Courses for Fall 2014

  • Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

    An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. S/NC.
    ENGL 0110 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    ENGL 0110 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
    ENGL 0110 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    ENGL 0110 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Deboer-Langworthy
    ENGL 0110 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    ENGL 0110 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Naughton
    ENGL 0110 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Regunathan
    ENGL 0110 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Keck
    ENGL 0110 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Beaver
    ENGL 0110 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    ENGL 0110 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Tan
    ENGL 0110 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    ENGL 0110 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
  • Critical Reading and Writing II: The Research Essay

    For the confident writer. Offers students who have mastered the fundamentals of the critical essay an opportunity to acquire the skills to write a research essay, including formulation of a research problem, use of primary evidence, and techniques of documentation. Topics are drawn from literature, history, the social sciences, the arts, and the sciences. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0130 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    ENGL 0130 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
  • Journalistic Writing

    An introduction to journalistic writing that focuses on techniques of investigation, reporting, and feature writing. Uses readings, visiting journalists, and field experience to address ethical and cultural debates involving the profession of journalism. Writing assignments range from news coverage of current events to investigative feature articles. Writing sample required. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of class. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0160 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    ENGL 0160 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for ENGL 1180. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0180 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    ENGL 0180 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Resnick
    ENGL 0180 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Resnick
    ENGL 0180 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    ENGL 0180 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Solomon-Greenbaum
  • Shakespeare

    We will read a selection of Shakespeare’s plays with attention to both formal and historical questions. Issues to be addressed may include genre, the Shakespearean text, gender, sexuality, consciousness, status and degree, politics and nation. Written work to include a mid-term and two short papers. LILE WRIT
    ENGL 0310A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
  • The Literature of Identity

    This course will explore various conceptions of personal identity, with an emphasis on Romanticism. We'll read Anglo-American philosophical and literary texts (mostly poetry) from the Renaissance through the 19th century, taking some excursions into contemporary theory (queer, feminist, post-structuralist). Writers may include Shakespeare, Montaigne, Locke, Hume, Rousseau, Wordsworth, Keats, Emerson, Browning, and Wilde. DPLL LILE
    ENGL 0500J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • American History and the Literary Imagination

    This course explores twentieth- and twenty-first-century literary representations of the nineteenth century. We will primarily read novels, poetry, and cultural criticism regarding the U.S.'s antebellum period with particular emphasis on colonial expansion, slavery, and the civil war. We will consider how genre impacts historical interpretation in fictional histories, the recasting of historical events through marginal figures, and the contested though necessary role of memory in both literary and historical discourse.
    ENGL 0510T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Clytus
  • Coupling: The Literature of Courtship

    This course examines the courtship plot in the Anglo-American literary tradition, concentrating on novels of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries but extending forward to twentieth-century and contemporary novels, and explores how these fictions have constructed and challenged normative narratives of gender and sexuality.
    ENGL 0510W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hunt
  • City Novels

    This course examines 20th and 21st century novels to consider how these narratives envision the city, its possibilities and limits. How does the city shape how we think, wander, grow up, see and know each other? How does the city divide people? How does the novel imagine ways to bridge those divisions? Readings by Woolf, Chandler, Wright, Cisneros, Smith, Calvino, Adiga, Whitehead.
    ENGL 0710A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • The Dead and the Living

    Explores ethical, historical, and personal dilemmas in modernism through the relation between the dead and the living. What claims do the dead have on the living? How do the living shape the lives of the dead? Readings in literature, psychoanalysis, and philosophy, including Henry James, Virginia Woolf, Walter Benjamin, Sigmund Freud, James Joyce, W. G. Sebald, and Julian Barnes. LILE
    ENGL 0710D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • Postcolonial Tales of Transition

    This course focuses on postcolonial British, Anglo-Caribbean, and South African works that exemplify or refashion the category of the bildungsroman, the novel of education. Issues to be considered include the ways the texts rework archetypal tropes of initiation, development, and the interplay of contradictory passions. We will also think about ways in which issues of race, gender, and sexuality emerge in the texts, and the connections or disjunctions between literature and the world of actions, reality and individual perception. Writers include Coetzee, Ghosh, Ishiguro, Joyce, Lamming, Marechera, Naipaul, Rhys, Schreiner.
    ENGL 0710E S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and the Lost Generation

