Courses for Spring 2014

  • The Philosophers' Stone: Alchemy From Antiquity to Harry Potter

    As a set of ideas and practices, alchemy has a long, rich history in China, Roman Egypt, the Middle East, Europe, and the U.S.. From late antiquity to the present, alchemists have transformed matter in order to understand nature, make things (including elixirs and gold), and explore connections between the natural and the supernatural. The history of alchemy offers a point of entry into science, magic, medicine, gender, religion, and cultural images of the sage, fool, and fraud. HIST 0150 courses introduce students to methods of historical analysis, interpretation, and argument. This class presumes no previous history courses. E
    HIST 0150B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
  • Modern American History: New and Different Perspectives

    Rather than a survey, this course uses specific episodes and events to reveal different modes of analysis. Examples of questions are: What do gender perspectives tell us about men on the frontier and women in dance halls? What is the importance of baseball to American culture? How do a historian and a lawyer differ in their analysis of a sensational crime case? How can we understand why the U.S. dropped two atomic bombs on Japan? How did scandals in television and popular music signal an end to American innocence? How has the Baby Boom generation altered American society? And more. M
    HIST 0520 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
  • When Leaders Lie: Machiavelli in International Context (ITAL 0981)

    Interested students must register for ITAL 0981 (CRN 25219).
  • Sport in American History

    This course covers the relationship of sports to aspects of American culture since 1900. Topics include gender, race, amateurism, professionalism, intercollegiate athletics, and sports heroes. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS M
    HIST 0970S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
  • Becoming French: Minorities and the Challenges of Integration in the French Republic

    Recent controversies around Muslim integration, including debates around the headscarf and uprisings in the working class suburbs of large French cities, point to difficulties France has faced in integrating its minority populations. This course will explore the encounter between France and its immigrant, religious, and racial minorities from the Revolution to contemporary times. By comparing paths of integration and debates around minority inclusion, we will consider how minorities negotiated their identities as they struggled to internalize France’s cultural and historical legacy. We will also addresses political and historiographical debates over the relationship between political citizenship and religious/cultural identity. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students and sophomores. M
    HIST 0980B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mandel
  • History of Greece: From Alexander the Great to the Roman Conquest

    Covers the decline of Athens as the center of classical civilization; the conquests of Alexander the Great; the culture of the Greek elite and, to the extent that it's recoverable, of the indigenous populations of the Hellenistic world; and Greek contributions to what we call Western Civilization. P
    HIST 1000A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
  • European Intellectual History: Discovering the Modern

    A lecture course, primarily for juniors and seniors, that focuses on salient philosophic, artistic, and ideological currents of 19th-century Europe. Beginning with the crisis of political and cultural legitimacy posed by the French Revolution, it concludes with the consolidation of bourgeois culture in the 1860s and 1870s and the two great scientific systematizers of these decades: Darwin and Marx. M
    HIST 1210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • British History, 1660-1800

    A survey of British history from the restoration of monarchy to the Wilkes affair and the loss of the American colonies. In addition to political developments such as the Glorious Revolution and the rise of party, examines political ideology (including the great political theorist, John Locke) and various themes in social history (such as crime, popular protest, the sexual revolution, and the experiences of women). P
    HIST 1290 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
  • Nineteenth-Century Cities: Paris, London, Chicago

    What does it mean to be a reformer? In the nineteenth century, governments successfully regulated their relationship to nature, including water and air pollution. Scientists reformed police by measuring identities/classifying different kinds of people. Utopian movements proposed salvaging slums through refinement of knowledge. In the midst of these science-led experiments the limits of pollution reform gave way to Anthropocene that era of proliferating greenhouse gases. In midst of democratic reform riot and revolution erupted over each of these capitals multiple times during the century. What went wrong and how can we learn from these failures of governance? M
    HIST 1301 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
  • War and Peace in Modern Europe

    This course explores the relationship between war, culture, and society in modern Europe. The two world wars changed the political, social, and cultural landscape of Europe, and by extension, of the rest of the world, not least the United States. We will not delve into the military history of these vast conflicts; instead, we will examine how the experience of total war remolded European understanding and practices of memory and commemoration, culture and representation, humanity and civilization, utopia and revolution, catastrophe and identity. We will read influential scholarly texts and literary works, and watch important contemporary films.M
    HIST 1330 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
  • Empire and Nation: Violence and Cosmopolitanism in the Eastern Mediterranean, 1856-1922

