Sheridan Award Citations

Citations for Sheridan Award winners from 1999 through the present are available below.  A list of all Sheridan Award recipients since 1997 is also available.

2013

Professor Michael A. Paradiso (Bio-Med Neuroscience)

The outstanding letters of nomination and support are testament to your commitment to teaching and research mentorship. Countless Neuroscience concentrators describe how they came to Brown intending to major in some other field, only to be seduced by the excellent teaching and fascinating issues raised in your course, Neuro 1. Students have commented on your highly interactive and inspirational teaching style. Your impact on teaching has extended beyond Neuro 1, through your co-authored textbook, Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain, the leading undergraduate textbook in the field, which has been translated into Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese and Spanish.

You have also been a consummate mentor of undergraduates, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, many of who have gone on to illustrative careers. Your colleagues have noted the attention you devote to each and every one of your undergraduate TAs, creating an enriching environment for them. One of your former students writes, “I can confidently say that my extended relationship with Mike as both his student and mentee represents the core experience of my own formation as a teacher. As a university faculty member myself now for the past four years, whenever I reflect on my own teaching and mentoring, I invariably find myself confronted with, and drawing liberally from, the fine example that Mike set.”

Barbara Tannenbaum (Theatre Arts and Performance Studies)

You were enthusiastically nominated by your colleagues and students in recognition of your extensive mentorship in their development as successful practitioners of reflective teaching, and your leadership in cultivating professional development in communication throughout the academy.

Your contributions have extended far beyond Brown to museum curators, judges and justices at the highest level, and community organizations. Indeed, you have taught how to speak persuasively in the world at large. Yet, you are equally committed and generous during your office hours, where students have noted the beating heart of your mentoring and teaching process can be found. Former students note how your course, Persuasive Communication, has changed lives, and your classroom is a place of dynamic exchange where the growth and progress of even the most shy and introverted students is immediately discernible.

You have also served as an inspiration for your graduate students, frequently team-teaching with them and serving as a role model for their work with undergraduates. Many of these TAPS graduate students have become highly valued college teachers since leaving Brown, attributing much of their pedagogical success to the skills they learned under your careful tutelage. One of your students writes:

“[Barbara’s] capacity for in-depth, honest, face-to-face communication with her mentees is a rare and precious gift in a world of two-second emails and hurried exchanges in corridors. Over the course of a semester, Barbara watches you grow and she has the good grace and sharp intelligence to tell you what she sees in you. Indeed, she allows you to see things in yourself as a person in the world that you might not have seen before.”

2012

Professor Robert O. Self (History)

Your outstanding letters of support are testament to your unending commitment to your students and colleagues, and to the success of your department. Your students have repeatedly highlighted your impact on their academic experience at Brown. “This course,” wrote one student, “single-handedly changed the way I learn.”  Through your endeavors to change the way students learn, think about, and understand the world, you bring to your courses a passion for explaining why history matters, pushing and inspiring students to explore ideas and challenge assumptions. This commitment has extended beyond the classroom to the realm of history education nationally. Through your interactions with faculty members across various institutions, including community colleges and research universities, you’ve developed a keen understanding of the challenges facing undergraduate educators and you’ve worked tirelessly to place cutting-edge scholarship into the hands of those on the front-lines of history education across the nation. 

Your commitment to the future of the history professoriate is most notably evidenced by your leadership in transforming the graduate program in the History department. As graduate director, you worked tirelessly to scaffold, enhance, and strengthen the academic trajectory of graduate students. Your collegial mentorship and leadership has motivated and earned the respect of both faculty and graduate students. The intellectual rigor that underlies your research-informed teaching, together with your tireless efforts toward cultivating a graduate program of the highest caliber distinguishes you as an historian who embodies the integration of teaching, mentorship and scholarship. Indeed, your impact on the future history professoriate is far-reaching because of your stewardship of the graduate program, and your commitment to your students and to your discipline. This unending belief in your students, and passion for your field is amplified many times through these acts of empowerment.


Dr. Patricia Sobral (Portuguese & Brazilian Studies)

You are legendary amongst students for your genuine love for teaching and your transformational mentorship. Your innovative and cutting-edge pedagogy has contributed to the growth of Portuguese as a Foreign Language at Brown and to the evolution of your department’s faculty toward a more enlightened practice of reflective teaching in language, literature and culture. As such, your colleagues note that you have built the Portuguese-language acquisitions program to be one of the best if not the best in the country. And you have done so through a spirit of unending generosity by guiding new instructors and sharing not only your curriculum materials but your actual teaching practice, opening up your advanced language course to provide them with hands-on experience.  Your contributions to teaching extend far beyond your impact on students and colleagues. You’ve fostered change at the regional, national and international levels by integrating your scholarship and teaching to generate more meaningful awareness and knowledge of language and culture through your interactive model of Arts/Literacy teaching. 

Your mentorship is legendary – former graduate students have described your profound impact on their practice as reflective teachers through the ample opportunities you created for them to reflect in small groups, as you team-taught beside them in every class, breaking down hierarchies in the classroom between teacher and student to make students feel empowered in their learning. Graduate students collectively emphasize that you have guided each and every one of your TAs to shape their teaching not only at Brown but at the institutions they join after Brown.

