and technology, postcolonial theory and posthumanism to provide a clear and nuanced understanding of race and identity, situating it within the digital culture of our increasingly virtual world. Prerequisite: MCM 0100, 0150, 0230, 0240, 0250, 0260, or 1110. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors.

MCM 1700 - Seminars in Production
Topics vary from year to year and instructor to instructor. In each section, enrollment is limited to 20. Written permission given after the first meeting.

MCM 1700A - Approaches to Digital Cinema
An advanced seminar for students of film and video production. Examines the impact of digital technologies on the forms and practices of time-based media. A production seminar in which students undertake a semester-long project. Requires technical competence and completion of an intermediate level production class. Projects may include digital films, video, installations, and other media-based works. Application required.

MCM 1700B - Approaches to Narrative
A production seminar for intermediate to advanced students in film and/or video production. Students complete a substantial media project in the course of the semester. Class meetings will focus on close readings and critical feedback of students' work during all phases of production. Texts related to narrative theory and production will be discussed. Screenings of exemplary works will supplement the class. Class members should have completed at least one time-based media class. Students are expected to be competent technically. An application will be completed during the first class session and the final class list will be determined after this meeting, with permission of the instructor. S/NC

MCM 1700D - Reframing Documentary Production: Concepts and Questions
An advanced seminar for students of video and/or film production. Focuses on the critical discussion and production of documentary. A major project (10-20 minutes) and in-class presentations of work-in-progress required. Readings on the theory and practice of the form and selective screenings augment the presentation of student work. Class members should have completed at least one time-based media class. Students are expected to be competent technically. Application required. Application is available in the MCM office. Students must bring a completed application to the first class to be considered for admission. The final class list will be determined after this meeting, with permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. S/NC.

MCM 1700J - Tv/Tv: Commercial and Alternative Television
Given the centrality of commercial television in our culture, what possibilities exist for independent television viewing and/or independent television production? How might we re-write TV, either by stimulating alternative readings and new interpretive practices or by creating alternative texts and new modes of transmission? Combining theory and practice (television studies and video production), this course will encourage students to critique commercial television through both media analysis and their own video work. Enrollment limited to 20. Preference given to advanced students (graduate students, seniors, juniors) in Modern Culture & Media, Art-Semiotics, MCM German, MCM Italian, Semiotics French and Visual Arts. Prerequisites: any two previous MCM courses. Interested students who cannot pre-register should come to the first day of class to fill out an application for admission by instructor permission.

MCM 1700M - Techniques of Surveillance
In the decades since George Orwell wrote 1984, Big Brother has evolved from a menacing specter of government power into a form of entertainment--a reality TV show that makes a game of the camera's watchful eye. Yet from NSA wiretapping to Facebook, our images and words are relentlessly tracked and profiled. This production seminar investigates surveillance as an object of cultural fascination and as a means of production in cinema, television, social software, and media art. Students give presentations and produce media art projects. Readings include Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, and Laura Mulvey. Enrollment limited to 20. S/NC LILE

MCM 1700N - Open Source Culture
Where do we draw the line between sampling and stealing? What would it mean to call a urinal a work of art? This production seminar explores the tension between artistic appropriation and intellectual property law, considering open source software as a model for cultural production. We will trace a history of open source culture from Cubist collage and the Readymades of Marcel Duchamp through Pop art and found footage film to Hip Hop and movie trailer mashups. Students give presentations and produce media art projects. Readings include Rosalind Krauss, Nicholas Bourriaud, and Paul D. Miller aka DJ Spooky. Enrollment limited to 40. S/NC LILE

MCM 1700P - Radical Media
Walter Benjamin wrote that in the age of mechanical reproduction art ceases to be based on ritual and "begins to be based on another practice--politics." What is the relation between art and politics in an age of digital distribution? This course explores the nexus of media production and political action from the films of Sergei Eisenstein to WikiLeaks. Students give research-based presentations and produce media art projects. Readings include Guy Debord, Michel de Certeau, Hakim Bey. Enrollment limited to 40. S/NC LILE

MCM 1700Q - Approaches to Media Form
A production seminar for advanced students, organized around the completion of a substantial film or video project. Screenings and discussions will emphasize alternative approaches to media practice. Students will conduct a series of presentations on their own work as it progresses. Intermediate level production class required. Application required. Applications (available at the MCM department) should be completed and returned by, October 10, 2008. Decisions will be posted on the MCM office door at the beginning of pre-registration. Enrollment limited to 20. Instructors permission required. S/NC. Students MUST register for the lecture section and the screening.