    An introduction to two of the most popular and influential American novelists of the twentieth century, Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. We will read many of their most important novels and stories, including The Great Gatsby, Tender is the Night, In Our Time, The Sun Also Rises, and A Farewell to Arms. In addition we will examine the work of the contemporary American writers who most influenced them: Gertrude Stein, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, and T. S. Eliot.
    ENGL 0710N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • The Simple Art of Murder

    This course surveys the history of criminal enterprise in twentieth-century American culture. Drawing from a broad range of sources ("literary" novels and pulp fiction, B-movies and auteurist features), we will assess the role of crime as object of aesthetic attention and attend to the questions that can arise about the idea of the criminal when one takes it up outside of its usual home in courts. Authors: Poe, Hammett, Fitzgerald, Chandler, Wright, Petry, Hughes, Butler. Directors: Hitchcock, Wilder, Huston, Truffaut, Pakula, Lupino. Limited to 20 first-year students. FYS
    ENGL 0760P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • How To Read A Poem

    It is difficult/To get the news from poems/Yet men die miserably every day/For lack/Of what is found there. These lines from William Carlos Williams begin to articulate the purpose of this course. The human species for thousands of years has found ways to intensify and order experience through the language of poetry. The ability to read this kind of language well is an enduring life skill. Designed for non-concentrators and English concentrators, the course addresses both conceptual and practical issues of understanding poetry. Readings draw on a wide range of British and American writers, including Wyatt, Shakespeare, Donne, Blake, Keats, Dickinson, Cummings, Frost, Bishop, and Heaney. LILE
    ENGL 0910A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • Narrative

    This course offers a broad exploration of the many kinds of essays you can write in creative nonfiction. We will be looking at how authors structure their pieces and the range of narrative techniques they often use. You can expect workshops, in-class prompts and readings by Jamaica Kincaid, John McPhee, David Foster Wallace, Annie Dillard, David Sedaris and others. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
  • True Stories

    This class will allow confident writers to explore and develop their creative nonfiction writing. We'll focus on two structures--nonfiction narratives and essays--with occasional forays into other forms. Students will work simultaneously on several small assignments and two larger, self-directed pieces. Readings will include cultural reportage, lyric memoir, science and nature writing, standard and hybrid essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Creative Nonfiction: Practice and Criticism

    What is Creative Nonfiction? It has a long history and recently writers have flocked to it; scholars have questioned it: Academic enough? Harm the truth? Narrative with too much “I” and too little “Eye”? Literary? Significant? By reading historical and contemporary examples along with critics, we will explore persistent questions about form, method, ethics, and significance. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
  • Literary Journalism: Writing about Culture

    Students are introduced to procedures and techniques of cultural journalism through reading and discussing work of notable practitioners and writing their own reviews, profiles, and reportage. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisites: ENGL0110, ENGL0130, ENGL0160, ENGL0180, or any advanced nonfiction course. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
  • Digital Nonfiction

    Digital Nonfiction is an opportunity to explore the fundamental differences between print and digital narratives. Focusing on three short assignments and one longer project, this class encourages students to learn by doing. Additionally, students develop their digital fluency by exploring a variety of platforms and readings. Digital Nonfiction is an advanced creative nonfiction class that requires ENGL 0130, 0160, or 0180. Enrollment is limited to 17. Instructor permission required. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • Writing Medical Narrative

    This class will examine the recent turn toward the use of narrative in medicine and the recent trend of published medical narrative. We'll look at literary and cultural narratives of sickness and health and how they shape perceptions and treatments, while keeping the science and politics of health care—and its public discourse—in view. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0110, 0130, 0160, 0180, 1140, 1160, 1180, or 1190. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • The Art of Literary Nonfiction

    For the advanced writer. Based on Roland Barthes' notion of the fragment, this workshop features an incremental, literary approach to writing nonfiction, in both traditional and experimental formats. In response to daily assignments, students will produce numerous short pieces and three extended "essays," to be gathered into a chapbook at the end of the course. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, 0180, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Not open to first year students. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Special Delivery: Letters and Diaries

