Courses for Fall 2014

  • Transnational Lives: Anthropology of Migration and Mobilities

    In an era characterized by globalization, by the increasing and rapid flows of ideologies, information, money, goods, and people across national borders, how do individuals, families, and communities grapple with the new forms of existence brought forth by migration? This course will go beyond macro-economic explanations of why migration happens to explore what migration does: the effects of mobility on a range of practices that include parenting, health, gender roles, marriage, politics, and anthropological research itself. We will consider three overlapping issues: the everyday practices of transnational living in a variety of cross-cultural settings; the theory and methodology anthropologists use to better understand local experiences of migration; and the ways in which migration has been effectively politicized. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS LILE WRIT
    ANTH 0066P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
  • An Archaeology of Native American Art

    This seminar is an introduction to the art and material culture of the indigenous peoples of North America. The regional coverage includes the continental United States and Canada, focusing on the peoples of Northeast, Midwest, Southwest, Plains, Pacific Northwest, and the Arctic and Subarctic. Topics addressed include art and artifact, function and symbol, innovation and tradition, and museums and representational practices, ethics and repatriation. Special attention will be given to the changing relations between museums and contemporary Native peoples. The seminar will make extensive use of the archaeological and ethnographic collections of the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology. FYS LILE
    ANTH 0066U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
  • Anthropology and Global Social Problems

    This course offers students an opportunity to examine and analyze a range of contemporary global social problems from an anthropological perspective. Course materials will focus on two major – often intersecting – sets of issues: inequality and development and health, humanitarianism and human rights. LILE
    ANTH 0110 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Culture and Human Behavior

    The goal is to challenge our beliefs about some taken for granted assumptions about human behavior and psyche by examining cultures with different conceptions of self and cognition. We will examine the issues of the role of nature and nurture in development, the nature of intelligence, coming of age, the association of psychological characteristics with gender and the naturalness of emotions. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chase
  • Culture and Health

    An introduction to the field of Medical Anthropology. Lecture reading and discussion will examine the social context of health and illness, looking at the diverse ways in which humans use cultural resources to cope with disease and develop medical systems. The course will provide an introduction to the overall theoretical frameworks that guide anthropological approaches to studying human health related behavior. Medical anthropology offers a unique and revealing perspective on the cultural diversity that characterizes human experiences of sexuality, disease, aging, mental illness, disability, inequality and death. DPLL LILE WRIT
    ANTH 0300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nye
  • Sound and Symbols: Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology

    This introduction to the study of language and culture considers how language not only reflects social reality but also creates it. We'll examine specific cases of broad current relevance, in the process learning how an analytical anthropological approach to language use lays bare its often hidden power. We'll consider how language creates and reinforces social inequality and difference, how language promotes and resists globalization, and how language is used creatively in performance, literature, film, advertising, and mass media. We will also consider how language does important social work in specific contexts, such as classrooms, courtrooms, medical settings, and political campaigns. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 0800 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
  • African Issues in Anthropological Perspective

    In this course we engage with anthropological literature and films on the diverse ethnicities, cultures, and "traditions" of sub-Saharan Africa. We trace the histories and the processes of cultural, social, and political change, beginning with colonialism and ending with the contemporary period. We will deconstruct and debunk dominant Western ideas of Africa that present it as primitive and characterized by poverty, AIDS, famine, and violence. We will learn about how Africans see and represent themselves through reading ethnographies, engaging with African popular culture, and watching documentary films. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1110 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Benton
  • Anthropology of China

    This course introduces students to contemporary Chinese culture and society, w/a focus on the rapid changes that have taken place during the post-Mao reform era in the People’s Republic of China (1978- present). Emphasis will be placed on the importance of historical and global context in developing an understanding of contemporary Chinese culture. Readings and lectures will draw primarily upon recent ethnographic work conducted in the PRC, but readings from the disciplines of history, political science, public health, and contemporary Chinese literature (in translation) will also be incorporated. Topics: family life, urbanization, housing, migration, gender, health/disease, labor, globalization, and cyberculture. LILE
    ANTH 1111 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mason
  • Archeological Ethnographies: Heritage and Community in the Mediterranean

    Archaeologists study objects and (socio-cultural) anthropologists investigate culture is how stereotype and conventions have long had it. As material culture studies have increasingly blurred these boundaries, the distinction is entirely meaningless when it comes to archaeological heritage. Taking its cue from material culture studies, this course explores how local communities experience the material remains from the past and (re)incorporate them into their contemporary lives. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1126 S01
    Primary Instructor
    van Dommelen
  • Ethnographies of the Muslim Middle East

    An introduction to ethnographic studies of Middle East, focus on: religion, language, modernity, gender, and political culture. Students will engage in critical examination which anthropologists sought to capture Middle Eastern life, and problems that have pervaded anthropological representation, methodologically and theoretically. You will learn, through the ways anthropologists approach the peoples, ideas, and cultures of the region in ways that complement and contradict the knowledge production of other disciplines, the processes we come to understand cultural difference, and ways this encounter sheds light on our selves and practices. Previous course in Anthropology/ Middle East studies is suggested. Enrollment limited to 25. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1151 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Straughn
  • Film and Anthropology: Identity and Images of Indian Societies

    The course examines representation of Indian society in film and anthropological literature. We compare how gender, national identity, religious practices, and historical events are portrayed in films and anthropological literature. We will explore the relationship between visual and textual, showing how film reflect and make comprehensible anthropological concepts of Indian culture, and creates different images of the society. DPLL LILE
    ANTH 1250 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
  • Anthropology of Addictions and Recovery