MCM 1700R - The Art of Curating
It is sometimes said in contemporary art circles that curators are the new artists. Curating involves a wide range of activities, including research, selection, commissioning, collaboration with artists, presentation, interpretation, and critical writing. This production seminar considers curatoriaI practice as a form of cultural production, paying particular attention to questions of audience, ethical responsibitity, and institutionaI context. Students give presentations, develop exhibition proposals, and curate exhibitions. Visiting curators present case-studies on recent projects. Readings include Pierre Bordieu, Douglas Crimp, and Boris Groys. Enrollment limited to 20. S/NC. LILE

MCM 1700S - Narrative and Immersion
A production course examining the potentials for engagement in new media installations. The course draws on techniques of narrative to establish engagement in immersive environments. Students will be introduced to cinematic concepts, interactive technologies, multi-channel video and surround sound environments. Classes meetings will consist of viewing and analysis of exemplary work, discussion of readings, and critiques of student projects. An additional 1-hour technical workshop will be devoted to learning Jitter. Class members should have completed advanced work in film/video, digital sound, and/or creative writing. Open to upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students. The final class list will be determined after the first class meeting, by permission of instructor. S/NC

MCM 1970 - Directed Research: Modern Culture and Media
Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

MCM 1990 - Honors Thesis/Project in Modern Culture and Media
Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Eighth semester students only

MCM 2100 - Studies in Cultural and Social Theory
No description available.

MCM 2100A - Contemporary Feminist Theory and the Problem of the Subject
Recent feminist theory represents the persistence of identity politics and the problem of the subject in various forms: through the "intersectionality" of race, class and gender; in the idioms of psychoanalysis; in terms of the "queer" subject. We will examine these often conflicting theories and the subjects of feminism they invoke with particular attention to the modes of address.

MCM 2100B - Criticism and Culture in Marxist Theory
Major texts and arguments in 20th century Western Marxist cultural theory, from Lukács through the present. Focus on problems in the conception and reading of culture and cultural texts. Where appropriate, consideration of interaction with other major theoretical frameworks (e.g., aesthetics, phenomenology, semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminism, postcolonial criticism, globalization theory, etc.). Enrollment limited to 20 graduate students. Permission required for undergraduates only.

MCM 2100G - Freud and Lacan
Readings of major texts by Freud and Lacan will stress the relations between language, subjectivity and sexuality and the feminist use and/or critique of psychoanalytic concepts. We will also look at texts by other theorists (e.g. Melanie Klein, Heinz Kohut) and investigate the clinical implications of various approaches. Familiarity with semiotic and poststructuralist theory required. Enrollment limited to 20. Primarily for MCM graduate students; other qualified graduate students and MCM seniors must obtain permission from the instructor.

MCM 2110 - Studies in Textual and Critical Theory
No description available.

MCM 2110B - Freud and Lacan
This course will stress the relations between language, subjectivity and sexuality and the feminist use and/or critique of psychoanalytic concepts. Familiarity with semiotic and poststructuralist theory required. Additional readings in Laplanche, Weber, Zizek, Gallop, Butler.

MCM 2110E - The Reading Effect and the Persistence of Form (ENGL 2900M)
Interested students must register for ENGL 2900M S01 (CRN 17317).

MCM 2120 - Studies in Media Theory
No description available.

