Courses

Courses

Fall 2014

Histology (BIOL 1890)

Instructor: Professor Marjorie Thompson
Course Location/Time:  Pfizer Campus, Wednesdays from 3:00 to 6:00.  Classes start September 3, 2014

Course Description:   This course will provide an in-depth treatment of the "stuff we are made of" and the wonderful logic of its organization.  The basic architecture of the body is of primary significance in gaining an understanding of what we as human animals are made of and how we work.  Fundamental to such an understanding is the basic unit of life, the cell.  During early development, cells in the aggregate undergo specialization as tissues which are the building blocks of the body.  This course focuses first on the biology of the four basic tissues (epithelium, connective tissue, muscle, and nerve) and second, how they contribute to the functional anatomy of all organs and systems.  We will emphasize characteristic developmental, structure-function and regulatory relationships - many of which are the foundation for the understanding of pathologic alteration.

Syllabus

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Spring 2014

Biology of the Eukaryotic Cell (BIOL 2050)

Instructors: Professors Michael Foulk and Susan Gerbi
Course Location/Time: TBD

Course Description: This advanced course examines the organelles and macromolecular complexes of eukaryotic cells with respect to structural and functional roles in major cellular activities. It emphasizes the experimental basis for knowledge in modern cell biology using original literature, and discusses the validity of current concepts of cell structure and function.

Syllabus

 


Fall 2013

Virology, BIOL 1560

Instructors: Professor Peter Shank
Course Location: Pfizer, Inc. (Groton, CT Main Campus)
This class will meet Wednesdays 3:00-6:00pm.

Course Description: The emphasis of this course will be on understanding the molecular mechanisms of viral pathogenesis. It will begin with a general introduction to the field of virology and then focus on the biology of specific viruses that are associated with human disease. Lectures will be based on the current literature.

Syllabus


Spring 2013

Introduction to Epidemiologic Research Methods, PHP 2120

Instructors: Professors Elizabeth Triche and David Dore
Course Location: Pfizer, Inc (on-site)
This class will meet Wednesdays 3:00-6:00pm.

Course Description: The overall objective of this course is to provide students with an introduction to epidemiologic research methods, with a focus on select topics in pharmacoepidemiology. We will discuss epidemiologic concepts in the context of drug studies that have led to increased public awareness and/or confusion (e.g., Vioxx, SSRI, aspirin, etc.). A common theme of the pharmacoepidemiology lectures will be the practice of epidemiology in highly regulated environments.

Syllabus


Fall 2012

Advanced Biochemistry

Instructor: Professor Gerwald Jogl
Course Location: Pfizer, Inc (on-site)
This class will meet Thursdays 4-6:30pm.

Course Description: An advanced course in biochemistry, biochemical methods, and reading of the primary literature, featuring systematic coverage of the biochemistry of the central dogma, including DNA (replication, repair, recombination), RNA (regulation and mechanism of transcription, processing, turnover), and proteins structure, synthesis, modification, degradation, mechanisms of action, function).

The overall goal of this course is to study how essential concepts of biochemistry are applied in current biomedical research. We will review core topics of biochemistry and read one or two recent research articles relevant to these topics. The in-class discussion will (a) examine the experimental approach, (b) how the results of each report fit with prior knowledge, and (c) how these findings moved the field forward.

Core Curriculum Requirement: Yes

Syllabus


Spring 2012

Drug and Gene Delivery, BIOL 2110

Instructor: Beth Zielinski, Ph.D.
This class will meet Wednesdays from 4-6:20pm beginning February 1, 2012.
Course Location: Pfizer, Inc. (on-site)

Course Description:
Pharmaceuticals have traditionally been administered to patients via oral routes that rely on ingestion of tablets, appropriate degradation absorption in the gastrointestinal tract and transport to target tissues. Many drugs are chemically unstable and are significantly degraded during the digestion and absorption processes. Furthermore, once in the circulatory system, these drugs do not necessarily reach their intended physiological sites and are distributed throughout the entire body. Advances in the formulations of chemical and protein-based therapeutic molecules and site-specific delivery systems have allowed for the development of targeted drug and protein therapies. The immergence of advanced delivery technologies for drugs and most recently genes, for gene therapy, has catapulted site-specific drug, protein and gene therapies into the forefront of pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical research, process development and manufacturing.

Drug and Gene Delivery will address the historical perspectives and the science and technologies that form the basis of drug, protein and gene delivery systems. Presentations and interpretations of these advances in the lay press will also be reviewed and discussed. The therapeutic systems will be presented in the context of specific organ systems and associated pathophysiologies. Topics for discussion will include drug and gene therapies for cardiovascular disease, hormone therapies, bone and cartilage related therapies and genetically-based vaccines. The immerging areas of in utero and embryonic gene therapies will also be discussed.