Letters from your undergraduate students are testament to the transformative impact of your unending commitment to teaching and mentorship. One student says: “How would I describe Professor Sobral in one word alone? Charismatic... the word derives from the Greek word, charisma, which designates both a unique character trait, but also an act of offering something to someone expecting nothing in return. Her greatest offering to us? To hear us. To trust us from day one that each and every one of us is capable of... art.” Your generosity and your belief in your students are infused throughout each and every attribute, and it is no wonder that one of them declared “I intend to take classes with her until I graduate, no matter what she is teaching. With a great teacher, it doesn’t matter what the subject is.

Professor James Valles Jr. (Physics)

Your students and colleagues collectively voice the impact you have had on engaging the Physics department in dialogues centered on teaching and learning. You’ve encouraged sharing of best practices and new ideas from both senior and junior colleagues. Furthermore, your commitment to enhancing teaching and learning has extended beyond exploratory discussion – you have led by example, mentoring your colleagues and creating a welcoming learning environment for all of your students. Your wide-ranging experience in teaching courses from introductory level to the advanced graduate level has had a profound impact on countless generations of students.  Moreover, you’ve dedicated your efforts toward enhancing every aspect of the curriculum – colleagues have applauded your devotion to improving the laboratory courses as thoroughly as the other components of the departmental curriculum, supporting the partnership of faculty and graduate TAs as a crucial component to this success.

Your generosity is equally evident in your mentorship of junior colleagues. You’ve fostered research partnerships to further the careers of new assistant professors by engaging them in collaborations, and scaffolding their research mentorship skills. Numerous colleagues have expressed admiration and genuine enjoyment in co-leading graduate seminars with you – they have learned how to engage students in effective research discussions, and value the intellectual brainstorming and considered dialogues that you foster expertly and thoughtfully.

You’ve created an appreciation and understanding amongst your colleagues that effective teaching is essential for successful professionals, and developing these skills should be a part of the Ph.D. program. Indeed, you have integrated ways to enhance your research students’ communication skills in both formal and informal ways. Your own enthusiasm and willingness to engage students are cited as compelling reasons your students have been drawn to work in your research group.  Former graduate students emphasize that your mentorship has continued to help them in their careers beyond Brown, as your reflective approach to teaching and mentoring is embedded in everything you do. Through your guidance and genuine interest in your graduate students’ teaching, you’ve had enormous impact on their development as scholars. Indeed, a former graduate student reflects, “In my most recent mentoring experiences as a postdoc, I often find myself thinking about how Jim would interact with a student.  What would he ask that would provide an effective guide but also allow the student to discover?  How would he turn this criticism into a helpful lesson?  In sum, Jim’s thoughtful mentoring and excellent teaching are examples to everyone around him.”

2011

Arnold Weinstein (Comparative Literature)

You have been lauded as the epitome of the “university college” teacher-scholar. Your approaches in creating innovative dialogue and critical discourse by engaging students, colleagues and the broader community are legendary. We are inspired by your legacy of working with Harriet Sheridan herself to develop teaching collaborations that were groundbreaking at the time, which have had deep and widespread impact.  Prominent amongst these is Texts & Teachers, a series of interdisciplinary Great Books courses that introduced new critical perspectives including race, gender and ethnicity to the teaching of canonical works.  Through Texts and Teachers, you engaged faculty from across the disciplines of the Brown curriculum to collaborate in team-taught courses, and extended this teaching and learning community to regional high schools. School teachers were taught and mentored by Brown faculty and the students of these teachers attended classes at Brown. Your project became a national model that has since been adopted across the country.

Colleagues have described in countless ways how you are an inspired teacher who inspires students as readers in and outside of the classroom. As one eloquently said, “Chaucer comments of his character from the Canterbury Tales, ‘handy Nicolas’—‘gladly wolde he lerne and gladly teche.’  This is an apt characterization of Arnold, who is handy as well, ready to use what is ready at hand as well as handy at adapting and adopting the unfamiliar, a necessity for a comparatist.  But it is the ‘gladness’ at both learning and teaching that make it a pleasure to work with him.”

As legendary teacher and scholar, your passion and insights are pervasive throughout the academe- undergraduate and graduate students, junior and senior colleagues, and the world at large are drawn into your inspirational influence. Yet, for all of your larger than life qualities, notes a colleague, you retain a lightness of touch, insight tinctured by humor and the unexpected. Your mentorship is situated in a sincere, deep commitment to participatory democracy for all who enter your realm. As such, you embody the transcendence possible in education. In creating and nurturing a community of practice, you have indeed exemplified the spirit of the Harriet W. Sheridan Award.

Matthew Zimmt (Chemistry)
Your outstanding letters of nomination and support are testament to how deeply and extensively you have been, and continue to be, an inspiration to your students and colleagues.  Colleagues and former students have repeatedly highlighted your genuine love for teaching and your unending desire to help your students learn to learn. Indeed, your sustained commitment has continued to inform your practice as a reflective teacher- and your colleagues across the disciplines are familiar with your keen and scholarly approach to learning and teaching. You have been instrumental in transforming your departmental curriculum by leading through example, and by engaging in inclusive, exploratory discourse with junior and senior colleagues. 

The innovative changes you have introduced in the Chemistry department have significantly improved the instruction of the introductory organic chemistry courses at Brown.  By focusing students’ attention on problem-solving and small group learning, you’ve empowered students to explore foundational concepts while using face-to-face time to practice applying these principles. Years of listening to, and working with groups of students who sought your help outside of lectures, and personally responding to individual concerns and inquiries have provided you with the experiential insight that distinguishes you as a visionary leader who is unafraid of hard challenges, and a selfless and generous teacher.