    The purpose of this course is to consider the uses and misuses alcohol, tobacco and drugs, and approaches to recovery from addictions. We will read some of the major cross cultural, ethnographic, linguistic, and social-political works on addictions. Students will have the opportunity to conduct their own anthropological interviews regarding substance misuse and recovery as well as observe a local 12 step recovery meeting. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE WRIT
    ANTH 1300 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Glasser
  • Global Historical Archaeology

    The course examines historical archaeology as a multidisciplinary approach to the study of the historic past. Draws in recent research from different parts of the world, including North America, South Africa, Australia, the Caribbean, and South America, to illustrate historical archaeology's contributions to interpreting peoples' everyday lives and the diversity of their experiences in the post-1500 era. LILE
    ANTH 1620 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Button
  • Maize Gods and Feathered Serpents: Mexico and Central America in Antiquity

    Mexico and Central America are the cradles of one of the world's most enduring cultural traditions. The modern identity of the region was forged in these ancient traditions and their influence is apparent the world over, particularly in the area of agricultural domesticates (corn, chocolate, and chilies). Their cities (Teotihuacan, Monte Alban, Chichen Itza, etc.) rank among the greatest of the ancient world. This course offers a survey of Pre-Columbian Mexico and Central America, from the early monumental centers of the Olmec to the great Aztec city of Tenochtitlan, and explores how anthropologists and archaeologists investigate Middle America's indigenous past.
    ANTH 1640 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
  • History of Anthropology: Anthropological Theories

    Looks at the way anthropological methods and theories have interlaced through history to understand the dominant concerns in present-day anthropology. What were the important issues that influenced the discipline's history? Who were the significant, and not so well known, historic personalities who shaped anthropological practice and gave it its identity? Enrollment limited to 20.
    ANTH 1900 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
  • Senior Seminar: Politics and Symbols

    Examination of key role played by symbols, myth, and ritual in politics. We examine symbols, myths, and rituals used to win support, create political reality, and form political groups, whether in defense of the status quo or creating movements seeking to overthrow it. The 2014 U.S. congressional, state, and local political campaigns receive attention. Students, in part working in groups, will engage in original research both on the 2014 American elections and a wide variety of historical and contemporary political developments, from the Arab Spring to the Occupy Wall Street movement. Prerequisites:ANTH 1621 or 1900; and either ANTH 1940 or 1950.
    ANTH 1910G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
  • Ethnographic Research Methods

    To understand the different theoretical assumptions that shape research efforts; to examine how hypotheses and research questions are formulated; and to appreciate the ethical and scientific dimensions of research by hands-on experience in fieldwork projects. Prerequisite: One Anthropology course.
    ANTH 1940 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
  • Individual Research Project

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Benton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Dicarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hollos
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S23
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S25
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 1970 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History of Ethnological Theory

    A seminar investigating some themes in the history of anthropological theory. Starting with the delineations of the scope and nature of social science by Marx, Durkheim, and Weber, the seminar then considers various explorations of the concepts of structure, function, and agency, concluding with Bourdieu's reformulation of social anthropology for a new generation in the form of practice theory.
    ANTH 2000 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
  • Professional Preparation for Anthropologists

    This course covers research ethics and politics, writing of proposals, theses, and articles, publishing, public speaking, CVs and resumes, and the job search.
    ANTH 2035 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Benton
  • Anthropology of State Power and Powerlessness

    How do we conceptualize state power? Is sovereign power primarily a capacity for force and coercion or a source of welfare and social cohesion? States the world over often do not manage to provide adequate welfare or to maintain a monopoly on violence. How then might we understand state power not only as a capacity but also in its incapacities and vulnerabilities? We engage these paradoxes of power through classic texts of anthropology and political theory including Foucault, Deleuze, Weber, Hobbes, and Rousseau, in tandem with lively ethnographic analyses of state power in its capacities and incapacities.
    ANTH 2315 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Singh
  • Linguistic Theory and Practice

    An introduction to theoretical and methodological issues in the study of language and social life. We begin by examining semiotic approaches to language. We turn to classical research on language as a structured system - covering such topics as phonology and grammatical categories - but we focus on the implications of such work for broader social scientific and humanistic research. We then consider areas of active contemporary research, including cognition and linguistic relativity, meaning and semantics, pronouns and deixis, deference and register, speech acts and performativity, interaction, verbal art and poetics, reported speech, performance, and linguistic ideology.
    ANTH 2800 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ANTH 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    ANTH 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Preucel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S02
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Scherer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Fruzzetti
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Faudree
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Benton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gutmann
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Hamdy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S11
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Hollos
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Houston
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Kertzer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S16
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S17
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S19
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Lutz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S21
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S22
    Primary Instructor
    McGarvey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Rubertone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Simmons
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S26
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Carter
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Warren
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ANTH 2980 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Leinaweaver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ANTH 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in Anthropology

    The following courses, listed in other departments, may be of interest to students concentrating in Anthropology. Please check the course listings of the sponsoring department for times and locations.

    Archaeology and Ancient World
    ARCH 0725 Great Migrations: Mobility, Displacement and Material Culture in the Ancient Mediterranean
    French Studies
    FREN 1710E War Machines: Violence and Social Forms in West Africa
    Middle Eastern Studies
    MES 0155 Cultures of the Contemporary Middle East
    Urban Studies
    URBN 0230 Urban Life in Providence: An Introduction
    ANTH XLIST 0