Core Curriculum Requirement: No

Syllabus


Fall 2011

Environmental Health and Disease, BIOL 1820 (CRN 17329)

Instructor: Michelle Embree Ku
This class will meet Tuesdays from 3:30 - 6:30pm., beginning September 6th.
Course Location: TBD

Course Description:
Humans have a long history of trying to understand and control how the environment affects their physiology. From the ancient Romans’ appreciation of sewers and aqueducts to current interest in nanoparticles’ influence on human health, there has been the desire to manage our environment to better our health. Today, the issues surrounding environmental health are complex and understanding them involves a multidisciplinary approach, using principles from toxicology, pathology, epidemiology and risk assessment, to name a few. Additionally, ethical, legal, and social issues must be considered. Environmental Health and Disease (BIOL 1820) will introduce students to the fundamental science that helps to guide public policy and individual decisions about human exposure to environmental insults, whether the insult is natural or manufactured.

Topics covered will include:
Environmental Toxicology: how the body reacts to environmental insults
Environmental Epidemiology
Sources of exposure: physical, chemical, and biological agents
Risk management, ethical considerations and policy making
Risk communication and the media
Emerging issues in Environmental Health and Disease

Core Curriculum Requirement: No

Syllabus


Summer 2011

The Immune System, BIOL 2640C (CRN is 60464)

Instructors; Richard Bungiro, Ph.D.
This class will meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 - 6:45 at the Pfizer Groton campus, 118 auditorium, beginning May 17th, 2011

Course Goals:
Introduction to the experimental and theoretical foundations of immunology and the function of the mammalian immune system. Focuses on concepts, landmark experiments and recent advances. Topics include innate and adaptive immunity; structure/function of antibody molecules and T cell receptors; and regulation of immune responses through cellular interactions. Application of concepts to medically significant issues (vaccines, transplantation, hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, cancer, immunodeficiency) is discussed. Interpretative analysis of experimental data is emphasized. Activities include written assignments that analyze a hypothetical immune system and a final paper addressing an immunological topic of the student's choosing.

Core Curriculum Requirement: No

Syllabus


Spring 2011

Molecular Genetics, BIOL 2540 S02 (CRN 26001)

Instructors; Mark Johnson, Ph.D.
This class will meet Wednesdays, 3:30-6:30 PM on the Pfizer campus.

Course Goals:
‘Molecular Genetics’ represents a set of techniques used by biologists to understand how cells and organisms work. Students will read and discuss examples of how this set of tools has been applied to make fundamental contributions to our understanding of biological function.

Core Curriculum Requirement: Yes

Syllabus


Fall 2010

Cells and Circuits of the Nervous System, NEUR 1500

Instructors; Diane Lipscombe, Ph.D. , Michael Paradiso, Ph.D. , David Sheinberg, Ph.D.
This class will meet Wednesdays, 3:30-6:30 PM in the Pfizer Groton auditorium

Course Description:
This course will provide an overview of the mammalian nervous system with an emphasis on the structure and function of the human brain.

Students will acquire an understanding of brain structure and function ranging from molecular mechanisms to specialized circuits for particular facets of perception, action, and thought. Students will learn the basis of a wide variety of neurological disorders.

Core Curriculum Requirement: No

Syllabus


Spring 2010

Histology, BIOL 1890 S01

Instructor: Marjorie E. Thompson, Ph.D
This class will meet Tuesdays, 3:30-6:30 PM on the Pfizer campus beginning on January 26, 2010

Course Description:
This course will provide an in-depth treatment of the "stuff we are made of" and the wonderful logic of its organization. The basic architecture of the body is of primary significance in gaining an understanding of what we as human animals are made of, and how we work. Fundamental to such an understanding is the basic unit of life, the cell. During early development, cells in the aggregate undergo specialization as tissues, which are the building blocks of the body. This course focuses first on the biology of the four basic tissues (epithelium, connective tissue, muscle and nerve) and second, how they contribute to the functional anatomy of all organs and systems. We will emphasize characteristic developmental, structure-function and regulatory relationships many of which are the foundation for the understanding of pathologic alteration.

Syllabus


Fall 2009

Physiological Pharmacology, BIOL 1260 S02

Instructors; Dr. Robert L. Patrick, Dr. John Marshall
This class will be held Wednesdays from 3:30-6:30 pm in the Groton building 118W auditorium

Course Description:
This course will examine the major organ systems of the human body from the standpoint of how pharmacology can help treat system disorders. Starting with basic principles describing how drugs can interact with tissue targets , we will examine how drugs can be administered, distributed, metabolized and excreted. The rationale for drug therapies will be presented for systems such as: cardiovascular (angina, arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, cholesterol control), central nervous system( Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, depression, schizophrenia, epilepsy, drug addiction), endocrine (diabetes, osteoporosis), GI (peptic ulcer) and pulmonary (asthma).
Chemotherapeutic agents used to treat cancer, viruses and bacteria will also be evaluated. Finally, the process of drug development from the preclinical stage to marketing, and frontiers in pharmacology will be discussed.