Since your appointment as department Chair, you’ve continued to inspire and support your colleagues by encouraging best practice and through your own participation in continued professional development in teaching and learning.  Your deep commitment to supporting junior and senior faculty in exploring new pedagogical ideas and curricular innovations is appreciated across the institution, as is your leadership in fostering the successful transition of first year graduate students.  Indeed, it is clear from the attributes of both former undergraduates and graduate students that your tireless enthusiasm for chemistry and your belief in your students have been pivotal and lifelong influences in their academic careers.  In the words of a colleague, “long after students leave Brown to pursue their individual goals and get on with their lives, the one memorable faculty member they remember interacting with at Brown is Professor Matt Zimmt.”

2010

Nancy J. Jacobs (History)

Throughout your career at Brown, you have been a creative teacher and mentor for undergraduates, graduate students, and fellow professionals. You sought to create a sourcebook for modern African history in response to your students’ demands for more African “voices” in course readings. Rather than take it upon yourself to determine what should go into the book, you transformed it into a truly collaborative project in which undergraduates actively contributed toward the documentation and development of the sourcebook. In so doing, you not only embraced African “voices”, but you also gave voice to the scholarship of students.  Through your exemplary leadership and mentorship, you’ve embraced a philosophy of engaging all in deeply fulfilling and transformative experiential scholarship. Colleagues across the university have highlighted your leadership in the Watson International Scholars of the Environment program, through which you brought African professionals into extensive collaboration with Brown graduate and undergraduate students.  Your approach to teaching as scholarship was instrumental in creating an unparalleled learning experience for all, transcending national origins, professional qualifications, and academic degrees.

Your dedication and passion in creating collaborative communities of practice has been instrumental in fostering effective models for all.  Not only have you continually given thought to your own teaching, but you’ve had enormous impact on the History Department’s pedagogy as a whole.  Your department has praised your leadership in the development and enhancement of the History concentration, revitalization of concentration advising, and reorganization of the honors thesis program.  One of your former students remarked how you played a formative role in both her undergraduate and graduate education at Brown, emphasizing that she has never seen a professor integrate education, research and mentorship quite so seamlessly.  She enthuses, “Prof. Jacobs is the kind of rare educator who leaves an indelible mark on her students.  Rather than viewing teaching as secondary to her research, [she] sees them as inextricably intertwined… She has equipped countless students with the experience necessary to become reflective scholars and thoughtful global citizens.

Your heartfelt and outstanding letters of nomination and support are testament to how deeply and extensively you have been, and continue to be, an inspiration to students, colleagues and scholars locally and globally through the integration of scholarship, teaching and mentorship.

Robert A. Pelcovits (Physics)

Your colleagues have lauded your exemplary leadership and mentorship in your department and throughout the university.  Your contributions to teaching have had far-reaching impact amongst your colleagues and students; not only have you been an exceptional advisor and teacher, you have also been a role model for faculty engagement in developing a reflective teaching practice.  Your passion and commitment have been instrumental in creating a more open, inclusive and effective learning environment in the Physics department.  Your generosity towards the entire Brown community has been evident through your contributions to the Sheridan Center, presenting lectures in the Sheridan Teaching Seminar program, and serving as the departmental Sheridan Faculty Liaison for many years.  Your colleagues have praised your commitment to gender equity through your longstanding active involvement in leading initiatives to support the concerns of women in science and science teaching.  One of your former graduate students (now a professor of Physics) stated: “The Talmud once said, ‘when you teach your son, you teach your son’s son.’  These family values are passed down from generation to generation, and these principles which have been forever instilled in me were reflected in the teaching of Prof. Pelcovits. I often find myself asking how would he teach this class, or what words of advice would he offer to a student in need of help?  His office may no longer be down the hall from my own office today, but his teaching legacy is a central focus shining brightly on all those he has taught and inspired.” 

You are an exemplary role model for students and colleagues across the university. Your outstanding letters of nomination and support have highlighted your thoughtfulness together with your ethic of inquiry and mentorship in each and every one of your contributions to teaching and scholarship.

2009

Andrew G. Campbell (Bio-Med MMI)

You are recognized jointly by colleagues and graduate students across the division of Biology and Medicine for your imaginative leadership in developing a sustainable means to enhance the teaching of science in higher education.  Your collaboration has provided programs in professional development in pedagogy which mentor and nurture a diverse cohort of graduate students towards successful careers.  Your creation of skill development through training modules in "Responsible Conduct of Research for Biology and Medicine" and the innovative Senior Scholar Mentorship program have established a culture of collegial involvement in science education within the division.  The enriched educational opportunities you have created benefit underrepresented minority students and provide a model for intensive professional development training modules for all graduate students in the division.

Colleagues who have participated in the training modules noted that students benefited from mentoring from faculty in a variety of different teaching roles as well as skill development. These experiences encourage them to build reflective teaching practices for themselves and develop into well-rounded scientists. Your leadership has empowered senior graduate students to learn effectively and to mentor others through the agency of their own training modules.  One Senior Scholar noted that the training modules define "learning/education as a process that demands andthrives on creativity, collaboration, and active assessment and improvement."

Your efforts to ensure that graduate study at Brown in the life sciences prepares graduate students to become reflective teachers and mentors to succeeding generations of students will benefit our global community. 