MCM 2120A - Media Archaeology
Provides an intellectual history of "Media Archaeology," focusing on contributions by the "SophienstraBe" departments of Humboldt University in Berlin and on the importance of Marshall McLuhan and Michel Foucault, amongst others, to its development. Readings by Friedrich Kittler, Wolfgang Erst, Cornelia Vismann.

MCM 2120B - New Media Theory
An interdisciplinary investigation of "New Media Theory," bringing together historically significant texts from the fields of media, film, literary, music, visual, HCI and cultural studies, with more recent texts in new media studies. As well as exposing students to the canon (from hypertext theory to software studies, HCI to media archaeology), the course will also address the question: what is at stake in the creation of this canon and this discipline? Preferences given to Seniors and Graduate Students in Modern Culture and Media, Art-Semiotics, Modern Culture and Media-German, Modern Culture and Media-Italian, Semiotics-French, English, Comparative Literature, German, Literary Arts, Music, and Science and Technology Studies. All others seek permission from the instructor.

MCM 2120C - Cinema, State Violence and the Global
Theoretical and political conceptions of state and global violence posed against the theory and history of cinema, as representational apparatus and as instruction. Special attention to the establishment of film as global medium around World War I; current issues around the global, state, and biopower; "postmodern media culture;" etc. Readings from sociopolitical theorists (e.g. Weber, Schmitt, Arendt, Foucault, Agamben, Hardt and Negri, etc.) and media scholars/theorists (e.g. Virillio, Prince, L. Williams, Miller, etc.) Enrollment limited to 20. Permission required for undergraduates only.

MCM 2120D - Derrida and Telecommunications
Derrida famously proclaimed that writing preceded speech--rendering all communications a form of writing--but he also argued that the history of psychoanalysis would have been different if Freud had used e-instead of snail-mail. Tracing Derrida's thought re. telecommunications from Grammatology to Writing Machines, as well as engaging his interlocutors (Samuel Weber, Avital Ronell, etc.), this course examines the importance of medium-specificity to post-structuralism. Enrollment limited to 20 graduate students. Permission required for undergraduates only.

MCM 2120E - Cinema, Media Culture and Political Theory: Rancière and Others
There is a strand of contemporary thinkers concerned with political theory, in whose writings media and especially film play significant roles. Jacques Rancière has produced a major body of work on political theory, on aesthetics, and on film as well as media culture. This class will focus on a close examination of his political theory, his conceptions of film and media, and relations between the two fields in his writings. For comparison, we will also look at smaller samples of texts on political theory and film drawn from figures such as Agamben, Badiou, Jameson, etc. Enrollment limited to 20. This class is for Graduates only. Upperclass undergraduates require instructor permission.

MCM 2120F - Concepts of Space and Time in Media Discourses (HMAN 2970C)
Interested students must register for HMAN 2970C S01.

MCM 2300 - Studies in Styles, Movements, and Genres
No description available.

MCM 2300A - Real TV
This course will investigate the construction of reality on U.S. television, considering not only specific reality genres (news and "magazine" programs, crisis coverage, docudrama, talk and game shows) but the discursive and representational modes that define the "reality" of commercial television as a whole. Issues include: "liveness"; social relevancy"; therapeutic discourse; TV personalities; media simulation; independent television; and new technologies/realisms.

MCM 2300B - Television, Gender and Sexuality
This course investigates how television produces and reproduces constructions of gender and sexuality through its institutional form (as it maps relations between the public and the private, the domestic and the social, the inside and the outside), narrative patterns (as it circulates family romances, links gender and genre, and mediates sexual and social tensions), and spectatorial relations (as it variously addresses viewers as sexed and gendered subjects, consumers and commodities, familial and defamiliarized viewers). Enrollment limited to 20. Preference given to graduate students, and then to seniors and juniors in Modern Culture & Media, Art- Semiotics, MCM-German, MCM-Italian, Semiotics French and Gender and Sexuality Studies. Instructors permission required for all undergraduate students. Interested students who cannot pre-register should come to the first day of class to fill out an application for admission.

MCM 2300C - After Postmodernism: New Fictional Modes (ENGL 2760X)
Interested students must register for ENGL 2760X S01.

