The arts at Brown
are alive and thriving! Look here for information on
CAC events
, or use the links at the left to see what is happening around campus.

Upcoming Events

New Work Unveiled: Refraction by Francesca Capone | January 20, 2014 - June 10, 2014  + -

Each year, the Granoff hosts a mural competition to fill the main entryway. This year, Francesca Capone’s design was chosen from among many promising submissions. Francesca is an artist, poet, and currently a Literary Art MFA candidates in Cross Disciplinary Writing at Brown.

 

In celebration of Brown's 250th anniversary, Francesca chose to highlight the Literary Arts Department. She would specifically like to honor Rosmarie and Keith Waldrop, whose creative and academic presence has been immeasurably important within the university and at large.  Francesca conceived of this mural by choosing a particular poem by the Waldrops and treating it as a paintbrush. Using digital media, she repeated the poem 250 times across, in a single stroke-like gesture.  She selected the poem Light Travels, a piece that Rosmarie and Keith wrote in collaboration.

 

View the mural now through the end of the semester in the main entryway at the Granoff.

Performance as Research: artistic, scientific and humanistic intersections in the academy | February 21, 2014 - April 19, 2014  + -

The Department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies (TAPS) announces a semester-long dialogue on Performance as Research: artistic, scientific and humanistic intersections in the academy featuring Margaret Wertheim, Science Writer and Founder of the Institute for Figuring, Choreographer Mark Morris and other renowned scholars and artists from Providence and around the country.



Throughout Spring 2014, TAPS will hosts artists and scholars at Brown who will help build dialogue among thinkers and makers across disciplines – disclosing, affirming and expanding on the capacities of art and performance to create and archive new knowledge, in direct integration with the sciences and the full range of humanities. Members of our community – across multiple artistic, scientific and humanistic disciplines - are invited to examine usually overlooked but vital facets of the role of theatre and performance in the academy. TAPS Department Chair Erik Ehn says:



Ethics, math, biology – all come into play when we set up stages built to quicken empathy and fuel the social construction of nuanced meaning. The performing arts provide similes and illustrations of refined disciplinary concepts, but they are also a means of thinking, discovering, assessing and documenting knowledge that lives well beyond conventional understandings of art for its own sake. The performing arts in the academy is a place where, in the creation and presentation of a performance with stakeholders across multiple disciplines, we create a space of “thoughtful and practical imagining” that lives outside the participants' signature languages or ways of communicating.



Through conversations, exhibits, performances and workshops, visiting artists, along with students and scholars at Brown will explore the department's interest in and ideas around Design for Performance. Design, as much as any other aspect of performance-craft, bodies forth our shared ideas of what it means to live, fully, responsible to each other. A series of linked events through the term invite wide-ranging contemplation of design in our various disciplines, and how our senses of space share faith in a plural, civic presence.



For a full list of events and information on this series, and to register for workshops, please go to: www.brown.edu/go/tapsdesigns2014



Widening the Circle: Intersections of Art, Science and Community (Feb. 21-March 8)

Widening the Circle: Intersections of Art, Science and Community is a series of master classes, lecture demonstrations, performances, and seminars.  TheWidening the Circle series includes three distinct yet interconnected programs: a Mark Morris Dance Group residency featuring a range of activities surrounding the choreographer hailed as "the Mozart of modern dance," a Symposium looking at the arts within a holistic healing approach, and a Mini-Fest exploring public engagement with arts and culture. Widening the Circle is presented by FirstWorks and American Dance Legacy Initiative, in collaboration with Artists and Scientists as Partners, Brown University, and Mark Morris Dance Group. This series includes an Artist-Up-Close: A Conversation with Mark Morris moderated by Debra Cash, critic and scholar-in-residence, Bates Dance Festival, Wednesday February 26 – 5:00pm at Granoff Center Martinos Auditorium, 154 Angell Street, Providence. This event is Free and open to the public. For more information on Widening the Circle events, go tohttp://wideningthecircle.weebly.com/




Shannon Scrofano, Scenic Designer at CalArts (March 10-14)

Shannon Scrofano's theatrical designs demonstrate how live performance can reshape the ways audiences and performers perceive the civic space, by creating work in the community itself. She does not design a facsimile of the environment on a traditional stage, but designs around the living environment. In her recent work that takes place in the Skid Row section of Los Angeles, the physical life of the performance “navigates fluidly amidst Skid Row's ecosystem.” Her designs help the actors (many of them from the community discover the truths of place. For more information on Shannon Scrofano’s residency go towww.brown.edu/go/tapsdesigns2014



Margaret Wertheim, Science Writer, Sculptor (April 14-18)

Margaret Wertheim's Hyperbolic Crochet Coral Reef is an art work and scientific research process that is continually in creation with thousands of women who fabricate parts of an ever-evolving yarn and plastic coral reef. At Brown, Wertheim will show how the exhibition and creation of the coral reef functions as research, a scholarly panel or conference. Though these clearly function in different ways, Wertheim's work and her discoveries have revealed a gravity, complexity, and specificity of concepts around hyperbolic space for the benefit of scientists, environmentalists, crocheters, and the public. Wertheim will present a talk Reefs, Rubbish and Reason: Bringing art and science together in the age of global warming at Martinos Auditorium, Granoff Center on April 14 at 5pm. She will also lead a series of workshops on her Coral Reef project and on her current interest in the pedagogical impacts of STEM to STEAM initiatives in k-12 education. For more information, and to register for workshops please go to: www.brown.edu/go/tapsdesigns2014