Victoria P. Smith (Hispanic Studies)

Since your arrival at Brown in 1984, you have contributed to all aspects of undergraduate and graduate teaching and learning at Brown. You were nominated for the Sheridan Award by your colleagues and graduate students for your collaborative leadership in developing a professional development program in pedagogy for graduate students in Hispanic Studies. You have demonstrated inspiring openness to innovative pedagogical practices, most recently through the agency of the Contemplative Studies Initiative.  Your presentations at conferences and publications on professional development in pedagogy in peer-reviewed journals have had an impact across disciplines in the languages, including departments associated with the Center for Language Studies.  You have influenced a generation of graduate students to develop reflective teaching practices which have made Brown a leader in the preparation of the future professoriate.  

You are credited with writing a comprehensive guide for the department's Teaching Assistants who teach intensive language courses, for developing a complementary professional development program, and for introducing interactive technology into language instruction.  Your background in pedagogical theory enabled you to develop "theoretical bases for new methodologies."  Graduate students noted that your mentoring is distinguished by "respect for their individuality and cultural backgrounds" and is "an admirable example of managing the challenges of a demanding profession while maintaining balance and perspective."

Your faculty colleagues also lauded your gifts as a mentor.  One distinguished colleague stated "no one has taught me more ... about ...the very ethics of teaching and learning."  Another observed your "central role in articulating the goals and purposes of our concentration" during the recent revision of the department's curriculum.  In short, you exemplify the criteria for the Sheridan Award and have been an inspiration to colleagues across the University for over twenty-five years.

Nancy L. Thompson (Associate Dean, Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies, Division of Biology & Medicine)

You are recognized jointly by colleagues and graduate students across the division of Biology and Medicine for your imaginative leadership in developing a sustainable means to enhance the teaching of science in higher education.  Your collaboration has provided programs in professional development in pedagogy which mentor and nurture a diverse cohort of graduate students towards successful careers.  Your creation of skill development through training modules in "Responsible Conduct of Research for Biology and Medicine" and the innovative Senior Scholar Mentorship program have established a culture of collegial involvement in science education within the division.  The enriched educational opportunities you have created benefit underrepresented minority students and provide a model for intensive professional development training modules for all graduate students in the division.

Colleagues who have participated in the training modules noted that students benefited from mentoring from faculty in a variety of different teaching roles as well as skill development. These experiences encourage them to build reflective teaching practices for themselves and develop into well-rounded scientists. Your leadership has empowered senior graduate students to learn effectively and to mentor others through the agency of their own training modules.  One Senior Scholar noted that the training modules define "learning/education as a process that demands andthrives on creativity, collaboration, and active assessment and improvement."

Your efforts to ensure that graduate study at Brown in the life sciences prepares graduate students to become reflective teachers and mentors to succeeding generations of students will benefit our global community.

2008

Lynne Joyrich (Modern Culture and Media)

You were nominated for the Sheridan Award by colleagues from several departments across campus, as well as graduate students who have taught under your outstanding mentorship. They recognized that the impact of your support for the pedagogy of teaching far exceeds the expected requirements of University faculty. While your skills as a teacher are a model and an inspiration to your colleagues, you are noted for the way in which your pedagogy of teaching is explicitly integrated into all of your interdisciplinary activities, whether in the department or at the Pembroke Center. Colleagues and graduate students observe that you make transparent to others the pedagogy of your expert teaching and scholarship. As a result, you encourage them to recognize that the relationship between teaching and scholarship is crucial to the development of deeper understanding and substantive learning. Your professional development seminars in the department are seen as actively collaborative and valuable to all who attend. Colleagues are inspired by the considerable time you devote to mentoring graduate students in critical analysis of the craft of teaching.  Graduate students who have served as your teaching assistant eloquently describe how you explain the organization and educational goals of the syllabus; varied ways of discussing assignments; methods for evaluating student learning.  They are grateful that you follow up their lectures in your courses with comprehensive individual feedback. They note that you review the feedback they give on written assignments and work with them to ensure that their responses to students actually enhance learning. As one former teaching assistant stated, "The net result was an intensive encounter with every aspect of teaching ... [which] has prepared Professor's Joyrich's teaching assistants well for the early years of their career..." With this inscribed Sheridan Award Medal, the Advisory Board of the Sheridan Center celebrates your dedicated support of professional development in your department and across the University.

Diane Lipscombe (Bio-Med Neuroscience)

Your colleagues and both current and former graduate students across the University nominated you for the Sheridan Award in recognition of your extraordinary leadership in developing a program for graduate students in Neuroscience which provides for their professional development in pedagogy. You are cited for a redesign of the graduate curriculum to provide for the integrated development of scholarship and teaching in spite of a lack of grant-funded support for graduate student teaching.  Your patient diligence brought together graduate students and faculty colleagues from several departments to work collaboratively to develop a curriculum which expands traditional issues of pedagogy within and across fields to incorporate inclusive teaching.  After four years, the program has provided a firm foundation for a large group of fledgling faculty and inspired requests for the development of a program which will continue to give an international cohort of students the opportunity for professional development in teaching during their time at the NIH. In addition, your junior colleagues describe you as an inspiring model for the role of women in science as a result of the time and energy you have devoted to their development as faculty.  Graduate students and Post-doctoral Fellows note that your mentoring helps them to be active and critical participants in their own educational experience in the field through ongoing self-reflective assessment, as well as the mastery of content. With this inscribed Sheridan Award Medal, the Advisory Board of the Sheridan Center celebrates your dedicated support of professional development in your department and across the University.

