Earlier Model

Requirements apply to previously declared concentrations only.

Beginning in fall 2013, various rubrics were renumbered.  Please consult the course numbering table.

About the English Concentration

Through the study of literature in English, concentrators develop skills in critical reading, thinking, and writing in preparation for a wide range of professions and careers including teaching, writing, publishing, media, medicine, law, and business.  The concentration requirements aim to provide students with a coherent sense of the history of English literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the present.  English concentrators have considerable latitude to choose the specific courses that will meet the requirements and we expect these choices to be informed by consistent consultation with a faculty advisor.  Writing skills are an especially important focus of the English concentration.  Through a variety of exercises from the short analytical essay to the longer research paper English concentrators are given a range of opportunities to sharpen their writing. 

We encourage any students interested in the concentration to take a course from the introductory sequence, ENGL0300/0500/0700 (formerly ENGL0210/0410/0610). Our concentration advisors are happy to speak with prospective concentrators as are all faculty in our department.

Concentration programs must be approved by a concentration advisor. To declare a concentration, students must fill out an online Concentration form via ASK (Advising Sidekick).   

Concentration Requirements

(10 courses* at the level of 0300, formerly 0210, or above)

  1. TWO courses in Area I: Medieval and Early Modern Literatures
  2. TWO courses in Area II: Enlightenment and the Rise of National Literatures
  3. TWO courses in Area III: Modern and Contemporary Literatures
  4. One theory course.
  5. Three electives.**

*Five courses must be 1000-level courses.

*With advisor approval, two of the ten required courses may be taken in departments other than English.

**As many as two 1000-level courses dealing primarily with the practice of writing, rather than the interpretation of literature, may be counted as electives.

All substitutions and/or exceptions must be approved by the concentration advisor in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. A substitution or exception is not approved until specified in writing in the student’s concentration file housed in the English Department.

Nonfiction Writing Track

(11 courses at the level of 0300, formerly 0210, or above)

The English concentration also includes a Nonfiction Writing Track.  The requirements are the same as 1 through 4 above, in addition to ONE English literature course emphasizing the genre of nonfiction writing, and THREE 1000-level Nonfiction Writing courses (only one of which may be ENGL1050) for a total of eleven courses.

Honors in English

 Requirements are the same as those for the regular concentration, with the following additions:
Honors candidates must complete at least three upper-level seminars or comparable small courses and complete ENGL 1991 and ENGL 1992. Honors candidates must also earn more A's than B's in courses taken as part of the English concentration.

Applicants for Honors must have two letters of recommendation submitted to the Honors Advisor, a writing sample, and a one-page description of their proposed topic signed by the faculty member who has agreed to serve as the director of their thesis.

Honors in Nonfiction Writing

Requirements are the same as those for the Nonfiction Writing Track. Eligible Honors applicants must have completed three upper-level seminars, two of which must be nonfiction writing seminars. Honors candidates must successfully complete ENGL 1993 and ENGL 1994.  Honors candidates must also earn more A’s than B’s in courses taken as part of the English concentration. 

Applicants for Honors in Nonfiction Writing must have THREE letters of recommendation submitted to the Nonfiction Honors Advisor, a writing sample, and a one-page description of their proposed topic signed by the faculty member who has agreed to serve as the director of the thesis.