PearlDamour (Feb. 21 and April 15) and Everett (Feb. 22 and April 19)

Two companies in residence at Brown are embarking on projects tackling specific contemporary social issues. Both companies are constructing the pieces with students, community members, artists and scholars from multiple disciplines and perspectives, with the result being a process and performance in which there are new discoveries, but importantly, the artists develop new ways of communicating the discoveries to a broad audience. For PearlDamour's MILTON, their essential question is: in today’s changing world, is it possible to locate a definition for what it means to be an American? In what ways do people feel a personal connection to a shared American community? For Everett's FREEDOM PROJECT, they will look at racial and socio-economic disparities that influence the criminal justice system in Rhode Island. Both artistic companies are using a “Research to Performance” method in the creation of the pieces.Their aim is also pedagogical: making the evolution and process live and visible is intrinsic to the dialogue around the performances. For information on showings and exhibits go to: www.brown.edu/go/tapsdesigns2014



Our partners at Brown University:

Curt Columbus, Artistic Director, Trinity Repertory Company; Erik Ehn, Chair, Theatre Arts and Performance Studies; Richard Fishman, Director, Creative Arts Council; Caroline Karp, Lecturer, Environmental Studies; Michael McGarty, Scenic Designer, Theatre Arts and Performance Studies; Julie Strandberg,Director of Dance, Theatre Arts and Performance Studies; Kathy Takayama, Director, Sheridan Center; Annie Valk, Associate Director, Center for Public Humanities



Our Sponsors: TAPS, Creative Arts Council, MEME, MCM, Sheridan Center, Visual Art, Biology, Engineering, Science and Technology Studies, Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Office of the President, Humanities Initiative, Dean of Faculty

Hyperbolic Crochet Coral Reef co-creator Margaret Wertheim, in residence at Brown April 14-18 | April 14, 2014 - April 18, 2014  + -

Brown’s Department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies announces a weeklong residency with Margaret Wertheim, science writer and co-founder of the Hyperbolic Crochet Coral Reef project from April 14-18, 2014. Her residency opens with a public talk, Reefs, Rubbish and Reason: bringing art and science together in the age of global warming on Monday, April 14 at 5pm in Granoff Creative Arts Center, 154 Angell Street, Providence. The talk is free and open to the public.


In her opening talk, artist, writer and curator Margaret Wertheim will discuss the Crochet Coral Reef project and its unlikely conjunction of art, science, environmentalism and geometry. Tracing a line from sea slugs to general relativity and ocean acidification, Wertheim will raise the possibility that this nexus of art and science may encourage a shift in consciousness about humanity's role in the ecological future of our planet.

 

At a time when climate-change denial is at a peak, humanity urgently needs positive messages for social change. In 2006, as an aesthetic response to global warming, twin sisters Margaret and Christine Wertheim sat down to crochet a coral reef in their Los Angeles living room. Today their Crochet Coral Reef project is perhaps the largest art + science endeavor on the planet, with more than 7000 active participants worldwide and more than 3 million exhibition visitors.

 

Margaret Wertheim continues her residency in Providence with a series of workshops, conversations and talks with the Brown, RISD and local community, to discuss how she has pioneered creative new methods for engaging the public about scientific and environmental issues by putting people and communities at the core.

 

Her residency is part of TAPS' Performance as Research: a semester exploring intersecting artistic, scientific, and humanistic discovery in the academy, funded by the Humanities Initiative, the Creative Arts Council, the Department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies, Office of the President, Pembroke, History, Science and Technology Studies, the Environmental Change Initiative and Applied Math and Mathematics.

 

For more information, and to register for workshops and discussions, please go to:

www.brown.edu/go/wertheimschedule


Anthology 4 | April 16, 2014  + -

AN ECLECTIC EVENING OF READINGS, PERFORMANCES AND VISUAL WORKS FEATURING THE GRADUATE STUDENTS OF BROWN UNIVERSITY & THE RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN

Desiree Bailey
Francesca Capone 
Andy Giannakakis
Ian Hatcher
Jazzmen Johnson
Ari Kalinowski
Maya Krinsky 
Lucia Monge 
Roque Montez
Kelly Puig
Asha Tamirisa

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014
at 7 P.M.
The Granoff Center 
Studio 1
154 Angell Street
Providence, RI 02906
RSVP on facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/events/671486632916182/

Hosted by The Creative Arts Council and The Department of Literary Arts

Everett's FREEDOM PROJECT | April 19, 2014  + -

Everett's FREEDOM PROJECT

April 19th, Studio 1 at 4pm

PearlDamour (Feb. 21 and April 15) and Everett (Feb. 22 and April 19)