2007

John J. Stein (Bio-Med Neuroscience)

Colleagues from across the University cited you for your outstanding reputation for leadership in the pedagogy of biology, whether in higher or elementary and secondary education. One colleague described you as "a tireless and inspiring mentor to a small army of graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants" during your twelve years at Brown. Your work in mentoring graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants in responsible pedagogy is founded on your own teaching style. Your ability to collaborate with colleagues in co-teaching complex courses models the fundamental collegiality of pedagogy which promotes learning. Your work with TAs at all levels inspires teamwork through the exchange of ideas and an understanding that sound pedagogy is based on ongoing reflection and revision. Your support for connecting the pedagogy of biology between higher education and local schools and community programs, benefits some 1,000 students each year through Brain Awareness Week. The prestigious NIH Science Education Partnership grant (A.R.I.S.E.), awarded to you and colleagues in Education and Summer & Continuing Studies, will advance local science education. Your ability to bring together colleagues within and across disciplines promotes interdisciplinary pedagogy and helps students understand intellectual connections, rather than mere disciplinary distinctions. In sum, you exemplify mentoring which empowers other to teach complex scientific concepts effectively and imaginatively to a broad spectrum of students. With this inscribed Sheridan Award Medal, the Advisory Board of the Sheridan Center celebrates your dedicated support of professional development in your department and across the University.

Meiquing Zhang (East Asian Studies)

Your colleagues in East Asian Studies have nominated you in recognition of your skills as a mentor of faculty colleagues in pedagogy within the discipline of Chinese language, for your support for pedagogical innovation amongst the members of your department, and for your scholarship in pedagogy within your field. Since 1988 your success in training others to be effective instructors of Chinese has resulted in the international reputation of the Brown program. You model the need for constant adaptation to ever-changing pedagogy in your field, whether in the incorporation of new discoveries in cognitive and linguistic sciences or the application of electronic technologies to empower student learning. Your research into pedagogy has led to the recent publication of an innovative approach to teaching first year Chinese, a new book on teaching grammar, and a book on teaching advanced Chinese. No less important is the vital work you have done in managing the entire educational experience of the study abroad program in China. Your ability to simultaneously manage complex and effective learning environments for students in different parts of the world was cited for ensuring that a Brown education in Chinese will have positive results long after graduation. With this inscribed Sheridan Award Medal, the Advisory Board of the Sheridan Center celebrates your dedicated support of professional development in your department and across the University.

2006

Kate Lynn Lapane (Bio-Med Community Health)

Your colleagues in the department of Bio-Med Community Health have nominated you for this award in recognition of tireless advocacy of “meaningful graduate education” in Community Health. Your leadership in establishing programs, such as a Journal Club and a Faculty Forum, to realize this goal has created a culture of exchange about professional development within the department. You have taken especial care to train the graduate students to solicit and use feedback to improve their teaching and presentation skills. The Faculty Forum enables graduate students to discuss career paths with faculty from diverse professional experiences. In order to support a revision of the department's graduate curriculum, you have designed professional development opportunities for faculty to ensure that the students achieve its goals. As a result, you have brought both on-campus and adjunct/voluntary faculty together to provide Brown graduate students in Community Health with a new doctoral program in Health Services Research.

You are especially noted for your superb work as a mentor not only to fledgling members of the field: graduate students, young research faculty, post-doctoral fellows in medicine and visiting scholars, but to your senior colleagues as well. One distinguished teacher in the department noted that your generous support of colleagues with assistance and advice “would make Harriet Sheridan proud.”

With this Sheridan Award Medal, the Advisory Board of the Sheridan Center celebrates your dedicated support of professional development in your department and across the University.

Kathryn T. Spoehr (Cognitive & Linguistic Sciences)

Colleagues from across the University have nominated you for the Sheridan Award in recognition of your work as a mentor of graduate students and junior faculty on pedagogy and professional development within your discipline, for your initiative in working to bring other related fields together with your department to build a broad-based reflective teaching practice, and for your tireless leadership in fostering pedagogy in the research environment of higher education.

Junior colleagues have noted that you support their development as new members of the department and the University in a way that encourages them to achieve professional goals without fear of failure. You model for them the rewards of advising graduate and undergraduate students and the benefits of interdisciplinary teaching. Your leadership of the department's professional development workshop for graduate students meets the disparate needs of graduate students in both cognitive and linguistic sciences. Graduate students cited not only your commitment to their education, but your ability to work with them as colleagues. They feel that you have made “support of graduate student teaching a priority in the department.

Your commitment to the professional development of teaching on a University-wide level received accolades from colleagues across the campus. Your support was crucial for the transition of the Sheridan Center from a program to assist graduate students prepare for successful academic careers to a resource on all aspects of pedagogy for faculty as well. One colleague noted that in each position you have held in the University, from faculty member to Provost, you have always been “cognizant that the Sheridan Center was key to Brown's ability to provide ongoing professional development that integrates reflective teaching and research.”

The Advisory Board of the Sheridan Center celebrates your unceasing efforts to improve the quality of teaching and learning at Brown.