    For the advanced writer. While letters and diaries are constrained by "dailiness"--the writer's informal situation in time--they often form the basis of more formal communications, including the novel. We will keep diaries as self-conscious intellectual enterprises and write letters to address their roles in various literary modes. The final project will be an epistolary essay incorporating structures and motifs from both sub-genres. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, or 0180, or instructor permission. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor permission.
    ENGL 1180M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Deboer-Langworthy
  • Further Adventures in Creative Nonfiction

    For the advanced writer. A workshop course for students who have taken ENGL 0180 or the equivalent and are looking for further explorations of voice and form. Work can include personal essays, literary journalism and travel writing. Readings from Ian Frazier, Joan Didion, David Sedaris, John McPhee and others. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, 0180, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
  • The Teaching and Practice of Writing: Writing Fellows Program

    For students accepted as Writing Fellows, this course offers the study of literary essays and composition theory to help develop their own writing with a critical awareness of the elements of an essay. Students will write essays throughout the semester and will confer with each other for every paper, thereby gaining experience in peer tutoring and becoming better writers through the help of an informed peer. They will also respond to the writing of a cohort of students in another designated Writing Fellows class. Enrollment is restricted to undergraduates who have been accepted into the Writing Fellows Program in the preceding July. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1190M S01
    Primary Instructor
    McSharry
    ENGL 1190M S02
    Primary Instructor
    McSharry
  • Independent Study in Nonfiction Writing

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward some work in progress by the student. Requires submission of a written proposal to a faculty supervisor. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1200 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Deboer-Langworthy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S48
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S53
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Hamlet, in Theory

    An intensive study of "Hamlet"--an enduringly significant Renaissance cultural artifact, yet one of Shakespeare's most difficult, enigmatic plays. Rather than surveying its highlights, we'll linger over "Hamlet" scene-by-scene, even line-by-line. We'll also engage various theoretical methodologies--psychoanalysis, Marxism, deconstruction, new historicism, feminism, queer theory--as tools for forging different readings of "Hamlet." What questions does each approach open up (and obscure)? This is a "theory in practice" course: an introduction to theory via the close study of a single, important text. Finally, we'll consider three "Hamlet" films. Not open to first-year students. Limited to English, Comparative Literature, Literary Arts, and MCM concentrators.
    ENGL 1311K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • Seminar in Old English Literature

    This course will offer a thorough introduction to the earliest period of English language and literature, and allow students, by the end of the course, to read and appreciate a language that is both intriguingly foreign and importantly familiar. We will start with an extensive coverage of grammar and syntax, before reading short texts, and Old English poetry, including excerpts from Beowulf. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first-year students.
    ENGL 1360H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Renaissance Poetry and Visual Cultures

    How do ways of seeing and ways of writing intersect in renaissance works of art? How do portraits, letters, and lyrics produce individual subjects? How do anatomies and nudes reinscribe the body? How do architecture, epic, and theater position the human environment? Are image and word compatible in religious faith? Petrarch, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, Milton.
    ENGL 1361B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Kahn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S54
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S58
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • American Poetry I: Puritans through the Nineteenth Century

    Survey of the invention and development of American poetic traditions. Readings include Bradstreet, Taylor, Wheatley, Freneau, Bryant, Emerson, Poe, Whitman, Melville, Dickinson, and Frost.
    ENGL 1511O S01
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
  • Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism: The American Novel and its Traditions

    This course charts the course of American novel from the Civil War to the present. We will attend to the development of a distinctly novelistic literary tradition in American writing over the period and to the interactions between this tradition of literary novel writing and the emergence commercial novelistic generic forms (ie. the detective novel, science fiction). We will also consider the novel’s relations to alternative literary modes (narrative history, the sketch, the short story, the occasional essay) and to alternative media (film, television, music). Melville, Twain, DuBois, James, Fitzgerald, Hammett, Hurston, Wright, Nabokov, Butler, Morrison, Dick, Didion.
    ENGL 1511P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Scandalous Victorians

    This course examines the literature and culture of Victorian Britain through the lens of scandal. Particular attention will be paid to questions of gender, sexuality, class and social mobility, and national and imperial identity, as well as to the dynamics of scandal and the processes of social change.
    ENGL 1511R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hunt
  • Emily Dickinson

