Brown University School of Engineering

News from June, 2013

Brown is a project site for AAU STEM effort

Hands-on learning, purple lab gloves and all:

The Association of American Universities (AAU) has chosen Brown University as a project site for an initiative to improve undergraduate education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Brown is one of eight AAU member institutions chosen to implement the initiative, which is designed to encourage STEM departments to adopt proven, evidence-based teaching practices and to provide faculty with the encouragement, training, and support to do so.


Brown/RISD + Yale + Harvard Workshop

Light as Material

Students from Yale, Brown, Harvard, and RISD spent the day exploring the material properties of light. The workshop was hosted at the Yale Center for Engineering, Innovation, and Design and facilitated by Joe Zinter, Ian Gonsher, Beth Altringer, and Neils Cosman. 


ENGN 0930

DesignStudio: Kinetic Sculpture

Students disassembled the materials at hand - discarded computers, printers, and other equipment headed for the recycling bin. From these raw materials we created kinetic sculptures.


U.S. SEN. WHITEHOUSE, U.S. REP LANGEVIN

Whitehouse, Langevin tour brain science labs

A wireless implantable brain sensor:

U.S. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse and U.S. Rep. Jim Langevin braved heavy rain Friday, June 7, 2013, to visit two high-tech brain science-related labs at Brown.


Over 1,000 Citations

Kumar's paper among most cited in Acta Materialia

Professor Sharvan Kumar:

Among the most cited papers in bulk nanostructured materials (BNM) in the field of materials science is a paper by Brown University Professor Sharvan Kumar. His paper, “Mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline metals and alloys,” written with H. Van Swygenhoven, and S. Suresh was first published in 2003. Of the more than 8,300 papers that have been published in Acta Materialia, a premier journal in the field, Kumar’s paper ranks fourth all-time in number of citations. At present, it has been cited more than 1,000 times.


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