2005

Mari Jo Buhle (American Civilization; History)

Your colleagues in both History and American Civilization cited you for your skills as a mentor for the professional development of graduate students and junior faculty in both departments. In the path-breaking, interdisciplinary field of women's history your graduate students learned to integrate and develop both their teaching and research skills so that the field was accessible to non-experts. Your mentoring of junior faculty encouraged their development both as faculty and as active participants in the process of University governance.

You are especially noted for your meticulous attention to the pedagogical professional development of your graduate teaching assistants, providing them with detailed feedback on both their teaching and scholarship. Your sponsorship of a professional development seminar within the American Civilization department has benefited a generation of successful faculty across the nation.

During the many years you were chair of American Civilization, you mentored a cohort of junior colleagues through the tenure and promotion process and helped them understand the intricacies of University governance. You model your commitment to teaching, scholarship and service to the University for your junior colleagues.

With this Sheridan Award Medal, the Advisory Board of the Sheridan Center celebrates your dedicated support of professional development in your department and across the University.

Anne Fausto-Sterling (Bio-Med MCB)

Colleagues and former students in the departments of Bio-MCB, Pathobiology and Sociology nominated you this award for your powerful skills as a mentor of graduate students and junior faculty across disciplines; for your leadership in revising departmental standards on teaching; and for your ability to help colleagues rethink traditional ideas about science, which have transformed the study of science and gender. You have been involved in professional development which improves the communication of new ideas across disciplines by both faculty and students throughout your career.

Your research in biology led you to bring more women into the field, and to link research in biology to social and political contexts. You developed innovative pedagogical techniques which have helped over a generation of colleagues, graduate students and lay people alike to understand the benefits of interdisciplinary, collaborative, research and teaching. Among the results of your efforts was the creation of the interdisciplinary concentration in Science and Society in 2004, the advocacy of diversity within the faculty, and the modeling of the significance of service to the University.

With this Sheridan Award medal, the Advisory Board of the Sheridan Center celebrates your unceasing efforts to improve the quality of teaching and learning at Brown.

Leonard Tennenhouse (English; Comparative Literature; Modern Culture and Media)

Your extraordinary efforts to provide substantive professional development for graduate students was recognized by your colleagues and former students in the department of English. Your own interdisciplinary work in three departments inspires graduate students across the disciplines to consider innovative ways of integrating teaching and research which challenges traditional boundaries.

The seminar you developed to help graduate students prepare for and find employment in academia is cited for emphasizing performance as both teacher and scholar. The seminar enhances the perception of graduate students that they are an important part of the professional life of the department. This empowers them to more effectively present their research and teaching qualifications when interviewing at other institutions of higher education. Your involvement of junior faculty in the seminar has facilitated their professional development and provided a model of effective mentoring for them. As a result, the English department's professional development seminar serves as a model for other departments across the University.

With this Sheridan Award medal, the Advisory Board of the Sheridan Center recognizes your significant contribution to the quality of teaching and learning at Brown.

2004

Beth W. Bauer (Hispanic Studies)

The Sheridan Award recognizes faculty contribution to pedagogical professional development at Brown University . Your colleagues celebrated your superb classroom teaching, your well-recognized scholarship in the field, and your endeavors to strengthen teaching by graduate students and faculty colleagues across the University through the agency of the Center for Language Studies.

You have run the comprehensive Hispanic Studies Training Program for Teaching Assistants and Associates, which includes the development of guidelines for this constituency, an orientation practicum , a graduate course on language pedagogy theory and methodology and run the department's Writing Center . With graduate students and colleague Victoria Smith, you worked to revise some of the most challenging courses in the curriculum.

Under your leadership as Director, the Center for Language Studies (CLS) has developed a substantive program for Brown graduate students who need assistance with English as a second language (ESL). Your innovative program, Cultura , fosters real-time cultural exchange through electronic technology. Current and projected CLS projects will transform teaching in the languages across the University and beyond. You have brought people together from across the University and motivated them to develop and implement goals.

As one colleague eloquently wrote "Prof. Bauer meets and does honor to every tenet of the Sheridan Award." With this Sheridan Award medal, the Advisory Board of the Sheridan Center celebrates your unceasing efforts to constantly reflect upon and improve the quality of teaching and learning amongst your colleagues at Brown.

Lawrence K. Stanley (English)

The Sheridan Award recognizes faculty contribution to pedagogical professional development at Brown University . Your colleagues cited you for your skills as a mentor, for your collaborative leadership of departmental initiatives to support learning, and for your internationally recognized scholarly efforts to integrate research and teaching across the curriculum.

Graduate students in your course "Pedagogy and Composition Theory" recognized your ability to empower them to teach a composition course with confidence and success. As one colleague wrote, "Graduate students in English, who had always taken their eloquence for granted, learned from Larry's trenches what it felt like to move through challenging stages of reflective learning before they actually taught such a class." Many of these graduate students have gone on to become successful directors of writing programs in higher education across the country. Faculty in other departments have also drawn upon your expertise to the benefit of their graduate students.

The innovative Expository Writing Program, developed with colleague Elizabeth Taylor, has attracted nation-wide attention to Brown because it combines academic writing with writing for real-world professions. This program has become an integral part of the English department's educational mission at Brown. Colleagues cited the program's website as a "brilliant" resource for faculty world-wide. Your forthcoming book on the nature and practice of aesthetic reading and writing will inspire innovation and discussion across the profession and the disciplines.