    An intensive reading of the work of Emily Dickinson in the context of her most important poetic predecessors and heirs. Other poets we will be reading will include John Donne, John Keats, Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, and Susan Howe. Students will be expected to have some familiarity with reading lyric poetry. Limited to 20 junior and senior concentrators in English, Comparative Literature, Literary Arts, French Studies, Hispanic Studies, Italian Studies.
    ENGL 1561Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S56
    Primary Instructor
    Clytus
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • The Literature and Culture of Black Power Reconsidered

    This course reexamines the Black Power movement as a signal development in American literature and culture. We will read classics from the period with a view toward reassessing the nuances and complexities of their form and politics. At the same time, we will recover less familiar texts that complicate conventional understandings of what defines this movement. Authors include Malcolm X, Huey P. Newton, Angela Davis, Eldridge Cleaver, John Edgar Wideman, Ernest Gaines, and Amiri Baraka. DPLL
    ENGL 1710P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • India in English

    This course explores the cultural and literary effects of colonial encounter in the context of British imperialism, and offers an introduction to transnational critical theory. Texts include C20th fiction, poetry, drama, criticism, films and visual art, including works by E. M. Forster, Rudyard Kipling, Arundhati Roy, Mohsin Hamid, Vikram Seth, Subaltern Studies historians, and the Bombay Progressive Artists Group.
    ENGL 1711F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
  • American and British Poetry Since 1945

    Study of poetry after 1945. Readings include Bishop, Plath, Ashbery, Merrill, O'Hara, Heaney, Larkin, Walcott, Rich, Dove. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE
    ENGL 1760G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
  • The Texts of Africa

    This seminar considers the various ways in which “Africa” has been depicted in fictional and non-fictional writing from the nineteenth-century on. We begin with classic travel writing by European missionaries (Park, Livingstone, Moffat), and their African and black diasporic counterparts (Crowther, Freeman, Sims, Soga). We then turn to twentieth-century literature and non-fiction (Abrahams, Conrad, Dinesen, Greene, Ndebele, Wright), closely following the rhetorical devices used to evoke the continent as geographical or subjective reality. We will pay particular attention to questions of history, linguistic representation, and the vagaries of intercultural encounter. DPLL
    ENGL 1760T S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Kubrick

    A consideration of Kubrick's feature-film oeuvre with a focus on his war films ("Paths of Glory"; "Dr. Strangelove"; "2001"; "Full Metal Jacket"); sports films ("Day of the Fight," his first documentary; "Killer's Kiss"); and sex films ("Lolita"; "A Clockwork Orange"; "Eyes Wide Shut"). Limited to 20 junior and senior concentrators in English and MCM.
    ENGL 1762D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Queer Relations: Aesthetics and Sexuality

    A study of the relationship between aesthetic thought and sexuality in a variety of literary and cinematic works. We will supplement our readings with ventures into queer theory, emphasizing how art is related to identity, community, race, gender, and ethics. Authors include Wilde, Pater, James, Winterson, Cole, Guibert, Foucault, Bersani, Edelman. Films by Julien and Jarman. DPLL
    ENGL 1900R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Art of Criticism

    This course explores the art of literary criticism through analysis of individual critics as well as larger schools of criticism. Focusing on the twentieth century, we will read works by those affiliated with high theory as well as those who stood outside that influential development. The goal will be to understand literary criticism as a form of thinking, and an art, in its own right, one with philosophical, social, and literary dimensions. Authors will include: Oscar Wilde, T. S. Eliot, Kenneth Burke, William Empson, Mary McCarthy, Lionel Trilling, Raymond Williams, Paul de Man, Eve Sedgwick, D. A. Miller, John Guillory.
    ENGL 1901F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
  • Law and Literature

    This seminar explores the conceptual, psychological and rhetorical connections between literature and law, examining how both disciplines shape the imagination but also aim to elicit response and responsibility. We will consider how literary works, legal writings, and legal opinions inform each other, but also illuminate each other’s blind spots. Looking beyond trial scenes, the course invites students to think about how principles and notions in law structure, and are structured by, literature and language. Authors include Walter Benjamin, Joseph Conrad, Albert Camus, Rebecca West, and Chinua Achebe; legal texts by Holmes, Bentham, Cover and a number of judicial opinions. Limited to 20 senior English concentrators.
    ENGL 1950F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • Senior Honors Seminar in English

    Weekly seminar led by the Advisor of Honors in English. Introduces students to sustained literary-critical research and writing skills necessary to successful completion of the senior thesis. Particular attention to efficient ways of developing literary-critical projects, as well as evaluating, incorporating, and documenting secondary sources. Enrollment limited to English concentrators whose applications to the Honors in English program have been accepted. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. S/NC
    ENGL 1991 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Senior Honors Thesis in English

    Independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in English. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Senior Honors Seminar in Nonfiction Writing

    This course is designed for students accepted into the Nonfiction Honors Program. It will be run in workshop format, and will focus on research skills and generative and developmental writing strategies for students embarking on their thesis projects. Weekly assignments will be directed toward helping students work through various stages in their writing processes. Students will be expected to respond thoughtfully and constructively in peer reviewing one another's work. Open to seniors who have been admitted to the Honors Program in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing

    Independent research and writing under the direction of the student’s Nonfiction Writing honors supervisor. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor for Nonfiction Writing. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Graduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Kahn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • American Literature Without Borders

    A seminar examining the "post-national" turn in American literary studies, with a special emphasis on transatlantic and hemispheric theories and methodologies. The course analyzes the place (or absence) of the aesthetic in these new critical approaches while considering historical and contemporary theories of aesthetics. Critical readings will include Brickhouse, Gilroy, Gruesz, and Levander, and Roach, among others, and such writers as Wheatley, Jefferson, Hawthorne, George Washington Cable, Marti, and Du Bois. Limited to English PhD students.
    ENGL 2561H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
  • Satire and Irony

    Satire is not so much a genre as it is a mode of discourse, like irony, that resists formal constraints and can function in almost any kind of text. Satire’s dynamic contradictions (reform and frustration; laughter and anger; topicality and generality; purposefulness and pointlessness; public and private) enliven early modern texts, and complicate the relationship between language and meaning. Theories of satire provide a framework for the study of its history and practice. Emphasis falls on the great age of satire (especially the works of Jonathan Swift and his contemporaries) but some attention will be given to earlier and later examples. Limited to graduate students. Qualified undergraduates will be permitted to register at the instructor's discretion.
    ENGL 2561J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
  • Graduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S30
    Primary Instructor
    McLaughlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Black Internationalism and Its Discontents

    This seminar reassesses the broad influence of internationalism in African American letters from the age of abolition to the present. We will be concerned with literary writings that foreground the global struggle of black subjects to assert political agency in relation to Western imperialism and transatlantic slavery. Equally crucial will be a reconsideration of an established body of theoretical writings that conceive of diasporic modes of solidarity and cultural expression as alternatives to the black nationalist intellectual tradition. Authors include Martin Delany, W.E.B Du Bois, Richard Wright, Angela Davis, Brent Edwards, and Paul Gilroy.
    ENGL 2761C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Graduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Seminar in Pedagogy and Composition Theory

    An experimental and exploratory investigation into writing as a preparation for teaching college-level writing. Reviews the history of writing about writing, from Plato to current discussions on composition theory. Against this background, examines various processes of reading and writing. Emphasizes the practice of writing, including syllabus design. Priority given to students in the English Ph.D. program. Undergraduates admitted only with permission of instructor.
    ENGL 2950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ENGL 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ENGL 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in English

    These courses, offered in other departments, are cross listed with the English Department and do not require advisor approval to count toward the concentration for English concentrators. Please refer to the primary department for registration details.

    Gender and Sexuality Studies
    GNSS 1960W Fiction/Addiction
    Judaic Studies
    JUDS 0050A Believers Agnostics and Atheists in Contemporary Fiction
    JUDS 0830 The Bible as Literature
    Religious Studies
    RELS 0090I Radical Romantics: Politics, Ecology and Religion
    Political Science
    POLS 2355 The Politics of Precariousness and Resilience
    Slavic Languages
    RUSS 1840 Nabokov
    ENGL XLIST 0