    With Greece in crisis and the Middle East experiencing an "Arab Spring" the Eastern Mediterranean is again hitting the headlines. This course offers a historical perspective to current developments by examining the social, political and cultural transformations between the mid-19th century and the 1922 Greco-Turkish exchange of populations while questioning the current image of the Eastern Mediterranean as a model of cosmopolitan conviviality and an archetype of unbridled violence. Topics include state-building in Greece, the modernization of the Ottoman Empire, colonialism in Egypt, nationalism and coexistence, the Balkan wars and population movements, and, finally, contemporary nostalgias for fin-de-siècle Mediterranean.
    HIST 1361 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chronakis
  • The Making of the Modern Middle East, 1750 to the Present

    From North Africa to Afghanistan, and Turkey to the Arabian peninsula, the goal of this course is to provide students with a robust background in modern Middle Eastern history, broadly defined. We begin in the long nineteenth century, an era of intense social and economic transformation that led to the collapse of the Ottoman empire and emergence of a new state system, primarily under British and French colonial rule. We then explore forces shaping the contemporary region, including nationalism, oil, regional conflicts and the Cold War, Islamism and mass politics, and military interventions by the US and other world powers. M
    HIST 1455 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
  • Cultural History of the Netherlands in a Golden Age and a Global Age

    Between 1580 and 1690 two nations emerged in Europe from what had been one unified region. To the north, the Dutch Republic gained its independence from Spain and developed as a bastion of liberty, ideas in ferment, visuals arts, Calvinist faith, science, technology, global economic reach. To the south, the "loyal" Netherlands, now Belgium, returned to the Spanish and Catholic fold, but sustained its leading position in the arts, competed in global trade, and negotiated a new compromise of government. In this course we present an interdisciplinary, comparative view of the "two" Netherlands and their legacy in the world. M
    HIST 1493 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • War and Medicine since the Renaissance

    Since the Renaissance, warfare has mainly been a mass activity organized by states, with the ability to cause mass harm growing by leaps and bounds. At the same time, states have developed methods to care for their armed forces, and sometimes the civilians entangled in their military operations. This course will deal briefly with the history of warfare, and mainly with the ways in which states, citizens, and interested parties have attempted to ameliorate the bodily effects of warfare, from the Renaissance to the late 20th century. E
    HIST 1496 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • China Pop: The Social History of Chinese Popular Culture

    An exploration of how the artifacts of visual, material, aural and ritual culture illuminate the practices and beliefs of people at various levels of Chinese society from the late imperial period to the present. Topics include arrangements of space and time, popular entertainment, religion and performance, the growth of mass media, and the relationship of cultural forms to politics, protest and global forces. In addition to lectures, discussions and papers, students will have the opportunity to create research presentations using multiple media formats. E
    HIST 1503 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
  • Samurai and Merchants, Prostitutes and Priests: Japanese Urban Culture in the Early Modern Period

    Examines the cultural traditions of the urban samurai, the wealthy merchant, and the plebian artisan that emerged in the great metropolises of Edo, Osaka, and Kyoto during the early modern period. Focuses on the efforts of the government to mold certain kinds of cultural development for its own purposes and the efforts of various social groups to redirect those efforts to suit their desires and self-interest. P
    HIST 1540 S01
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
  • Modern Latin America I

    This course offers an introduction to the history of Latin America, beginning with the late colonial period and running through the close of the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on political, social, and cultural history; less attention is paid to diplomatic and economic history. M
    HIST 1630 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Green
  • The Shot Heard 'Round the World: The History of Revolutionary America

    For those who lived through it, the American Revolution was a very personal experience. The struggle for American liberties pitted neighbors against neighbors, tore local communities apart, destroyed families, ruined livelihoods and ended lives. But the Revolution was also a global phenomenon. Its ideological origins lay in ancient Greece and Rome. Its economic causes stretched around the globe. Its ideals and values have inspired generations. Only by studying the complexity of the Revolution, and by placing the local experiences of newly-minted "Americans" within the global backdrop of their times, can this formative stage of United States history be fully understood. P
    HIST 1701 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Roberts
  • U.S. Cultural History from Revolution to Reconstruction