With this Sheridan Award Medal, the Advisory Board of the Sheridan Center celebrates your dedicated support of professional development in your department and across the University.

2003

Nancy R. Dunbar (Theater, Speech & Dance; Associate Provost)

You were nominated by your colleagues in the department of Theatre, Speech and Dance in recognition of your extraordinary efforts in the cause of professional development across the University. For some twenty years your patient work in promoting effective communication across the disciplines has affected members of the Brown community from graduate students to endowed professors. As department chair, you helped colleagues review the departmental curriculum, its standards and criteria, and its teaching evaluations - critical elements in professional development which have a positive impact on educational outcomes. Through the Rhetoric Fellows program, you helped faculty and students use class presentations as a more effective learning experience and, simultaneously, trained a generation of undergraduate Rhetoric Fellows to help other students improve their ability to communicate their ideas. Your work with colleague Barbara Tannenbaum to offer a Faculty Seminar on communication skills and techniques and a seminar on seminar on Gender and Communication appealed to faculty across the disciplines. They are legendary amongst those lucky enough to attend. Your annual lecture on "Teaching as Persuasive Communication" attracts faculty and graduate students from across the campus and RISD. Your colleagues across the university use words like "selfless" and "extraordinarily effective" in describing your capacity to help colleagues define and communicate goals and objectives which support the educational mission of the University. The Advisory Board of the Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning celebrates your dedicated support of professional development in your department and across the University.

Lawrence F. Wakeford (Education)

Your colleagues and former students have nominated you for this award for your advancement of the teaching profession both at Brown and across the state of Rhode Island. As a result of your efforts, you have linked science education in the University with secondary schools. One colleague noted that "to very many of his students, he is exactly the model of the teacher they would wish to become." A student observed that "he models reflective teaching practice: he de-mystifies the thought process behind his teaching choices." Your work beyond your department on behalf of thoughtful professional development has helped secondary school teachers across the state of Rhode Island as well as benefited faculty and graduate students at Brown. Your work at the state level to develop standards for the preparation and performance of new teachers and diversity standards for the Teacher Education Program Approval Process models professional planning for sound educational outcomes. Your particular concern for assessment techniques which foster substantive, deep, learning have been communicated across the disciplines in many different ways, including through the College Curriculum Council and the Sheridan Center. The Advisory Board of the Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning honors you for your support of professional development within in your department, across the University community, and throughout secondary education in the state of Rhode Island.

2002

Martha Sharp Joukowsky (Anthropology; Old World Archaeology & Art)

Colleagues in the department of Anthropology nominated Prof. Joukowsky as the model of a distinguished, multi-disciplinary, scholar whose in teaching is predicated on student learning. She was cited for her work to encourage pedagogical excellence among graduate students in the department as the long-term Faculty Liaison to the Sheridan Center . She includes both graduate and undergraduate students on her annual summer expeditions to Petra and uses this opportunity to help graduate students see how to productively integrate undergraduate teaching with research year-round. Her obvious passion for her work as a scholar and a teacher is an inspiration to her departmental colleagues. One colleague noted that graduate students constantly remark upon her assistance in helping them think about their teaching. Another commented, “Martha Joukowsky is a devoted teacher who is as eager about improving her own pedagogical skills as she is in imparting them to others.”

Prof. Joukowsky was praised because “She epitomizes precisely those qualities that…Harriet Sheridan had in mind when she developed Brown's Center for Teaching and Learning.” Indeed, Prof. Joukowsky and her husband, former Chancellor Artemis A. W. Joukowsky worked closely with Dean Sheridan from the Center's inception as the Center for the Advancement of College Teaching to support graduate teaching assistants become reflective members of the future professoriate. Among their collaborative efforts was the groundbreaking videotape Effective Teaching for Dyslexic/All College Students , which has reached both national and international faculty audiences. Not least, Prof. Joukowsky has chaired the Center's Advisory Board since Dean Sheridan's death in 1992 and led the Center during its evolution into a full-fledged resource for Brown's faculty as well as its graduate students. The Sheridan Award honors her whole-hearted, long-term, commitment to the entire University teaching community.

Lundy Braun (Bio-Med Pathology & Laboratory Medicine; Environmental Studies; Africana Studies)

A well-recognized scholar in the field of papillomaviruses and cervical cancer, Prof. Braun was recognized by her colleagues for the many ways in which her fundamental teaching philosophy has influenced her junior and senior faculty colleagues, both within and beyond her department. She was cited for encouraging active learning in both lectures and case-based laboratory sessions. Colleagues noted the example she sets as a faculty member who worked to ensure that learning in her course was integrated into the departmental curriculum. A junior colleague from outside her department observed that her work across disciplines is a model for integrating teaching and research and praised her generous, collegial, insightful, mentoring beyond departmental confines. A graduate student commented that Prof. Braun helps students to constantly self-evaluate their performance as a teacher – the essential component in developing a reflective teaching practice. In sum, Prof. Braun fulfills each criteria of the Sheridan Award.

2001

Sheila Bonde (History of Art & Architecture)

Your colleagues in the department of History of Art and Architecture have recognized you for your many efforts to mentor junior faculty colleagues, and to inspire the graduate students in the department to be good as teachers as well as good scholars. As a distinguished interdisciplinary scholar, you have demonstrated a commitment to finding thoughtful pedagogy and new media to promote learning by all students. Your creative approach to using electronic technology to integrate your research with your teaching will spread your influence far beyond the confines of Brown University. Your web site for the archaeological investigations at St. Jean des Vignes at Soissons, France has brought international cooperation and will benefit students of all ages around the world. We honor you for the inspiring example that you have set for your colleagues across the University.