Two companies in residence at Brown are embarking on projects tackling specific contemporary social issues. Both companies are constructing the pieces with students, community members, artists and scholars from multiple disciplines and perspectives, with the result being a process and performance in which there are new discoveries, but importantly, the artists develop new ways of communicating the discoveries to a broad audience. For PearlDamour's MILTON, their essential question is: in today’s changing world, is it possible to locate a definition for what it means to be an American? In what ways do people feel a personal connection to a shared American community? For Everett's FREEDOM PROJECT, they will look at racial and socio-economic disparities that influence the criminal justice system in Rhode Island. Both artistic companies are using a “Research to Performance” method in the creation of the pieces.Their aim is also pedagogical: making the evolution and process live and visible is intrinsic to the dialogue around the performances. For information on showings and exhibits go to: www.brown.edu/go/tapsdesigns2014

COLLABORATION – REVISITING THE HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY | April 21, 2014 - April 25, 2014  + -

COLLABORATION – REVISITING THE HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY  

A Photo-Lab at Brown University 

Lower Lobby, Granoff Center (154 Angell St) 

On view 8:30 AM - 10:00 PM, April 21-25, 2014

**Open Forum with Curators: 3:00 - 6:00 PM, Friday, April 25, 2014** 

Studio 1, Granoff Center

Reception to follow

Curated by Ariella Azoulay, Wendy Ewald, and Susan Meiselas 

In collaboration with Nathan Lee, Drew Ludwig, Nupur Mathur, Rijuta Mehta, Francisco Monar, Tyler Theus, graduate students at Modern Culture and Media, (Brown University) and RISD Photo (Rhode Island School of Design).

This photo laboratory seeks to reconstruct the material, practical and political conditions of collaboration through photography and of photography through collaboration. 

The first installation of this photo-lab was held at the Aperture Gallery in New York in December 2013. Re-engaging with the history of photography through this second installation at the Granoff Center, we seek ways to foreground – and create – the tension between the collaborative process and the photographic product by reconstructing the participation of others, usually the more “silent” participants. We try to do this through the presentation of a large repertoire of types of collaborations, those which take place at the moment when a photograph is taken, or others that are understood as collaboration only later, when a photograph is reproduced and disseminated, juxtaposed to another, read by others, investigated, explored, preserved, and accumulated in an archive to create a new database.

The Unraveling Ball Book | May 8, 2014  + -

Kelly Puig will present her thesis projct The Unraveling Ball Book at the McCormack Family Theater on May 8th at 7pm.  

 

Kelly's project, an unraveling story that consists of 50 yards of continuous cotton ribbo that has been wound into a ball, follows the narrative of the preoccupations of a modern-day Ariadne.  In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete, best known as Mistress of the Labrynth who, with her ball of living thread, saved Theseus from the dreaded Minotaur.  At once an unfurling of the cosmos and one woman's consciousness, the text of the project is likewise an ode to the imagination's ever-unfolding terrain as well as an enactment of the writing process itself.

Funded in part by the Creative Arts Council

May 8th, 7pm, McCormack Family Theater

OPENSIGNAL Presents Spring 2014 Experimental Electronic Music Series Two-Day Festival | May 16, 2014 - May 17, 2014  + -

OPENSIGNAL Presents Spring 2014 Experimental Electronic Music Series

 

PROVIDENCE RI [Brown University] — opensignal, an artist collective formed through the Brown University Music Department’s MEME [Multimedia + Electronic Music Experiments] program is organizing an exciting colloquium and concert series surrounding issues of gender and race in electronic music.

The culminating event will be a two-day festival on Friday and Saturday, May 16th and 17th at the Granoff Center. Friday will feature headliner Blectum from Blechdom (duo of Kristin Erickson and Bevin Kelley) as well as numerous local acts. On Saturday, there will be talks, roundtable discussions, art installations, and daytime concerts featuring Brown students, alums and local artists. Saturday evening’s concert will feature headliner Maria Chavez. There will be records and other merchandise for sale throughout the festival, including opensignal’s first compilation.

 About opensignal

opensignal is a collective of artists based in Providence RI concerned with the state of gender and race in experimental electronic music and art practices. opensignal operates with generous funding and support from the Brown University Department of Music and MEME program, the Brown University Creative Arts Council Arts Initiative Grant, the Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning’s new Mentorship Initiative, and the Pembroke Center’s Steinhaus/Zisson Research Grant.

 About MEME

MEME (Multimedia & Electronic Music Experiments) is an interdisciplinary program within the Brown University Music Department that focuses on the creative use of emerging technology for real-time interactive performance and installation. MEME@brown is known for art and research that traverse the boundaries between computer music, installation, video, theater and dance. As part of the larger Brown and RISD digital media community, MEME@brown provides expertise and promotes research in real-time electronic music, instrument design, interactive video, motion tracking and other hardware/software. MEME@brown resources include its faculty and staff, undergraduate and graduate course offerings, and fully-equipped state-of-the-art studios, labs and performance venues. MEME@brown promotes collaborative research and creative projects among composers, computer scientists, writers, visual artists, choreographers and others. Local, national and international artists are featured regularly at MEME concerts, symposia, and workshops.

 

For updated information, you can visit www.cargocollective.com/opensignal or email openopensignal@gmail.com