    What does it mean to survey a country's history? In this course, it means setting out in several different directions in order to determine the form, extent, and situation of the United States from the 1750s to the 1870s. It means looking carefully at the nation's past through its cultural productions (ideas, beliefs, and customs expressed in print, material, and visual forms). And it means paying close attention to the details. Each week, students will examine one object, text, or idea in order to track broader developments in American history during this time period. M
    HIST 1770 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nelson
  • Ideas in the U.S. Since 1865

    This course treats aspects of both the intellectual and cultural history of the United States since the Civil War. Efforts will be made not only to comprehend the ideas of major thinkers, but also trends in the general culture that entail changes and continuities in values, attitudes, and behaviors. It will explore how historical changes have inspired ideas, and how those ideas have helped to shape history. Major themes include Darwinism, Victorianism, pragmatism, progressivism, pluralism, modernity, corporate capitalism, environmentalism, the beats, and the Sixties. M
    HIST 1781 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jundt
  • Science in the Marketplace

    We will explore the longstanding relationship between science and commerce from the 17th century to our own asking when the modern notion of science as a disinterested pursuit of objective truth took root. We will also explore how knowledge of the natural world has been shaped by personal, financial, and other kinds of self-interest in a number of diverse contexts ranging from Galileo’s invention of the telescope in Renaissance Italy to to the patenting of genetically engineered organisms in today's world, paying special attention to the diverse mechanisms that have been devised to guard against fraud and disinformation. E
    HIST 1783 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
  • Religion, Politics, and Culture in America, 1865 - Present

    Religion has played an undeniable role in the contemporary American cultural landscape. This course lends some perspective on the present by investigating the various and, at times, surprising role religion has played in history in the shaping of American culture from 1865 to the present. M
    HIST 1801 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
  • American Empire Since 1890

    This survey of twentieth-century US foreign relations will focus on the interplay between the rise of the United States as a superpower and American culture and society. Topics include: ideology and U.S. foreign policy, imperialism and American political culture, U.S. social movements and international affairs, and the relationship between U.S. power abroad and domestic race, gender and class arrangements. M
    HIST 1900 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
  • History of American School Reform (EDUC 1200)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 1200 (CRN 24064).
  • Black Freedom Struggle Since 1945 (AFRI 1090)

    Interested students must register for AFRI 1090 (CRN 24551).
  • American Higher Education in Historical Context (EDUC 1730)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 1730 (CRN 24067).
  • Antisemitism and Islamophobia (JUDS 1710)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 1710 (CRN 24868).
  • Kabbalah: Jews, Mysticism, and Magic (JUDS 1740)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 1740 (CRN 25062).
  • The First Globalization: The Portuguese in Africa, Asia, and the Americas

    This class surveys history of Portuguese empire in Asia, Africa, and Brazil from fifteenth to early nineteenth centuries. Portugal pioneered the European expansion in the fourteenth century, laying the groundwork for several historical phenomena that defined modernity, such as the formation of colonial coastal enclaves in Africa and Asia, the colonization of the Americas, and the beginning of large-scale trade across the Atlantic and Indian oceans. The class analyzes the economic, religious and technological factors behind Portugal's pioneering role in European expansion. We focus on patterns of socio-cultural and religious interaction between Portuguese and native peoples in Asia, Africa, Brazil. P
    HIST 1951 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
  • 17th Century Portuguese World (POBS 1600S)

    Interested students must register for POBS 1600S (CRN 25243).
  • The Cold War and Environmentalism

    Beginning with the psychic and environmental dislocations wrought by the advent of the Bomb, this seminar will move forward in time to trace the nation's growing environmental awareness and concern as we seek to understand what underlies contemporary environmentalism. In so doing we will look not only at classic texts like Aldo Leopold's Sand County Almanac and Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, but many complicating traditional notions of the origins and conduct of the modern environmental movement.
    HIST 1970Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jundt
  • Politics and Culture Under The Brazilian Military Dictatorship, 1964-1985

    This course will focus on the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that took place in Brazil during the military dictatorship that ruled the country from 1964-85. We will examine why the generals took power, the role of the U.S. government in backing the new regime, cultural transformations during this period, and the process that led to re-democratization. M
    HIST 1972R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Green
  • Korea: North and South

    This course offers a systematic investigation of the political, economic, and social histories of Korea, North and South, from the inception of the two governments following liberation from Japanese occupation in 1945 to the present day. Enrollment limited to 20. M
    HIST 1973J S01
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
  • City as Modernity:Popular Culture, Mass Consumption, Urban Entertainment in Nineteenth-Century Paris