MCM 2300D - Historicism/Photographic Media: From Kracauer and Benjamin to the DEFA Documentary (GRMN 2660H)
Interested students must register for GRMN 2660H S01.

MCM 2300E - Things Not Entirely Possessed: Romanticism and History (ENGL 2561B)
Interested students must register for ENGL 2561B S01 (CRN 16829).

MCM 2310 - Studies in Textual Formations
No description available.

MCM 2310C - Eisenstein and Political Modernism
Eisenstein's theories and films are a formative moment in cinema and media history, bringing together the ambitions of politicized film and modernist aesthetics. From the first, they were invoked by a range of radical theorists and filmmakers all the way from Brecht and Benjamin to Metz and Deleuze, as well as a variety of filmmaking practices such as militant documentary, third cinema and Godard. In this seminar, we will intensively study Eisenstein's theories, filmic practices and shifting historical contexts, from the heady days of the politically and aesthetically avant-garde 1920s, through the transformations of his theories in the 1930s and 1940s (many only available posthumously) and of his later film projects (several unfinished). We will also trace out some filiations and rereadings of Eisenstein within the history of politically conversant modernist film practices and theories. Permission required for undergraduates only; undergraduates seeking permission must attend the first class session.

MCM 2310D - The Idea of a Medium
What is a "medium" (a term we often seem to take for granted)? An examination of issues of medium specificity, intermediality, convergence, formalism and the idea of a "post-medium era," in relation to the media of print, photography, film, television, and digital media. We will also investigate the role of the museum and alternative screening or exhibition spaces as well as "virtual space" in delineating reception of the media. Enrollment limited to 20. Primarily for MCM graduate students; other qualified graduate students and MCM seniors must obtain permission after the first class. Students MUST register for the lecture section and the screening.

MCM 2310E - TV Space and Time
Explores television's temporal and spatial construction, considering how television demarcates time (regulating it through flow and segmentation, articulating work and leisure times, marking familial and national events, encouraging rhythms of reception) and space (mapping public and private space, defining a "global media culture" through local viewings, representing and enacting travel and exchange, creating imaginary geographies and communities). Enrollment limited to 20. Preferences given to graduate students. All others seek permission from the instructor. Students MUST register for the lecture section and the screening.

MCM 2310G - Cultural Studies and the Problem of Form
This course examines the emergence and contemporary practice of "cultural studies" with a focus on concepts of form. We will consider cultural studies critiques of disciplines, canons, and the aesthetic; the politics of form; theories of reading and spectatorship; "popular" and "mass" forms; and competing definitions of culture as form arising in fields from visual and media studies to postcoloniality and queer theory. Readings from Williams, Hall, Mulvey, Althusser, Spivak, Deleuze, Hartman, Agamben, Sedgwick, Galloway. Instructor permission required. All students seeking permission must attend first class.

MCM 2310H - Television Realities
How does television bring "real" events to us? How do we define or know what's "real"? What kinds of "realities" exist on television, and how do they operate (in relationship to one another, to TV fantasy, to social structures, and to our everyday lives)? This course will consider not only some specific "reality genres" (news, catastrophe coverage, "live" and "historical" programs, "surveillance programming," documentary and docudrama, talk and game shows, reality series and "docu-soaps") but the representational modes that define the reality of commercial television as a whole. Enrollment limited to 20 graduate students. Permission required for undergraduates only.

MCM 2310I - At the Limits: Media Representation of the Holocaust
The Holocaust has been described as unimaginable, at the limits of representation. Yet there have been numerous attempts to imagine and represent it, across media (film, television, graphic novels), genres (documentary, melodrama, comedy, fantasy), and modalities (through history and memory, "high" and "low" culture, fiction and nonfiction, reporting and marketing). Considering such attempts to represent the unrepresentable and mediate the immediacy of trauma, this course will explore media texts and theoretical/philosophical reflections on the Holocaust. Enrollment limited to 20. This course is for Graduates only. Upperclass undergraduates require instructor's permission.

