Reverse Ecology:
Computational Integration of Genomes, Organisms, and Environments

IGERT Events







Events

  • EEB Tuesday Seminar Series Download EEB Tuesday Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    September 16, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Professor Andrew Spence Department of Bioengineering Temple University Talk Title: Gait, posture, pogo-sticks and newfangled neurogenetics: how do legged animals control their locomotion? Biomed Center, Room 291 (Eddy Auditorium) Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Dept: EEB, Seminars
  • MCB Graduate Program Seminar Download MCB Graduate Program Seminar to my desktop calendar

    September 17, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Dr. David Brautigan, University of Virginia, will present a seminar. Title: "Multiple Functions of Protein Ser/Thr Phosphatase-6 in Cell Signaling" Sidney Frank Hall, Room 220 (Nathan Marcuvitz Auditorium) NSGP (Neuroscience Graduate Program), Open to the Public, Graduate School, Audience, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, MCB Graduate Program, Dept: MCB, MMI, BioMed: Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, Dept: MPPB, Dept: EEB, BioMed: PathoGrad, BioMed: Pathology, Departments, Seminars
  • D.E. Shaw Research Event Download D.E. Shaw Research Event to my desktop calendar

    September 17, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM D. E. Shaw Research is an independent research laboratory that conducts basic scientific research in the field of computational biochemistry under the direct scientific leadership of Dr. David E. Shaw. Our group is currently focusing on molecular simulations involving proteins and other biological macromolecules of potential interest from both a scientific and a pharmaceutical perspective. Members of the lab include computational chemists and biologists, computer scientists and applied mathematicians, and computer architects and engineers, all working collaboratively within a tightly coupled interdisciplinary research environment. Our lab has designed and constructed multiple generations of a massively parallel supercomputer called Anton specifically for the execution of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Each Anton computer can simulate a single MD trajectory as much as a millisecond or so in duration -- a timescale at which biologically significant phenomena occur. Anton has already generated the world’s longest MD trajectory. Join us for an overview of our work on parallel algorithms and machine architectures for high-speed MD simulations and a description of the simulations that have helped elucidate the dynamics and functional mechanisms of biologically important proteins. brown.edu/ccmb Watson CIT - SWIG Boardroom (CIT241) Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, CCMB, Departments, Seminars
  • Brown Statistics Seminar - Meta-Analysis by Confidence Distribution – A Unified Approach and Beyond Download Brown Statistics Seminar - Meta-Analysis by Confidence Distribution – A Unified Approach and Beyond to my desktop calendar

    September 22, 2014 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM Brown Statistics seminar Series Min-ge Xie, PhD Professor of Statistics Director, Office of Statistical Consulting Department of Statistics and Biostatistics Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey "Meta-Analysis by Confidence Distribution – A Unified Approach and Beyond" Meta-analysis is a powerful tool for synthesizing evidence from multiple studies for common hypotheses or parameters of interest. The use of meta-analysis methods has grown substantially in recent years, and new methodologies are being developed to counter ever-growing more complicated problems such as heterogeneity, network meta-analysis problems, among others. In the talk, we will first provide a review of several new meta-analysis methods developed recently using confidence distributions (CDs), which also includes a brief introduction of the CD concept and a CD-based unifying meta-analysis computing algorithm called “gmeta”. We will then present a concrete yet general multivariate meta-analysis approach for heterogeneous studies by using CDs. This approach only requires summary statistics of each study nevertheless it is shown to be asymptotically as efficient as the maximum likelihood approach using individual participant data (IPD) from all studies. Robustness issue is also explored. The method is illustrated by data simulated from a randomized clinical trials setting as well as by real data on aircraft landing performance. http://www.stat.brown.edu/Seminars.aspx 121 South Main, Room 245 Open to the Public, Audience, Dept: Applied Mathematics, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, PH-biostatistics, Departments, Seminars
  • EEB Tuesday Seminar Series Download EEB Tuesday Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    September 23, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Asst.Professor Michael Desai Harvard University Talk Title: Adaptation and Epistasis in Experimental Budding Yeast Populations Biomed Center, Room 291 (Eddy Auditorium) Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Dept: EEB, Seminars
  • MCB Graduate Program Seminar Download MCB Graduate Program Seminar to my desktop calendar

    September 24, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Dr. Alla Grishok, Columbia University, will present a seminar: "Insights into gene regulation by RNAi chromatin and Forkhead transcription factors" Host: Will Fairbrother Sidney Frank Hall, Room 220 (Nathan Marcuvitz Auditorium) MRI Research Facility, NSGP (Neuroscience Graduate Program), Open to the Public, Graduate School, Audience, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, MCB Graduate Program, Dept: MCB, MMI, BioMed: Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, Dept: MPPB, Dept: EEB, BioMed: PathoGrad, BioMed: Pathology, Departments, Seminars
  • Dr. Josh Stuart - UC Santa Cruz - CCMB Seminar Download Dr. Josh Stuart - UC Santa Cruz - CCMB Seminar to my desktop calendar

    September 24, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Dr. Josh Stuart - Professor, Biomolecular Engineering University of Santa Cruz, CA Wednesday, September 24th, 2014 4:00 p m - Swig Boardroom (CIT 241) Title & Abstract TBA brown.edu/ccmb Watson CIT - SWIG Boardroom (CIT241) Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, CCMB, Departments, Seminars
  • MCB Data Club Download MCB Data Club to my desktop calendar

    September 26, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM The MCB Data Club will be held at 4 PM in Sidney Frank Hall, room 220. Presenters: Judson Belmont (Salomon Lab and Allison Taggart (Fairbrother Lab) Sidney Frank Hall, Room 220 (Nathan Marcuvitz Auditorium) NSGP (Neuroscience Graduate Program), Open to the Public, Graduate School, Audience, Biology and Medicine, MCB Graduate Program, Data Club, Dept: MCB, MMI, BioMed: Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, Dept: MPPB, Dept: EEB, BioMed: PathoGrad, BioMed: Pathology, Departments
  • Brown Statistics "Starr Lecture": Title to be announced Download Brown Statistics "Starr Lecture":  Title to be announced to my desktop calendar

    September 29, 2014 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM Brown Statistics Seminar Series Dimitris Bertsimas, PhD Boeing Leaders for Global Operations Professor of Management Professor of Operations Research Sloan School of Management Massachusetts Institute of Technology Abstract: To Be Posted http://www.stat.brown.edu/Seminars.aspx 121 South Main, Room 245 Open to the Public, Audience, Dept: Applied Mathematics, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, PH-biostatistics, Departments, Lectures, Seminars
  • EEB Tuesday Seminar Series Download EEB Tuesday Seminar Series to my desktop calendar

    September 30, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Cassie Stoddard Junior Fellow, Harvard University Talk Title: Visual communication in the avian world: the evolution of color, cuckoldry and camouflage Biomed Center, Room 291 (Eddy Auditorium) Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, Global Health Initiative, MMI, Dept: EEB, Seminars
  • Pattern Theory Seminar - William Bialek (Princeton) Download Pattern Theory Seminar - William Bialek (Princeton) to my desktop calendar