    Modernity as a distinct kind of cultural experience was first articulated in the Paris of the 1850s. The seminar will explore the meaning of this concept by looking at the theories of Walter Benjamin, as well as historical examples of popular urban culture such as the mass circulation newspaper, the department store, the museum, the café concert and the early cinema. Enrollment limited to 20. M
    HIST 1973P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • The English Revolution

    Looks at the origins and nature of the English Civil War and Republican experiment in government (1642-1660) through a close examination of primary source materials. Considers not only the constitutional conflict between the crown and parliament, but also the part played by those out-of-doors in the revolutionary upheaval, the rise of popular radicalism, and the impact of events in Scotland and Ireland. P
    HIST 1973T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
  • Women in the Islamic Middle East

    This course focuses on women in the Middle East, from the seventh century emergence of Islam to the twentieth century rearticulation of women's "place" in the context of nation state formation and the struggle for new identities. We examine the status of women and the ways women were culturally crafted. In particular, we will discuss the contested nature of women's roles; the encounter between "Eastern" and "Western" societies; power, patronage, and seclusion; veils and voices; and the modes by which women’s lives were narrated (by themselves and others). Enrollment limited to 20. Instructor permission required. E
    HIST 1976M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
  • Popular Protest and Social Justice in China, Past and Present

    This course examines the role that Chinese cosmological and popular religious beliefs had, first, in the formation of concepts of social justice and, second, in shaping popular protest movements throughout Chinese history. The course begins with an exploration of early concepts of cosmic and social justice and an examination of how these concepts are expressed in selected pre-21st century popular uprisings; and then moves on to study a range of contemporary protest movements--against environmental degradation, government corruption, religious restrictions, and so forth--and their social and political significance for the future development of China. Enrollment limited to 20. E
    HIST 1976N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
  • Early Modern Globalization: Jewish Economic Activity, 1500-1800

    What can the experience of a minority group like the Jews teach us about the roots of globalization? What were the economic, political, and cultural conditions that allowed early modern Jewish merchants to create economic networks stretching from India to the New World? We will answer these questions by examining the connections and interactions between four major Jewish centers: Ottoman Jewry in the Eastern Mediterranean, the Port Jews of Amsterdam and London, Polish-Jewish estate managers in Ukraine, and the Court Jews of central Europe. We will see how European expansion exploited - and was exploited by - these Jewish entrepreneurs. Enrollment limited to 20 undergraduates. P
    HIST 1976R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
  • History of the Andes from the Inca Empire to Evo Morales

    Before the Spanish invaded in the 1530s, western South America was the scene of the largest state the New World had ever known, Tawantinsuyu, the Inca empire. During almost 300 years of colonial rule, the Andean provinces were shared by the "Republic of Spaniards" and the "Republic of Indians" - two separate societies, one dominating and exploiting the other. Today the region remains in many ways colonial, as Quechua- and Aymara-speaking villagers face a Spanish-speaking state, as well as an ever-more-integrated world market, the pressures of neoliberal reform from international banks, and the melting of the Andean glaciers. Enrollment limited to 20. E WRIT
    HIST 1976T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
  • Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World

    This seminar will explore the knowledge-production and military-financial infrastructures that maintain empires, and the means through which people have resisted or embraced empire. While some attention will be made to the 19th and early 20th century colonial context, the bulk of the course will focus on the Cold War liberal era to the neoliberal regime that continues today. Topics include: popular culture and ideology, Cold War university, area studies, international anti-war networks, transnational labor activism, the anti-colonial radical tradition, and the Arab Spring/Occupy Movements. Weekly readings; evaluation based on participation and analytical essays. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. M
    HIST 1977Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
  • Drifting Cities. Multiethnic Societies from Empire to Nation-State

    What happens to a multiethnic city when it passes from a dying empire to a nascent nation-state? This course focuses on Vienna and the Mediterranean ports of Trieste and Salonica from the late 19th century to the end of the Second World War and examines their transformation from cradles of Habsburg and Ottoman imperial modernity into laboratories of Austrian, Italian and Greek nationalism. Topics include: interethnic relations; the impact of WW1 and interwar nationalism; assimilation, antisemitism and state policies; urban transformations; the Holocaust and its memory; and nostalgic imaginings of these cities in current public discourse. Enrollment limited to 20. M
    HIST 1978A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chronakis
  • Palestine versus the Palestinians