Core Curriculum Requirement: Yes

Syllabus


Summer 2009

Human Physiology,   BIOL 2117Z sec 01

Instructor; John Stein, Ph.D
This class will be held Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3-6:15 pm in the Groton building 118W auditorium

Course description:

 BIOL2117Z provides an introduction to basic human physiological concepts along with more advanced coverage of selected systems.  We will start with topics of diffusion, cell physiology and the basis of cell membrane potential and then cover the nervous, endocrine, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal systems.  We will focus on normal human physiology and at times incorporate discussions of exercise physiology, pathophysiology, and specific physiologic scenarios to build toward the goal of understanding complex integration of function between cells, tissues and organ systems.

Core Curriculum Requirement: No

Syllabus


Spring 2009

Both courses will begin in December in order to fall under the new 2008 Pfizer educational assistance policy.

Cell Biology, Biol 1060

Instructor: Peter Heywood, Ph.D.

The class will be held on Thursdays from 3-6pm in Groton Building 118W auditorium.

Course Description:

This course provides a detailed survey of modern eukaryotic cell biology. Topics include: the structure and function of membranes and membrane systems such as the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi; the production of extracellular material, exocytosis, and endocytosis; the cytoskeleton and molecular motors; nuclear structure, mitosis, and meiosis; mitochondria and respiration; chloroplasts and photosynthesis; organellar nucleic acids and non-Mendelian inheritance. Also, we will consider how cell and molecular biology can provide an understanding of some human diseases such as those caused by defects in lysosomes, mitochondria, and the cytoskeleton. Readings will be assigned from “Essential Cell Biology” by Alberts et al. (Garland Press, 2004), review articles and papers from the primary scientific literature. The course grade will be based on two 90 minute in-class exams (25% each), a 3 hour final exam (35%) and three 20-minute quizzes throughout the semester (5% each). Students should have a background in biology and knowledge of organic chemistry.

Core Curriculum Requirement: Yes

Syllabus

Cancer Biology, Biol 1290, Section 2

Instructor: Anatoly Zhitkovich, Ph.D.

The class will be held on Tuesdays from 3-6pm in Groton Building 118W auditorium.

Course Description:

BIO1290 is designed to provide a conceptual understanding of molecular events underlying development of human cancer. The main focus of the course will be on the genetic changes leading to the neoplastic transformation of cells. The course will cover several major areas of cancer biology such as cell cycle control, DNA damage, tumor microenvironment, chemotherapy and drug resistance.

The ability to understand malignant transformation of cells on the molecular level and to critically evaluate existing literature in the field are two major goals of this course. The lecture materials will provide an overview of each topic whereas discussions of original research articles will be used as a tool for developing critical thinking in the analysis of cancer-related research.

Core Curriculum Requirement: No

Syllabus


Fall 2008

Virology - 21712 - BIOL 1560 - S02

Instructor: Peter R. Shank, Ph.D.

The class will be held on Tuesdays from 3-6pm in Groton Building 118W auditorium.

Course Description:
The emphasis of this course will be on understanding the molecular mechanisms of viral pathogenesis. It will begin with a general introduction to the field of virology and then focus on the biology of specific viruses that are associated with human disease. Lectures will be based on the current literature.

Core Curriculum Requirement: No

Syllabus


Summer 2008

Pharmaceutics Delivery in Biological Systems - BIOL 2930Z

Instructor: Beth Zielinski, Ph.D.

Course Description:
Pharmaceuticals have traditionally been administered to patients via oral routes that rely on ingestion of tablets, appropriate degradation absorption in the gastrointestinal tract and transport to target tissues. Many drugs are chemically unstable and are significantly degraded during the digestion and absorption processes. Furthermore, once in the circulatory system, these drugs do not necessarily reach their intended physiological sites and are distributed throughout the entire body. Advances in the formulations of chemical and protein-based therapeutic molecules and site-specific delivery systems have allowed for the development of targeted drug and protein therapies. The immergence of advanced delivery technologies for drugs and most recently genes, for gene therapy, has catapulted site-specific drug, protein and gene therapies into the forefront of pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical research, process development and manufacturing.

Drug and Gene Delivery will address the historical perspectives and the science and technologies that form the basis of drug, protein and gene delivery systems. Presentations and interpretations of these advances in the lay press will also be reviewed and discussed. The therapeutic systems will be presented in the context of specific organ systems and associated pathophysiologies. Topics for discussion will include drug and gene therapies for cardiovascular disease, hormone therapies, bone and cartilage related therapies and genetically-based vaccines. The immerging areas of in utero and embryonic gene therapies will also be discussed.

This course meets at Pfizer, Inc. (on-site in Groton, CT)

Core Curriculum Requirement: No

Syllabus