James T. Mcilwain (Bio-Med Neuroscience)

Your colleagues in the department of Bio-Med Neuroscience have nominated you as the model of a renowned, multi-disciplinary, scholar whose in teaching is predicated on student learning. Your were cited for your unstinting willingness to mentor graduate students and junior faculty, and for your ability to communicate in a multiplicity of disciplinary languages, including Classics and Medieval Studies, as well as Neuroscience. You have demonstrated and reaffirmed the essential value of the liberal arts as a medium for intellectual growth. Your efforts to develop a departmental seminar for graduate students inspired many of them to take advantage of the Sheridan Center resources and to develop a reflective teaching practice. A significant number have gone on to become Sheridan Center Teaching Consultants and to help graduate student colleagues across the University reflect upon the efficacy of their own pedagogical goals and objectives. We honor you for the example of collegial support across disciplines that you have set for all members of the University.

Andries Van Dam (Computer Science)

Colleagues, both in and beyond your own department of Computer Science, have nominated you for this award in recognition of the example you have established as a pioneer in computer science education. Beginning with a course you developed in 1962, you set the standard for the field as it became an academic discipline. As a world-renowned scholar, your willingness to take precious time to mentor graduate students and junior faculty has set an example for your colleagues. Your development of a training course for your undergraduate teaching assistants is a model for faculty across the University to emulate. Your generous participation in Sheridan Center programs and publications, beginning with your work with Dean Sheridan, informs and inspires students and colleagues across the disciplines with your educational vision. The tangible results of this commitment to the educational value of electronic technology are seen each spring in the products developed by the students in CS 152 Educational Software. We honor you for your dedicated support of pedagogy as an integral part of scholarship.

2000

Jan A. Tullis (Geological Sciences)

You were nominated by your colleagues in the department of Geological Sciences in recognition of your outstanding success in integrating teaching and research as a fundamental goal of your discipline. As a distinguished scholar in your field, your willingness to take the time to mentor graduate TAs and junior faculty to take teaching seriously demonstrates this commitment and vision. Your tireless and long-standing work in developing and nurturing an annual departmental seminar on teaching for graduate students and your crucial role in supporting their interest in Sheridan Center resources is of especial note. The Advisory Board of the Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning honors you for your dedicated support of teaching in your department and for the inspiring example which you have set for your colleagues across the University.

Patricia Herlihy (History)

You were nominated by your colleagues, both faculty and graduate students, in the department of History in recognition of your success in demonstrating that both teaching and research are a fundamental goal of the discipline of History and in the interdisciplinary field of International Relations. As part of your work as an active scholar and departmental administrator, you have consistently devoted precious time to support fellow faculty members and to mentor graduate students. The committee was especially impressed by the appreciation of your colleagues for your quiet, but effective, mentoring of these fledgling historians. The Advisory Board of the Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning honors you for your support of teaching in your department and for the example which you have set for all members of the University community.

1999

George H. Borts (Economics)

The 2000 Sheridan award recognizes the many efforts you have made during a long and notable career at Brown on behalf of integrating teaching and research as a fundamental goal of your discipline. As a distinguished scholar, your willingness to take the time to mentor graduate teaching assistants and junior colleagues has inspired your department. They have applauded your patient and ongoing efforts to transform Economics 11 into a productive learning experience and have credited you with much of the success to date for this major undertaking. The Advisory Board of the Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning honors you for your long-standing support of teaching in your department and for the example which you have set for your colleagues.

Jonathan K. Waage (Bio-Med EEB)

The 2000 Sheridan Award recognizes the many efforts you have made on behalf of integrating teaching and research, both within your discipline and across the University. Your mentoring of graduate teaching assistants and junior colleagues is so exemplary that your department has cited you for it. In addition to being known for your innovative teaching in courses such as Bio 45 Animal Behavior: Ecological and Evolutionary Determinants, you have developed teaching methodologies which enhance the entire departmental curriculum. Your colleagues have noted your impressive contributions to the educational enterprise of the University, including your work as a long-standing member of the College Curriculum Council, as an active supporter of the WISE program, and as a Faculty Teaching Fellow of the Sheridan Center. The Advisory Board of the Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning honors you for your long-standing support of teaching in your department and for the inspiring example which you have set for your colleagues all across the University.

Thomas G. Goodwillie (Mathematics)

The 2000 Sheridan Award recognizes the profound impact your leadership in furthering departmental engagement with pedagogy has had on both faculty and graduate students in the department of Mathematics. As a distinguished scholar, your commitment to take the time to actively mentor graduate teaching assistants through a variety of activities has inspired your colleagues. In particular, you have been cited for your dedicated work in making the annual training program for Mathematics graduate teaching assistants "serious", and for leading a departmental seminar on teaching. You have been lauded for having "practiced what you preached" in the introductory Calculus course (MA 9). Furthermore, your colleagues recognize that your commitment to ongoing improvement in both teaching and research as resulted in the NSF-VIGRE award to the departments of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. The Advisory Board of the Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning honors you for your superb support of teaching in your department and for the example which you have set for your colleagues.