Annette M. Rodriguez

Education: Master of Arts in American Civilization, Brown University, 2011; Master of Arts in American Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, 2008; Bachelor of Arts in American Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, 2005

Research Interests: My research and dissertation reflect on the consolidation of national belonging through ritualized public violences. The object of my study—the lynching of Mexican/Mexican-Americans in the U.S.—explores the relationship between the long histories of U.S. militarism and expansion utilizing racialized violence to current anti-immigrant violence. My project foregrounds the uncertain and impossible boundary between México and the United States. Indeed, the U.S. socio-legal structures of citizenship, national identity, migration, racialized inequity, border militarization, and racial terror that were designed and perfected at the turn of the 20th century have been sustained and accelerated in the present.

Courses Taught:
Teaching Fellow (Spring 2011), Department of American Studies, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, AMCV0190: The Fringe is the Fabric: Anti-Immigrant Movements in the United States

Teaching Assistant, Department of American Civilization, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island ETHN1890E: Johnny, Are You Queer: Narratives of Race and Sexuality

Time Instructor, Department of Women Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico WMST 279.007: Feminist Theories and Methods in Action

Teaching Associate, Women Studies and the Research and Service Learning Program, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico WMST 200.001 Women's Social and Historical Perspectives

Teaching Assistant, Department of Women Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico WMST 400.001 Women in Global Migration

Selected Conference Presentations:
"Writing Borders on Bodies: How Violence Constructs the U.S.-Mexican Border at the Turn of the 19th Century," American Studies Association Annual Meeting, November, 2012
"Radical Imagination and the Jornada Tradition" American Comparative Literature Association, April, 2012
"Chicano Lynching's Erasure and Representation: Narrativizing a Useable Past," Newberry Library Seminar on Borderlands and Latino Studies, April, 2011
"Views From 'Outside': Resisting Universal Womanhood with Global and Local Feminisms of Lived Experience," National Women Studies Association Conference, Moderator and Panel Organizer, November, 2010
"The San Elizario Salt War: The 1877 Mexicano War against Environmental Exploitation," National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies, April, 2010
"From 'Lynching' to 'Hate Crime': Racialized Violence against Latinos," Law and Society Association Annual Meeting, May, 2009
"Developing Labor: Images of Women's Movement during the Bracero Program," Western Association of Women Historians Conference, Santa Clara University, May, 2009
"Mexican Lynching: The Invisible Spectacle," Histories of Violence Conference, George Mason University, October 2008
"Designed for Production: The Racialized Landscapes of the Copper Mines of Grant County, New Mexico," American Studies Association Annual Meeting, October 2007
"Indios Aqui y P'alla: Indigenous Narratives of Survivance during the Strategic Genocide of the Porfirio Diaz Regime," Rocky Mountain Interdisciplinary History Conference, University of Colorado at Boulder, September 2007
"Stories of Significance: Oral History Collection as Rural Community Preservation," National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies, April 2007
"Exploding the Tri-Cultural Identity of New Mexico: The Afro-Mestizo Presence in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680," The First and the Forced: African and Indian Intersections Conference, University of Kansas, November 2006
"El Fuego y la Palabra: Syncretic Religion and the Mexican Revolution," Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social National Conference, University of California at Berkeley, August 2005
"So Far From Chicago: Ana Castillo and Intracultural Representation," National Association of Chicana and Chicano Studies, April 2005

Selected Professional Experience:
Currently Review Co-Editor, H-Net Ethnic Book Review Section, H-Net Humanities & Social Sciences Online. Smithsonian Institute Fellow (2007), working with the American Museum's Bracero Exhibit and as the George I. Sanchez Fellow at the Center for Southwest Research (2006-2008), working with community oral histories and grassroots political archives. Selected as a National Graduate Fellow in the Law and Society Association (2009-2010) and a fellow in the Newberry Library Seminar on Borderlands and Latino Studies (2010-2011). Further augmenting scholarly efforts with continued work in local community service projects such as: the Blacks in the West Historical Project, the Institute for American Indian Research, the New Mexico Office of the State Historian, and the Southwestern Polytechnic Indian Institute, and the Julian Samora Legacy Project.

Awards and Honors:
Selected Participant, Futures of American Studies Institute, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, 2011
National Graduate Fellow, Law and Society Association, 2010
Latino Museum Studies Program Fellow, Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C., 2007
Gerald Davis Graduate Research Prize in American Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2007
National Pushcart Prize Nomination for Small Press Fiction, 2006-2007
George I. Sanchez Fellowship, Center for Southwest Research, as funded by the Center for Regional Studies, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2006-1008
National Emerging Writer Award Nomination, Taos Writers' Conference, Taos, New Mexico, 2006-2008
Hispanic Writer Award, Taos Writers' Conference, Taos, New Mexico, 2006