Concentration

CONCENTRATING IN ENGLISH

(Class of 2016 and beyond)

This year we are introducing a new model for the English concentration.

Concentrators of the class of 2016 who recently declared may, with the consent of their advisors, adapt to the new model as noted below in the Concentration Requirements.

Students graduating in 2015 will follow the earlier model.

Students declaring new concentrations this year will follow the new model as noted below.

Some courses will be renumbered following in academic year 2015-16.

THE CONCENTRATION

We study how literature works, how we understand it, and how we write about it. We examine closely matters of language, form, genre, and critical method. We invite you to new practices of reading and writing that promote the understanding of literatures and cultures in English through history, criticism, and theory. We are committed to the understanding of literature from a transnational perspective, emphasizing the movement of texts and peoples across borders of nation, race, gender, and sexuality, now and in the past. And we encourage students to commit themselves to the creation of original knowledge in their reading and writing.

In addition to the English concentration, we offer a concentration track in the practice of Nonfiction Writing. The concentration in English and the English/Nonfiction track follows the same core requirements, and students in the English concentration may choose Nonfiction Writing courses as electives. We invite applications from qualified juniors to the honors programs in both English and Nonfiction. Concentration plans must be approved by a concentration advisor.

To declare the new concentration, students must fill out an online concentration form via ASK (Advising Sidekick) and select “English—NEW”.

REQUIREMENTS

10 COURSES TOTAL:

  • ONE “HOW LITERATURE MATTERS” course
    Courses under this heading will be offered for the first time in the academic year 2015-16 as ENGL0100. Until then, concentrators may consult their advisors about substituting a course. See the list of “How Literature Matters” courses for academic years 2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15.
  • ONE COURSE BEFORE 1700
  • ONE COURSE AFTER 1700
  • ONE course in “LITERATURE ACROSS BORDERS”
    For these courses, see lists for academic years 2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15
  • ONE THEORY COURSE
  • FIVE ELECTIVES

Each course may fulfill ONE requirement.

Five of the ten courses at the 1000-level.

With advisor approval, two of the ten required courses may be taken in departments other than English.  As many as two courses dealing primarily with the practice of writing, except ENGL0110, may be counted as electives. One ENGL 0200 may be counted toward the ten required courses as an elective. All substitutions and/or exceptions must be approved by the concentration advisor in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. A substitution or exception is not approved until specified by a notation in ASK or on file in the English department.

ENGLISH/NONFICTION WRITING TRACK

10 COURSES

  • SAME REQUIREMENTS AS ABOVE
  • THREE 1000-LEVEL NONFICTION WRITING CLASSES must be among the five electives. ONLY ONE of the three may be ENGL1050.

HONORS IN ENGLISH

Requirements are the same as those for the standard concentration, with the following additions:

Honors candidates must complete at least three upper-level seminars or comparable small courses and complete ENGL 1991 and ENGL 1992, the honors thesis seminar taken in the senior year.

Honors candidates must earn more A's than B's in courses taken as part of the English concentration. Applicants for Honors must have two letters of recommendation submitted to the Honors Advisor, a writing sample, and a one‐page description of their proposed topic signed by the faculty member who has agreed to serve as the director of their thesis.

HONORS/NONFICTION TRACK 

Requirements are the same as those for the Nonfiction Writing Track, with the following additions:

Students must have completed either one intermediate (ENGL1050) and one advanced (ENGL1140, 1160, 1180, or 1190) writing course, or two advanced writing courses by the end of their sixth semester.

Honors candidates must successfully complete ENGL 1993 and ENGL 1994, the honors thesis seminar taken in the senior year.

Honors candidates must earn more A’s than B’s in courses taken as part of the English concentration.

Applicants for Honors in Nonfiction Writing must have three letters of recommendation submitted to the Nonfiction Honors Advisor, a writing sample, and a one-page description of their proposed topic signed by the faculty member who has agreed to serve as the director of the thesis.