    October 1, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Division of Applied Mathematics, Pattern Theory Seminar William Bialek Professor, Department of Physics, Princeton University Statistical mechanics for real biological networks It is an old dream that ideas from statistical physics could help us understand the phenomena that emerge from biological networks, be they networks of genes, networks of neurons, or networks of organisms. In recent years, it has become possible to make increasingly accurate, simultaneous measurements on the states of (almost) all the nodes in such networks. I'll discuss the efforts that my colleagues and I are making to connect these data to statistical physics models. The key idea is the (quite old) maximum entropy principle: we try to build models that are consistent with some measured properties of the network (e.g., the correlations among the states of pairs of elements) but otherwise have as little structure as possible. I will use the example of a flock of birds to explain how this works, and to explain our surprise that it works so well. Statistical mechanics teaches us that, as systems become large, the parameter space breaks up into phases, and this also is true for families of maximum entropy models. Thus, we can ask where real networks are in the phase diagram of possible networks. For the flock, we'll see that the system is poised very close to a critical surface. We can go though a similar (but much more complex) analysis for a network of neurons in the vertebrate retina, and surprisingly we find the same answer — the system seems to be close to criticality, and we can detect hints of criticality in other systems as well. It seems that we are either seeing signs of something general, or we are fooling ourselves, and I'll outline a path to telling the difference. http://www.dam.brown.edu/ptg/seminar.html George Street 182, Room 110 (Applied Mathematics) Dept: Applied Mathematics, Brain Science Program, Biology and Medicine, Departments
  • MCB Graduate Program Seminar Download MCB Graduate Program Seminar to my desktop calendar

    October 1, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Dr. Joseph Ziegelbauer, National Cancer Institute, will present a seminar. Title: TBA Host: Amanda Jamieson Sidney Frank Hall, Room 220 (Nathan Marcuvitz Auditorium) NSGP (Neuroscience Graduate Program), Open to the Public, Graduate School, Audience, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, MCB Graduate Program, Dept: MCB, MMI, BioMed: Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, Dept: MPPB, Dept: EEB, BioMed: PathoGrad, BioMed: Pathology, Departments, Seminars
  • Brown Statistics Seminar - "Causality and Statistical Learning" Download Brown Statistics Seminar - "Causality and Statistical Learning" to my desktop calendar

    October 1, 2014 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM Brown Statistics Seminar Series Andrew Gelman, PhD Professor, Department of Statistics Professor, Department of Political Science Columbia University "Causality and Statistical Learning" Causal inference is central to the social and biomedical sciences. There are unresolved debates about the meaning of causality and the methods that should be used to measure it. As a statistician, I am trained to say that randomized experiments are a gold standard, yet I have spent almost all my applied career analyzing observational data. In this talk we shall consider various approaches to causal reasoning from the perspective of an applied statistician who recognizes the importance of causal identification, yet must learn from available information. http://www.stat.brown.edu/Seminars.aspx 121 South Main, Room 245 Open to the Public, Audience, Dept: Applied Mathematics, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, PH-biostatistics, Departments, Seminars
  • Brown Statistics "Starr Lecture": “Redesign of Care for Patients at High Risk of Hospitalization in a Reforming U.S. Healthcare System: Rationale for a CMMI Innovation Challenge Project” Download Brown Statistics "Starr Lecture": “Redesign of Care for Patients at High Risk of Hospitalization in a Reforming U.S. Healthcare System: Rationale for a CMMI Innovation Challenge Project” to my desktop calendar

    October 6, 2014 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM Brown Statistics Starr Lectureship Series David Meltzer, PhD Associate Professor of Medicine Chief, Section of Hospital Medicine Associate Professor of Economics and Public Policy The University of Chicago “Redesign of Care for Patients at High Risk of Hospitalization in a Reforming U.S. Healthcare System: Rationale for a CMMI Innovation Challenge Project” The growing use of hospitalists has accelerated the development and implementation of new strategies to improve hospital care. However, the use of hospitalists has also been accompanied by a decline in the engagement of primary care physicians in the inpatient setting, whose preexisting relationship with the patient may improve care both during and after the hospitalization, especially for complex patients This talk will review the rationale and design of a CMS-funded study to examine whether receiving inpatient and outpatient care from the same physician can improve costs and outcomes for patients at high risk of hospitalization. http://www.stat.brown.edu/Seminars.aspx 121 South Main, Room 245 Open to the Public, Audience, Dept: Applied Mathematics, Biology and Medicine, Lectures, Conferences, and Meetings, PH-biostatistics, Departments, Lectures, Seminars