    Who are the Palestinians? How and when did they become a “people”? What are the historical forces that led to the creation of Palestine, then its transformation into Israel? Underlying these questions is a tremendous tension between the historical evolution of Palestine and the Palestinians, as if one could exist only at the expense of the other. To explore this tension between identity and territory, students are introduced to recent scholarship that unsettles nationalist narratives and suggests alternative narratives. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first year students. M
    HIST 1978D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
  • History of Global Urban Epidemics

    Polio. Plague. Pox. This seminar will use historical, sociological, journalistic, epidemiological, documentary film, and literary sources to explore urban disease outbreaks and human responses from ancient to modern times. By examining cases such as plague in Florence and Hong Kong, yellow fever in Charleston and Veracruz, smallpox in Rio de Janeiro and Bombay, AIDS in New York and Kampala, and SARS in Toronto and Beijing, we will seek to understand the role of urban ecological factors in the emergence of disease, and the nature of social, scientific, and civic authority responses to urban epidemics. Enrollment limited to 20. M
    HIST 1978F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Parks
  • Science at the Crossroads: From Darwin to Quantum Physics

    This course will look closely at the dramatic developments that fundamentally challenged Western Science between 1859 and the advent of the Second World War in the 1930s. Its primary focus will be on a variety of texts written in an effort to understand and interpret the meanings of fundamentally new ideas including from the biological side--evolutionary theory, genetic theory, and eugenics; from the physical side relativity theory, and quantum mechanics. The class should be equally accessible to students whose primary interests lie in the sciences and those who are working in the humanities. Enrollment limited to 20. M
    HIST 1978G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
  • Culture and Power in Modern Iran

    "I went to the Persian Art Exhibit at 51st Street and Fifth Ave...The important thing is the realization that here is an art which has survived through 6,000 years of invasion, war, tyranny, prosperity and power." So wrote Eleanor Roosevelt in her newspaper column in June 1940. Throughout the history of modern Iran, its relations with the West have been mediated through a cultural lens. In turn, the struggle to define national culture within Iran itself has been deeply embedded in cultural production. This course examines the history of modern Iran through its art, cinema, literature, and cultural institutions. Enrollment limited to 20. M
    HIST 1978H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Balaghi
  • Enslaved: Indians and Africans in an Unfree Atlantic World

    This course examines the varieties of Indian and African enslavement in the Atlantic world, including North America, up through 1800. Reading widely in the recent literature in the field as well as in primary sources from the colonial period, we will ponder the origins, practices, meanings, and varieties of enslavement, along with critiques and points of resistance by enslaved peoples and Europeans. Special emphasis will be given to the lived nature of enslavement, and the activity of Indians and Africans to navigate and resist these harsh realities. A final project or paper is required, but there are no prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 20. P
    HIST 1978O S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
  • Utopias and Other Wastelands

    What factors are necessary for a social movement to grow? We'll look at international Progressive movement, appropriate technology, trade unions, and cooperatives, as examples of modern movements doomed in one nation, flourishing elsewhere. We'll interpret the conservative utopias of Ayn Rand, Milton Friedman, alongside the radical utopias of Theosophists. Looking into the alliances of professionals, experts, national legislators, capitalism and organs of world government, trying to understand alignments of power that caused some movements to flourish and others to falter, asking when individuals and collectives have the opportunity to change the world around them and how we measure their success. Enrollment limited to 20. M
    HIST 1978U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
  • Nature on Display

    This course explores how people have visualized nature in a variety of context and time periods from the 16th to the 21st century. We will examine the depiction of nature in extremely diverse places, genres, and media: everything from natural history encyclopedias, public dissections, habitat dioramas, to the circus, zoological garden, documentary film, and municipal park. As we do so, we will mine these encounters to explore our changing attitudes towards nature and the place we humans occupy in it. E
    HIST 1978W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
  • The American West

    Lone horsemen. Teepees gathered along riverbanks. Shootouts in dusty streets. Railroad tracks stretching out across the plains. These are common visions of the American West, and they convey many of the myths of America: the frontier spirit, the vanishing Indian, the American dream. This course will examine these myths and the cultural, political, and environmental realities that both informed and undermined them over the course of two hundred years. Readings will range widely across both space and time, moving with communities across deserts, national boundaries, mountain ranges, and plains as they come into various forms of contact with one another. Enrollment limited to 20. M
    HIST 1979B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nelson
  • Plague, War, Famine and Death: Crisis in Late-Medieval Europe