MCM 2330 - Critical Genres
Introduces graduate students to specific aspects of the history, methods, and arguments of the academic interdiscipline known as "cultural studies." In a workshop forum, we discuss the conventions governing academic genres and consider the evidence, argumentation, rhetoric, and the construction of expertise.

MCM 2500 - Studies in the History of Media
No description available.

MCM 2500A - Film and Modernity
An examination of films and film movements from 1895 through the 1930s in relation to the rise of modernity, modernization, and modernism. We will analyze the films through the lenses of theories of technology, temporality, the avant-garde, and the emergence of mass culture. Readings in Gunning, Bergson, Simmel, Kracauer, Benjamin, Jameson, Hansen, and others.

MCM 2500C - Media Archaeology
Provides an intellectual history of "Media Archaeology," focusing on contributions by the "Sophienstraße" departments of Humboldt University in Berlin and on the importance of Marshall McLuhan and Michel Foucault, amongst others, to its development. Readings in Friedrich Kittler, Wolfgang Erst, Cornelia Vismann. Permission required for undergraduates only.

MCM 2500D - Archaeologies of the Projected Image
Analysis of the history and theory of projected images from the magic lantern to IMAX. We will examine theories of scale, architecture, and perspective in order to consider the changing size of moving images, from the flip book to the cinema screen to the cell phone. We will also consider theories of mass culture, aesthetic technologies, the sublime, and public art. Readings in Jonathan Crary, Siegfried Kracauer, Sigmund Freud, Walter Benjamin, Henri Lefebvre, Jean-François Lyotard, Friedrich Kittler, Laurent Mannoni, Erkki Huhtamo, and others. Enrollment limited to 20 graduate students. Permission required for undergraduates only.

MCM 2500E - Temporality in/and the Cinema
An examination of the cinema’s historical and theoretical position as a mode of representing time. Is time recorded or produced by film? How can we analyze duration in the cinema? What is the cinema’s relation to the archive and to modernity? We will read work by Bergson, Freud, Marey, Kracauer, Benjamin, Deleuze, and others. Films by Lumière, Griffith, Snow, Tsai Ming-Liang, Hitchcock, and others. Enrollment limited to 20. This course is for Graduates only. Upperclass undergraduates require instructor's permission.

MCM 2510 - Studies in Nationality and Transnationality
No description available.

MCM 2510A - Art Cinema as Transnational Textual Strategy
In the 1960s, Antonioni, Bergman, Buñuel, Fassbinder, Fellini, Godard, Resnais, etc. achieved international,global, prominence by bending mainstream narrative cinema conventions in the name of original national and artistic subjectivities. But such "art cinema" has pervaded film history, from the 1920s (e.g. German Expressionism) to the present (e.g. New Iranian Cinema). Investigation of art cinema's textual strategies, conceptual underpinnings, and historical functions.

MCM 2510B - Cinema, State and Global Violence
Theoretical and political conceptions of state and global violence posed against the history of cinema, as representational apparatus and as institution. Special attention to the establishment of film as a global medium through World War I, and current work around "globalization," "postmodern media culture," etc. Readings from sociopolitical theorists (e.g. Weber, Arendt, Angabem, Hardt and Negri, Foucault) and cinema/media scholars (e.g. Virillio, Prince, L. Williams, Miller.

MCM 2510C - The Adventures of Dignity
What is the ideological function of "dignity" as it is invoked in human rights discourses? What concepts of humankind and what fantasies of wholeness are assumed and reiterated? Readings include histories of human rights, treatises on dignity from Kant to Foucault, Elaine Scarry, and other theorists. Enrollment limited to 20. This course is for Graduates only. Upperclass undergraduates require instructor's permission.

MCM 2800 - Special Topics in Modern Culture and Media
No description available.

MCM 2980 - Independent Reading and Research in Modern Culture and Media
Individual reading and research for doctoral candidates. Not open to undergraduates. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.

MCM 2990 - Thesis Preparation
No description available.