Courses for Spring 2015

  • Critical Reading and Writing I: The Academic Essay

    An introduction to university-level writing. Students produce and revise multiple drafts of essays, practice essential skills of paragraph organization, and develop techniques of critical analysis and research. Readings from a wide range of texts in literature, the media, and academic disciplines. Assignments move from personal response papers to formal academic essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0110 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    ENGL 0110 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    ENGL 0110 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Swarbrick
    ENGL 0110 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Solomon-Greenbaum
    ENGL 0110 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Naughton
  • Critical Reading and Writing II: The Research Essay

    For the confident writer. Offers students who have mastered the fundamentals of the critical essay an opportunity to acquire the skills to write a research essay, including formulation of a research problem, use of primary evidence, and techniques of documentation. Topics are drawn from literature, history, the social sciences, the arts, and the sciences. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample may be required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0130 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    ENGL 0130 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Deboer-Langworthy
  • Journalistic Writing

    An introduction to journalistic writing that focuses on techniques of investigation, reporting, and feature writing. Uses readings, visiting journalists, and field experience to address ethical and cultural debates involving the profession of journalism. Writing assignments range from news coverage of current events to investigative feature articles. Writing sample required. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of class. Enrollment limited to 17. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0160 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mooney
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

    Designed to familiarize students with the techniques and narrative structures of creative nonfiction. Reading and writing focus on personal essays, memoir, science writing, travel writing, and other related subgenres. May serve as preparation for ENGL 1180. Writing sample may be required. Enrollment limited. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 0180 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    ENGL 0180 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
    ENGL 0180 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Resnick
    ENGL 0180 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Hardy
    ENGL 0180 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    ENGL 0180 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Resnick
    ENGL 0180 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
    ENGL 0180 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Golaski
  • All Eyes On You: Voyeurism and Surveillance Culture

    Can one both fear and delight in the knowledge of being watched? How is desire produced in voyeurism or exhibitionism? This course will explore the importance, danger and seduction of voyeuristic observation and surveillance culture through the lens of several 20th century American novels and films. Authors include Nobokov, James and Pychon. Films include "Lolita," "Rear Window" and "Brokeback Mountain." Enrollment limited to 17.
    ENGL 0200A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Tan
  • Beowulf to Aphra Behn: The Earliest British Literatures

    Major texts and a few surprises from literatures composed in Old English, Old Irish, Anglo-Norman, Middle English, and Early Modern English. We will read texts in their historical and cultural contexts. Texts include anonymously authored narratives like Beowulf and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, selected Canterbury Tales by Chaucer, and texts by Sir Thomas Malory, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Aphra Behn. Enrollment limited to 30.
    ENGL 0300F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Altered States

    A course about ecstasy, rapture, transport, travel, mysticism, metamorphosis, and magic in pre- and early modern verse, drama, and prose, including: Ovid (Metamorphoses), Shakespeare (A Midsummer Night's Dream; Othello), Marlowe (Dr. Faustus), Mandeville's Travels; the writings of the medieval female mystics Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe; the ecstatic verse of Crashaw, and the erotic, at times pornographic, verse of Donne, Herrick, Carew, Rochester, and Behn. Enrollment limited to 30.
    ENGL 0300J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • Shakespeare

    We will read a selection of Shakespeare’s plays with attention to both formal and historical questions. Issues to be addressed may include genre, the Shakespearean text, gender, sexuality, consciousness, status and degree, politics and nation. Written work to include a mid-term and two short papers. LILE WRIT
    ENGL 0310A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
    ENGL 0310A C01
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    ENGL 0310A C02
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
  • Nineteenth-Century British Novel

    The novel in nineteenth-century Britain was a hugely popular cultural form, much like the serial television drama today. It was also a form of cultural expression that began to compete with the claims and consolations of some of the most influential intellectual and moral discourses of the time, including social science and religion. In this course we will read many of the most popular and accomplished novels of the era, with a view to examining artistic forms and styles in relation to both thematic concerns and social, historical, and literary contexts. Authors: Austen, Bronte, Gaskell, Eliot, Dickens, Collins, Wilde.
    ENGL 0510U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
  • The Transatlantic American Novel

    This course reads American literature across national boundaries, focusing on the novel genre and the question of "American" identity as a problem in itself. The course takes up this problem in a wide array of novels spanning the period between the late eighteenth and twentieth centuries. Writers include Crevecoeur, Susanna Rowson, Poe, Melville, Twain, and Nella Larsen. Limited to 20 first-year students. FYS
    ENGL 0560G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
  • The Sensational and the Real in Victorian Fiction

    This course will explore two modes through which Victorian novels engaged the turbulent experience of their time: realism and sensation. We will examine how these different genres tackled issues of gender, sexuality, class, and personal and community identity. Enrollment limited to 20 first-year students. FYS
    ENGL 0560H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hunt
  • Introduction to Modernism: Past, Future, Exile, Home

    An introduction to European Modernism with an emphasis on British Literature. We will address ideas of personal and national history through literary and aesthetic innovations of the first half of the 20th century, as well as the relationship--literary, cultural, historical and psychological--between constructions of home and abroad. Texts include James, Conrad, Forster, Joyce, Proust, Woolf, Faulkner, Waugh, and Freud, as well as films by Sergei Eisenstein and Fritz Lang. Enrollment limited to 30.
    ENGL 0700F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • American Fiction and Mass Culture

    How have American fiction writers responded to the growing national influence of mass culture industries such as recorded music, film, and television? This course will consider this question by assessing both how writers have imagined the impact of mass culture on American life and how the style of literary writing has evolved in relation to popular media. Authors include F. Scott Fitzgerald, Nathanael West, Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead, and Don Delillo. Enrollment limited to 30.
    ENGL 0700G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Cultures and Countercultures: The American Novel after World War II

    A study of the postwar American novel in the context of the intellectual history of the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. We will read the postwar novel in relation to the affluent society, the vital center, the lonely crowd, the power elite, the one-dimensional man, the post-industrial society. Authors to be considered include Baldwin, Bellow, Ellison, Highsmith, McCarthy, O'Connor, Petry, Pynchon, and Roth. Two lectures and one discussion meeting weekly. Enrollment limited to 30. Students should register for ENGL 0700H S01 and may be assigned to conference sections by the instructor during the first week of class.
    ENGL 0700H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Introduction to Asian American Literature

    This course is intended to familiarize students with key issues that have shaped the study of Asian American writings and to provide a sense of the historical conditions out of which those works have emerged. As a literature course, it will focus on textual analysis--on how particular texts give representational shape to the social, historical and psychological experiences they depict. Readings consist primarily of works that have a canonical status within Asian American literary studies but also include newer works that suggest new directions in the field. It also strives to provide some coverage of the major ethnic groups. DPLL
    ENGL 0710J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
  • Literature and the Visual Arts

    How do words and images represent? Are the processes by which literature and the visual arts render the world similar or different? Is reading a novel or a poem more like or unlike viewing a painting, a sculpture, or a film? This seminar will analyze important theoretical statements about these questions as well as selected literary and visual examples. Limited to 20 first-year students. FYS
    ENGL 0760Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • The Claims of Fiction

    This course explores the interplay of tropes of strangeness, contamination, and crisis in a range of British, American, and African novels and short stories. We will ask why social misfits and outsiders somehow become such fascinating figures in fictional narratives. How do these fictions entice and equip readers to reflect on collective assumptions, values, and practices? Writers will likely include Baldwin, Brontë, Condé, Conrad, Faulkner, Greene, Ishiguro, Lessing, Morrison, Naipaul, Salih. Limited to 20 first-year students. DPLL FYS
    ENGL 0760R S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Lifewriting

    We explore writing's various forms—memoir, diary, essay, graphic narrative, film, and autobiography—while crafting personal narrative. Students read sample texts, view films, and keep an electronic diary. Projects include a memoir, personal critical essay, and final autobiography, as well as shorter assignments.This is a writing workshop, so students read & critique each others work. Individual conferences with the instructor also provide feedback. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Deboer-Langworthy
  • Sportswriting

    This course introduces students to the practice of sportswriting, including writing sports news, features, and columns. Readings will include works by Rick Reilly, Bill Simmons, Frank Deford, Karen Russell, Allison Glock, Tom Wolfe, Hunter S. Thompson, W.C. Heinz, and others. Students will develop skills in analyzing, researching, writing, revising, and workshopping in the genre. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • The Micro Essay

    The Micro Essay is a course that focuses on short, diverse essays that play with style and content. In the class we will focus on close sentence work and drill-based assignments, as well as aggressive readings of experimental and traditional essays. Enrollment limited to 17. Writing sample required. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1050F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
  • The Literary Scholar

    Why does literature need critical study? And does critical study inevitably undermine the pleasures of reading? To address those questions, we will examine the histories of literary criticism (Wimsatt, Brooks, et alii), literary theory (Saussure, Foucault, Derrida, et alii), and English literature (from Beowulf to Philip Larkin); we will examine literary texts through reader response theory, stylistics, literary linguistics, rhetorical theory, and philology. Writing in this seminar will range from reforming conventional literary critical discourse to experimenting with nontraditional forms. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, or 0180. S/NC.
    ENGL 1140A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
  • The Public Intellectual

    This course offers advanced writers an opportunity to practice sophisticated, engaged critical writing in academic, personal, and civic modes. Emphasis will be on writing "public" essays (general audience essays that do intellectual work or academic essays that address public topics), ideally in fluid, "hybrid," audience-appropriate forms. Areas of investigation will include (but are not limited to) the review essay, the cultural analysis essay, literary documentary, and the extended persuasive/analytic essay. It will include some brief "touchstone" investigations into rhetorical theory, with the aim of helping to broaden our concepts of audience, analyze the constitutive and imaginative effects of language, increase the real-world effectiveness of our own language practices, and situate our writing within current political, cultural, aesthetic and intellectual debates. Students must have sophomore standing or higher in order to be admitted to the class. A writing sample will be administered on the first day of class. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, or 0180. Class list will be reduced to 12 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1140B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Advanced Feature Writing

    For the advanced writer. Nothing provides people with more pleasure than a "good read." This journalism seminar helps students develop the skills to spin feature stories that newspaper and magazine readers will stay with from beginning to end, both for print and on-line publications. Students will spend substantial time off-campus conducting in-depth interviews and sharpening their investigative reporting skills. The art of narrative storytelling will be emphasized. Prerequisite: ENGL0160 or published clips submitted before the first week of classes. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC
    ENGL 1160A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
  • Lyricism and Lucidity

    For the advanced writer. This course will explore two subsets of the personal essay that blur or cross boundary lines--the lyric essay and the photographic essay-- in both traditional and experimental formats. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, 0180, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Not open to first year students. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Tales of the Real World

    For the advanced writer, this section offers a chance to practice the pleasures and challenges of nonfiction story-telling in the forms of literary journalism, personal essay, and audio narrative. Inspirations include Gay Talese, James Baldwin, Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace, and This American Life. Intensive practice in researching, interviewing, revising, and audio editing. Writing sample required. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, 0180, 1050, 1140, 1160, 1180, or 1190. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
  • Travel Writing: Personal and Cultural Narratives

    For the advanced writer. Helps students build skills in the growing genre of travel writing, including techniques for reading, observing, interviewing, composing, and revising travel pieces. Students will read the best contemporary writing about national and international travel in order to develop their own writing in areas like narrative, setting, characters, and voice. The course will feature interactive discussions, instructor conferences, and workshops. Prerequisite: ENGL 0130, 0160, 0180, or any 1000-level nonfiction writing course. Class list will be reduced to 17 after writing samples are reviewed during the first week of classes. Preference will be given to English concentrators. Banner registrations after classes begin require instructor approval. S/NC.
    ENGL 1180R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
  • Literary Communities

    Students in this course will partner with literary organizations in Providence to support and create programming, research audience and outreach, and assess quality and impact; they may also design an event or program. Writing may include cultural reporting, documentation and analysis, and "tactical" writing like grant proposals and press releases, and a weekly practice of reflective writing. Pre-requisites: ENGL 0110, ENGL 0130, ENGL 0160, ENGL 0180, or ENGL 1050 or any advanced Non-Fiction course.
    ENGL 1190R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
  • Poetics of Narrative

    Narratives are everywhere, simply there, like life itself, Roland Barthes says; we structure our experiences with narratives that we either infer or create. We will read different literary genres to see how narratives work and what makes them poetic and read theoretical texts to understand narrative function and performance. We will write experimentally to experience how stories are constructed. Pre-requisites: ENGL 0110, ENGL 0130, ENGL 0160, ENGL 0180, or ENGL 1050 or any advanced Non-Fiction course.
    ENGL 1190S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
  • Independent Study in Nonfiction Writing

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward some work in progress by the student. Requires submission of a written proposal to a faculty supervisor. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1200 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Breton
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Deboer-Langworthy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Readey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S42
    Primary Instructor
    Taylor
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S48
    Primary Instructor
    Stewart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S53
    Primary Instructor
    Schapira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1200 S59
    Primary Instructor
    Ward
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

    Middle English narratives by Geoffrey Chaucer's band of fictional pilgrims, read in their 14th-century historical and literary contexts. Prior knowledge of Middle English not required. Not open to first-year students.
    ENGL 1310V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
  • Women's Voices in Medieval Literature

    This course explores literary works from the early medieval period, both literature by women and literature that represents women’s voices and desires. Traditions examined will include the Old and Middle English, Norse, Welsh, and Irish. The course provides insight into the construction of premodern sexualities as well as into the cultural and social histories of multiple national traditions.
    ENGL 1361D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Kahn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S54
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1380 S58
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Melville, Conrad, and the Sea

    This class reads a number of the major works of Melville and Conrad in order to ask a number of questions crucial to understanding modern narrative: the relationship between realism and the romance (the sea being both the setting for adventure and a place of work); how, why, and by whom stories are told and passed on (the sea being both the place where ‘tall tales’ are told and where they are set); the role of the eye-witness (how do you prove you saw what no else has seen). Texts include "Moby Dick," "Billy Budd," "Lord Jim," and "Heart of Darkness."
    ENGL 1511Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Victorian Inequality

    From “Dickensian” workhouses to shady financiers, Victorian literature has provided touchstones for discussions of inequality today. This course will investigate how writers responded to the experience of inequality in Victorian Britain. Considering multiple axes of inequality, we will explore topics such as poverty and class conflict, social mobility, urbanization, gender, education, Empire, and labor.
    ENGL 1511T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hunt
  • Melville, Poe, and American Modernity

    The class will be guided by the premise that the writings of Poe and Melville reflect mid-19th century modernity.To support this claim we will look into their experimentation with narrative structure and ask whether the absence of clearly delineated characters in their stories is related to the emergence of urban crowds, practices of dehumanization employed in New York and Philadelphia prisons and hospitals.
    ENGL 1511U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Arsic
  • Jane Austen and George Eliot

    A survey of the major novels of Austen and Eliot. Readings will also include contemporary reviews and responses, letters, and Eliot's critical prose, as well as literary theory and criticism addressing questions such as novelistic form, realism and narrativity, the problem of the subject, the politics of aesthetics, and the changing status of the woman writer in the 19th century. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors and juniors. Instructor permission required. LILE
    ENGL 1560A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
  • Getting Emotional: Passionate Theories

    This course examines connections between emotion, feeling, and affect in several key texts from 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century literatures. We will ask how and why affect becomes a central concept for writers and thinkers in the Enlightenment, and chart the ways in which affect productively opens up onto contemporary theorizations of identity, gender, sexuality, and race. Possible authors include: Wordsworth, Austen, Blake, Equiano, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Wilde, Pater, Kant, Melville, Hofmansthal, Hume. Films by Todd Haynes, McQueen, Campion, Frampton. Theoretical readings by Berlant, Ellison, Terada, Deleuze, Stewart. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. LILE
    ENGL 1560W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
  • Touring the Empire: Travel Literature and the Idea of America

    Touring the Empire examines travel literature about America from the Revolutionary era up to the post-bellum period. Our primary concern will be to understand how the writings of tourists and travelers both contributed to and subverted the nineteenth century's myth of American exceptionalism. To this end, we will consider a variety of journals and travelogues, along with the autobiographies of former slaves, visual arts from the New York School, and journalism pertaining to the American south. Students should expect to gain an understanding of the rhetoric surrounding those uniquely American locales and institutions and the particular social formations that they enable.
    ENGL 1561R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Clytus
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1580 S56
    Primary Instructor
    Clytus
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • American Poetry II: Modernism

    Study of modernist American poetry. Readings include Pound, Eliot, Stevens, Williams, H.D., Moore, Hughes, and others.
    ENGL 1711A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
  • The Modernist Henry James

    How does consciousness know the world? By dramatizing the processes of knowing, Henry James transformed the novel and led the way from realism to modernism. In addition to exploring his fascination with consciousness and its implications for the art of the novel, this course will ask about the moral implications of his insistence on life’s ambiguities.
    ENGL 1711C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
  • Reading New York

    Explores narratives of New York City in a variety of genres, from the early 20th century to the present. Topics to be addressed include immigration, mobility, cosmopolitanism and the neighborhood, downtown, cruising, gentrification, 9/11. Work may include work by John Dos Passos, Nella Larsen, E.B. White, Jane Jacobs, Frank O’Hara, Patti Smith, Nan Goldin, Ernesto Quinones, Jonathan Safran Foer.
    ENGL 1711D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • African American Literature after 1965

    This course examines major authors and currents in African American literature from 1965 through the present. We will position these writings in relation to critical literary and historical developments that include Black Power nationalism, feminism, diaspora studies, and the debates about “post-racial” America. In doing so we will also be attentive to this period as a crucial phase in the development of an African American critical tradition. Authors include Toni Morrison, Angela Davis, Amiri Baraka, Colson Whitehead, and John Wideman. DPLL
    ENGL 1711E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
  • Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

    We will read novels, essays, diaries, and letters by Woolf in order to ask how and why Virginia Woolf haunts our culture and to consider her status as a cultural icon. The seminar will explore her work in the contexts of history, modernism, and literary influences, and it will examine the dimensions of Woolf's afterlife--a posthumous dynamic that shapes issues in art, politics, and gender. Enrollment limited to 20 seniors and juniors. LILE
    ENGL 1760E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
  • Yeats, Pound, Eliot

    Readings in the poetry and selected prose of Yeats, Pound, and Eliot. Enrollment limited to 20. LILE
    ENGL 1761P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
  • The Korean War in Color

    We examine US and South Korean representations of the Korean War. We look at how this event was depicted in US films of the 1950s with a focus on how it occasioned a transformation of American understandings of race, both domestically and transnationally. We then look at how this event has been memorialized by contemporary American authors as well as in South Korean literature and film. Authors we read include: Susan Choi, Ha Jin, Chang-rae Lee, Toni Morrison, Jayne Anne Phillips and Hwang Sok-Yong. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first-year students. DPLL LILE WRIT
    ENGL 1761V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
  • Image, Music, Text

    This course examines a number of novels and short stories alongside their various cinematic, theatrical, or musical adaptations in order to ask what a medium is and what distinctive formal features might define literature, cinema, theater, and music. Writers will include Melville, Conrad, Maupassant, Mann, and Cortazar; filmmakers will include Hitchcock, Antonioni, Godard, Visconti, and Coppola; critics will include Barthes, Deleuze, and Ranciere. Limited to 20 junior and senior concentrators in English, Comparative Literature, MCM, Hispanic Studies, Italian Studies, French Studies, German Studies, Literary Arts.
    ENGL 1762C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
  • Undergraduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Tutorial instruction oriented toward a literary research topic. Section numbers vary by instructor. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 1780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 1780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Literature and Politics

    Literature as a changing historical formation that often represents and is always shaped by the practices of organizing, asserting, and controlling power in society. Sustained focus on writings by Raymond Williams, Leon Trotsky, Michel Foucault, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, and Terry Eagleton, and on literary texts read from the perspectives of these six theorists (possibly Shakespeare, Milton, Marvell, Swift, Dickens, Gaskell, the Brontës, Victor Serge, Anna Akhmatova). Enrollment limited to 20. LILE WRIT
    ENGL 1900D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
  • The Postcolonial and the Postmodern

    Explores the contexts and conceptual implications of theories of postmodernism and postcolonialism. Particular attention to intersections and disjunctions between both concepts as attempts to grapple with the challenges of modernity from the vantage point of the late-20th century. Course will end with two novels that address related issues with the tools of fictional narrative: Coetzee's Foe and Rushdie's Midnight's Children. Readings include: Butler, Hall, Jameson, Laclau, Lyotard, Spivak. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 20.
    ENGL 1900T S01
    Primary Instructor
    George
  • Senior Honors Thesis in English

    Independent research and writing under the direction of a faculty member. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor in English. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in English. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • Senior Honors Thesis in Nonfiction Writing

    Independent research and writing under the direction of the student’s Nonfiction Writing honors supervisor. Permission should be obtained from the Honors Advisor for Nonfiction Writing. Open to senior English concentrators pursuing Honors in Nonfiction Writing. Instructor permission required.
    ENGL 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Imbriglio
  • Reading Things: Early Modern Material Culture

    Armor, books, china, clocks, coral, fans, feathers, fustian, gloves, handkerchiefs, lenses, miniatures, pearls, sugar, starch, tobacco are a few of the things to be found in the poetry, drama and prose of early modern England. This seminar will, in Walter Benjamin’s formulation, “attempt to elucidate things through research into their properties and relations” in order to explore their histories—artisanal, colonial, ideological, pre-industrial, as they are traced in imaginative writing of the period. Texts to include works by Behn, Donne, Jonson, Sidney, and Shakespeare.
    ENGL 2360W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Newman
  • Graduate Independent Study in Medieval and Early Modern Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2380 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Bryan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Foley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Kahn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2380 S57
    Primary Instructor
    Kuzner
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Writing the Ruins of Empire: Romantic Cultural Property

    British literary responses to the shifting significance and value status of ancient artifacts and works of art in the period of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars. Ruins as "cultural property," "cultural capital," and "aesthetic object"--then and now. Effects of colonial expansion and imperialist rivalry on collecting, connoisseurship, the advent of public museums, the marketing of antiquities, the marketing of literature. Primary readings in Gibbon, Volney, Byron, P.B. Shelley, Mary Shelley, Anna Barbauld, Felicia Hemans, Hazlitt, Keats.
    ENGL 2560Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
  • Nature and Law in American Literature

    This course will explore how American authors registered the transformation of natural history into the sciences of life. It will pay special attention to how new sciences of life influenced the legal and political practices that constitute our understanding of personhood. It will explore how sciences and emerging experimental medicine competed with discourses of the supernatural in deciding who has the right to live and die.
    ENGL 2561L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Arsic
  • Graduate Independent Study in the Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2580 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Egan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Khalip
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Gould
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Keach
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S30
    Primary Instructor
    McLaughlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Rabb
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S49
    Primary Instructor
    Redfield
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2580 S55
    Primary Instructor
    Anderson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Temporalities

    Centered on modernism and the early 20th century, this course will investigate the varied models of time pulsing through literary and theoretical texts, and consider a range of issues, including memory and forgetting, historical progress and decay, utopian futurity, and queer temporalities. Readings include work by Freud, Bergson, Nietzsche, Benjamin, Joyce, Woolf, Barnes, Stein, Proust.
    ENGL 2761B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
  • The Neoliberal Imagination

    An examination of the rise and flowering of neoliberalism as an aesthetic and ideological formation. We will deploy readings of a variety of aesthetic fields (postmodern novel, conceptual art, new Hollywood, rise of punk) to chart the relations among disparate disciplinary confrontations with problem of contingent value--poststructuralism, EMH-economics, postmarxism, new historicism, third wave feminism, queer studies. Theorists to be considered: Rawls, Habermas, Irigaray, Derrida, Laclau, Lyotard, Jameson, Spivak, and Butler; authors to be considered: Mailer, Morrison, Gaddis, Dick, LeGuin, Acker, Delillo, and Ashbery. We will carefully explore the implications (theoretical, methodological, institutional) of thinking of ideological formations in aesthetic terms.
    ENGL 2761D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
  • Graduate Independent Study in Modern and Contemporary Literatures

    Section numbers vary by instructor. May be repeated for credit. Instructor's permission required.
    ENGL 2780 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Armstrong
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Bewes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Blasing
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Burrows
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S20
    Primary Instructor
    George
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Katz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Kim
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Murray
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Nabers
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Reichman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Rooney
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S41
    Primary Instructor
    Stanley
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    ENGL 2780 S52
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Perversions: Hitchcock, Kubrick, Lynch

    A seminar on selected films by three great auteurs of the cinema of the perverse: Hitchcock ("Rear Window," "Vertigo," "The Birds"); Kubrick ("Dr. Strangelove," "A Clockwork Orange," "The Shining"); and Lynch ("Blue Velvet," "Wild at Heart," "Inland Empire"). Special attention to their ways with genre: detective film, thriller, horror, the sex film (on that account we'll also consider Mitchell's "Shortbus"), and road movie. Limited to graduate students in English, MCM, Comparative Literature, American Studies.
    ENGL 2900W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rambuss
  • Postcolonial Theory

    In this introduction to postcolonial theory we will consider key Western sources (Hegel, Marx, Lacan, Levi Strauss, Emmanuel Levinas); anticolonial manifestos (Gandhi, Fanon, Césaire, Memmi); political and ethical practices (civil disobedience, armed struggle, friendship). In addition to canonical critics (Said, Bhabha, Spivak), the course will review new interests in the field (transnationalism, non-western imperialisms, the environmental turn).
    ENGL 2900X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gandhi
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    ENGL 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    ENGL 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Courses of Interest to Students Concentrating in English

    These courses, offered in other departments, are cross listed with the English Department and do not require advisor approval to count toward the concentration for English concentrators. Please refer to the primary department for registration details.

    Cogut Center for Humanities
    HMAN 2970N The Humanist Social Sciences and Positivist Humanities
    French Studies
    FREN 2630A Theories of Decolonization
    Modern Culture and Media
    MCM 2110K Post-Reading
    ENGL XLIST 0