    This course explores the ways that people in fourteenth and fifteenth century Europe responded to the extreme hardships inflicted by famines, climate change, epidemics, wars, peasant rebellions, and religious upheaval. Covering topics ranging from evolving treatments for the plague to reactions to the Ottoman Turks’ capture of Constantinople in 1453, our discussions will help students to develop a deep understanding of a key period of transition within the history of Europe. Drawing on the lessons of the late Middle Ages, the course will provide background for understanding current events such as the Syrian Civil War and the Eurozone financial crisis. P
    HIST 1979C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Boss
  • Lincoln

    This seminar will explore the life of the most famous American who ever lived. It will use a wide variety of sources, including his own writings, and the journals of those who worked closely with him, particularly John Hay, a recent Brown graduate. The seminar will pay attention to the known external facts of Lincoln's life, but it will also attempt to shed light on his rich psychological interior. Finally, it will contemplate the complex role Lincoln occupies today, in the wake of the successful 2012 film. M
    HIST 1979G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Widmer
  • Undergraduate Reading Courses

    Guided reading on selected topics. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 1990 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S07
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S08
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S27
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Nelson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History Honors Workshop for Prospective Thesis Writers

    HIST 1992 and HIST 1993 students meet together as the History Honors Workshop, offered in two separate sections per week. Prospective honors students are encouraged to enroll in HIST 1992 during semesters 5 or 6. HIST 1992 offers a consideration of historical methodology and techniques of writing and research with the goal of preparing to write a senior thesis in history, allowing students to refine research skills, define a project, prepare a thesis prospectus, required for admission to honors. Students who complete honors may count HIST 1992 as a concentration requirement. Limited to juniors who qualify for the honors program. WRIT
    HIST 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    HIST 1992 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part I

    HIST 1992 and HIST 1993 students meet together as the History Honors Workshop, offered in two separate sections per week. All students admitted to the History Honors Program must enroll in HIST 1993 for two semesters of thesis research and writing. They may enroll in the course during semesters 6 and 7, or 7 and 8. Course work entails researching, organizing, writing a history honors thesis. Presentation of work and critique of peers' work required. Limited to seniors and juniors who have been admitted to History Honors Program. HIST 1993 is a mandatory S/NC course. See History Concentration Honors Requirements.
    HIST 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1993 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part II

    This is the second half of a year-long course, upon completion the grade will revert to HIST 1993. Prerequisite: HIST 1993.
    HIST 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    HIST 2890 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 2910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Weinstein
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Mandel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Castiglione
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Professionalization Seminar

    Required of all second year Ph.D. students; includes participation in Thursday Lecture Series. E
    HIST 2950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
  • Prospectus Development Seminar

    This required course open only to second-year students in the History Ph.D. program focuses on the development of a dissertation prospectus. The seminar will include considering the process of choosing a dissertation topic, selecting a dissertation committee, identifying viable dissertation projects, articulating a project in the form of a prospectus, and developing research grant proposals based on the prosectus. E
    HIST 2960 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
  • Rethinking the Civil Rights Movement

    This graduate course encourages a rethinking of the complex components, arguments and activities that have characterized what we have come to know as the Civil Rights Movement, concentrating primarily on African American agency, actions and politics, through careful reading of recent scholarship in the field. While knowledge of U.S. history is preferred, this course asks larger thematic questions about protest movements (the role of the state, relationships with and between oppressed groups and organizations, and periodization), that will interest non-Americanists also. Some of the topics covered include: gender, organizing and strategies, the local, global ramifications and interactions, organizational structures and politics, and the recent concept of the Long Civil Rights Movement. M
    HIST 2970C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
  • Borderlands: Violence and Coexistence

    Readings of theoretical and empirical studies in interstate and inter-ethnic relations in borderland regions throughout the world, with an emphasis on the modern period in East-Central. Open to graduate students only.
    HIST 2971L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
  • The Future of the European Past: History and Globalization

    A combined history/historiography seminar about the globalization of European history and the status and future of European historiography in the 21st century. This will include a practical/professional consideration of the status and future directions of European history in the the curriculum and structure of departments. Globalization is understood as a close analogue to provincialization in Dipesh Cahkrabarty's usage and thus also to figure in the legacy of such historical and theoretical phenomena as colonialism, post-colonialism, and imperialism.
    HIST 2981G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Steinberg
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    HIST 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep