Courses for Spring 2015

  • The Philosophers' Stone: Alchemy From Antiquity to Harry Potter

    Alchemy today conjures Harry Potter or Full Metal Alchemist, not the serious scholarly tradition that captivated Isaac Newton and Carl Jung. We will explore alchemy’s long history, examining how it has endured and adapted to different cultural, social, intellectual, economic, and religious contexts. What did alchemists do? How did they explain their art? And why has alchemy come to represent fraud and folly in some circles and wisdom in others? Students will answer these questions by conducting research in the Hay. HIST 0150 courses introduce students to methods of historical analysis, interpretation, and argument. Presumes no previous history courses. E
    HIST 0150B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
  • Refugees: A Twentieth-Century History

    Refugees are arguably the most important social, political and legal category of the twentieth century. This introductory lecture course locates the emergence of the figure of the refugee in histories of border-making, nation-state formation and political conflicts across the twentieth century to understand how displacement and humanitarianism came to be organized as international responses to forms of exclusion, war, disaster and inequality. M
    HIST 0150D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
  • Modern American History: New and Different Perspectives

    Rather than a survey, this course uses specific episodes and events to reveal different modes of analysis. Examples of questions are: What do gender perspectives tell us about men on the frontier and women in dance halls? What is the importance of baseball to American culture? How do a historian and a lawyer differ in their analysis of a sensational crime case? How can we understand why the U.S. dropped two atomic bombs on Japan? How did scandals in television and popular music signal an end to American innocence? How has the Baby Boom generation altered American society? And more. M
    HIST 0520 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
  • Brothers Betrayed: Jews and Poles from 1500 until Today (JUDS 0901)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 0901 (CRN 26145).
  • History of Intercollegiate Athletics (EDUC 0850)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 0850 (CRN 23938).
  • Social Welfare in the Ancient Greek City (CLAS 0310)

    Interested students must register for CLAS 0310 (CRN 25427).
  • Athens, Jerusalem, and Baghdad: Three Civilizations, One Tradition

    This FYS examines the core beliefs of early Greek, Jewish, Christian, and Islamic civilizations that form the basis of Western thought. Serving a similar ideological purpose in the pre-modern world as have political and economic theories for the modern world, religion and philosophy defined individual lives and collective identities. We focus on the manner of appropriation and modification of thought from one culture to another in order to appreciate that there is far more similarity than difference in belief systems among what are today viewed as separate, even contesting, cultures. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. Instructor permission required. FYS WRIT P
    HIST 0971J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
  • Culture Wars in American Schools

    This course examines "culture wars" in American public schools over the past century. It will explore how and why school curriculum has become an arena for cultural conflict and how those debates have changed over time. These debates clashes in schools over religion, values, politics, and educational aims raise important questions about majority and minority rights, the existence and meaning of a common national culture, and the role of schooling in a democratic nation. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students and sophomores. M
    HIST 0980C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Steffes
  • Welfare States and a History of Modern Life

    History of the American welfare state, from its origins in nineteenth-century industrial capitalism to contemporary debates about health care, in comparative perspective. Why did welfare states appear and what form did the U.S. version take? Considerations of social inequality, labor relations, race, gender, family policy, the social wage, and the relationship between markets and the state are all considered. Some comparison with European models. SOPH M
    HIST 0980J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Self
  • The Shaping of the Classical World: Greeks, Jews, and Romans

    Focuses on the ancient Greeks, Romans, and Jews, from 300 B.C.E. to 400 C.E. Covers primarily social, philosophical, and religious areas of contention and accommodation, ending with the late Antique, Christianity, and rabbinic Judaism. P
    HIST 1000B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
  • The Viking Age

    For two centuries, Viking marauders struck terror into hearts of European Christians. Feared as raiders, Norsemen were also traders and explorers who maintained a network of connections stretching from North America to Baghdad and who developed a complex civilization that was deeply concerned with power and its abuses, the role of law in society, and the corrosive power of violence. This class examines the tensions and transformations within Norse society between AD 750 and 1100 and how people living in the Viking world sought to devise solutions to the challenges that confronted them as their world expanded and changed. P
    HIST 1031 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
  • Crusaders and Cathedrals, Deviants and Dominance: Europe in the High Middle Ages

    Popes named Joan, Gothic cathedrals, and crusaders-all these were produced by rich world of the western European Middle Ages. The cultural, religious, and social history of this period are explored with special attention to the social construction of power, gender roles, and relations between Christians and non-Christians. WRIT P
    HIST 1040 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
  • The Roots of Modern Science

    This course explores the ways theories of physics, chemistry, biology and mathematics grew in relation to the natural, cultural and social worlds of the 18th and 19th centuries. There are no formal pre-requisites for the course, which is designed to be equally open and accessible to science and humanities students. WRIT M
    HIST 1190 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
  • European Intellectual History: Exploding the Modern

    The overarching theme of the course is the relationship between modernity and the primitive as manifested in major cultural, aesthetic and political movements in the 20th century. Films are an integral part of the course. WRIT M
    HIST 1230 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
  • Nineteenth-Century Cities: Paris, London, Chicago

    This course surveys the literature on the origins of visual information - architecture, entertainment, mapping, shopping, advertising, painting, and film - in the modern city. For each of these visual productions, both form and content are implicated in the political and social worlds of their original settings. Nineteenth-century issues of labor, gender, consumption, and governance played a a role in making the original spectacles. What messages they contained, who produced them, and who witnessed them were determined by contemporary hierarchies, political struggle, and technology. M
    HIST 1301 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
  • Modern France

    This course follows the history of France from the time of Louis XIV to the present, focusing on social and cultural trends, with particular emphasis on the boundaries of French national identity. It asks who belonged to the French nation at key moments in French history, including the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the Napoleonic era, industrialization, imperialism, and the two world wars, as well as the complex questions presently facing France. We will examine how inclusions and exclusions during these moments reveal larger themes within French history, such as those dealing with race, class, gender, immigration, and anti-Semitism, amongst others. M
    HIST 1340 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
  • German History, 1806-1945

    This course examines the development of German history from the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire to the end of World War II. During that time the German states went from being a sleepy backwater to being the conquerors of Europe, finally conquered themselves by the Allied Forces. Through lecture, readings, and discussion we will examine post-Napoleonic Germany, Prussia’s role in uniting Germany, the Wilhelmine Empire, the Weimar Republic, and finally National Socialism. The class will take into account politics, economics, war, and culture in painting a full picture of the development of a distinct German state and society.
    HIST 1371 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gentry
  • The Collapse of Socialism and the Rise of New Russia

    This course examines late Soviet socialism, the collapse of the USSR, and the emergence of the new Russia. The following themes are emphasized in lectures and readings: the major features of de-Stalinization; Soviet and Russian foreign policy during and after the Cold War; the domestic and international causes and consequences of the collapse of the Soviet Union; and the emergence of a new Russian government and national identity during the 1990s and early 2000s. WRIT M
    HIST 1420 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • Truth on Trial: Justice in Italy, 1400-1800

    Why do we think that one human being can judge another? How did this activity, enshrined in legal and political systems, profoundly shape society? This course examines the changing face of justice, from the medieval ordeal to judicial torture; the expansion of inquisitorial and state law courts; and the eventual disillusionment with the use of torture and the death penalty in the eighteenth century. Using Italy as a focus, the course explores how law courts defined social, political, scientific, and religious truth in Italy. Students may pursue a project on another geographical area for their final project for the course. LILE WRIT P
    HIST 1430 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Castiglione
  • The Making of the Modern Middle East

    From North Africa to Afghanistan, Turkey to the Arabian peninsula, the goal of this course is to provide students with a robust background in modern Middle Eastern history, broadly defined. We begin in the long nineteenth century, an era of intense social and economic transformation that led to the collapse of the Ottoman empire and emergence of a new state system, primarily under British and French colonial rule. We then explore forces shaping the contemporary region, including nationalism, oil, regional conflicts and the Cold War, Islamism and mass politics, and military interventions by the US and other world powers. M
    HIST 1455 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
  • History of Medicine II: The Development of Scientific Medicine in Europe and the World

    From the 18th century onward, Western medicine has claimed universal validity due to its scientific foundations, relegating other kinds of medicine to the status of "alternative" practices. The course therefore examines the development of scientific medicine in Europe and elsewhere up to the late 20th century, and its relationships with other medical ideas, practices, and traditions. Students with a knowledge of languages and the social and natural sciences are welcome but no prerequisites are required. Not open to first year students. E
    HIST 1491 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • China and Chinese Overseas

    The history of China is inseparable from the history of the Chinese communities overseas; neither can be understood outside of the context of the history of the world. Territorial and economic expansion, along with the movement of people and ideas, shaped the history of China and of Chinese migration over the course of the past millennium. These processes accelerated as the world became increasingly connected and globalized towards the end of the nineteenth century. Besides examining the turning points of this process, we will focus on the Chinese state’s policy regarding migration and its relationship with the Chinese living overseas.
    HIST 1505 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Belogurova
  • Samurai and Merchants, Prostitutes and Priests: Japanese Urban Culture in the Early Modern Period

    Examines the cultural traditions of the urban samurai, the wealthy merchant, and the plebian artisan that emerged in the great metropolises of Edo, Osaka, and Kyoto during the early modern period. Focuses on the efforts of the government to mold certain kinds of cultural development for its own purposes and the efforts of various social groups to redirect those efforts to suit their desires and self-interest. P
    HIST 1540 S01
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
  • A Commonwealth of Many Nations? Early Modern Poland-Lithuania

    The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth was the largest state in early-modern Europe, home to a diversity of ethnic and religious groups. We will examine how they lived together and interacted in this unique setting. The rise of the nobility and development of Poland's constitutional monarchy show how Polish identltiy was transformed. The interaction of Germans, Italians, Scots, and Jews as "national" groups within urban society, and the economic dynamism of Jews and Armenians reveal the possibilities and problems of social integration. The experiences of Protestants, the Ukranian Orthodox population, and the Moslem Tatars demonstrate the meaning and limitations of Polish religious tolerance. M
    HIST 1551 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
  • Japan's Pacific War: 1937-1945

    Uses film, oral histories, historical fiction, and more traditional forms of historical interpretation to explore the events, ideas, and legacies of Japan's Pacific War. The armed conflict began in 1937 with the Japanese invasion of China and ended in 1945 with the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Some attention is paid to military developments, but the principle concerns fall into the areas of mutual images, mobilization, and memory. M
    HIST 1570 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Reform and Rebellion: Mexico, 1700-1867

    This course focuses on Mexico's difficult transition from colony to nation. We will examine the key political, social, economic, and cultural developments during this period. Major topics will include: the paradoxical eighteenth century, which saw Mexico emerge as the most prosperous region of the Spanish empire, even as social and economic tensions deepened; the outbreak of peasant rebellions in the early nineteenth century; the elite-led movement for independence; the economic decline and political turmoil of the early republic; foreign interventions by the United States and France; and the rise of the Liberals as Mexico's dominant political force. E
    HIST 1610 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Colonial Latin America

    Colonial Latin America, from Columbus's voyage in 1492 to Independence in the nineteenth century, was the creation of three peoples: Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans. The Spanish and Portuguese conquerors brought with them the world of the Crusades, the Inquisition, and the Renaissance. Native Americans lived there already, in rich empires and hunter-gatherer bands. Africans came as slaves from Senegal, Nigeria, Congo and Angola, bringing old traditions and creating new ones. These diverse peoples blended together to form a new people. This was a place of violence, slavery and oppression -- but also of art, faith, new societies and new ideas. P
    HIST 1620 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
  • Modern Latin America

    This course is an introduction to the history of modern Latin America. Through lectures, discussions, shared readings, we will explore major themes in the past two hundred years of Latin American history, from the early nineteenth-century independence movements to the recent “Left Turn” in Latin American politics. Some of the topics we will examine include the racial politics of state-formation; the fraught history of U.S.-Latin American relations; the cultural politics of nationalism; how modernity was defined in relation to gender and sexuality; and the emergence of authoritarian regimes and revolutionary mobilizations, and the role of religion in shaping these processes. M
    HIST 1630 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rodriguez
  • Sub-Saharan Africa, 1945-2015: Sovereign States and Modern Developments

    This course begins with the end of imperialism and ends with a look toward the future. Themes include the pivotal importance of the newly sovereign states, the ongoing engagement with the rest of the world, and shared opinion about the imperative of modern development, even as definitions of modern and development differed. Readings include many primary sources, supplemented by articles on history and social science. Evaluation is based on participation, a map quiz, mid-term and final examinations, and short writing examinations, including article reviews. Students will also discover, analyze, and edit two new primary sources. M WRIT
    HIST 1637 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • From Medieval Bedlam to Prozac Nation: Intimate Histories of Psychiatry and Self

    Humankind has long sought out keepers of its secrets and interpreters of its dreams: seers, priests, and, finally, psychiatrists. This lecture course will introduce students to the history of psychiatry in Europe, the United States, and beyond, from its pre-modern antecedents through the present day. Our focus will be on the long age of asylum psychiatry, but we will also consider the medical and social histories that intersect with, but are not contained by, asylum psychiatry: the rise of modern diagnostic systems, psychoanalysis, sexuality and stigma, race, eugenics, and pharmaceutical presents and futures. M
    HIST 1681 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
  • The Intimate State: The Politics of Gender, Sex, and Family in the U.S., 1873-Present

    Examines the "intimate politics" of gender norms, sex and sexuality, and family structure in American history, from the 1870s to the present, focusing on law and political conflict. Topics include laws regulating sex and marriage; social norms governing gender roles in both private and public spheres; the range of political perspectives (from feminist to conservative) on sex, sexuality, and family, and the relationship of gender to notions of nationhood and the role of the modern state. Some background in history strongly recommended. M
    HIST 1755 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Self
  • Science and Capitalism

    We will explore the longstanding relationship between science and commerce from the 17th century to our own asking when the modern notion of science as a disinterested pursuit of objective truth took root. We will also explore how knowledge of the natural world has been shaped by personal, financial, and other kinds of self-interest in a number of diverse contexts ranging from Galileo’s invention of the telescope in Renaissance Italy to to the patenting of genetically engineered organisms in today's world, paying special attention to the diverse mechanisms that have been devised to guard against fraud and disinformation. E
    HIST 1783 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
  • American Legal and Constitutional History

    History of American law and constitutions from European settlement to the end of the 20th century. Not a comprehensive survey but a study of specific issues or episodes connecting law and history, including witchcraft trials, slavery, contests over Native American lands, delineations of race and gender, regulation of morals and the economy, and the construction of privacy. E
    HIST 1850 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
  • American Empire Since 1890

    This survey of twentieth-century US foreign relations will focus on the interplay between the rise of the United States as a superpower and American culture and society. Topics include: ideology and U.S. foreign policy, imperialism and American political culture, U.S. social movements and international affairs, and the relationship between U.S. power abroad and domestic race, gender and class arrangements. M
    HIST 1900 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
  • History of American School Reform (EDUC 1200)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 1200 (CRN 23937).
  • Roman History II: The Roman Empire and Its Impact (CLAS 1320)

    Interested students must register for CLAS 1320 (CRN 25066).
  • Introduction to Yiddish Culture (JUDS 1713)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 1713 (CRN 24808).
  • Brazil: From Conquest to the End of Slavery

    This class surveys the history of Brazil from the early phase of Portuguese conquest in the sixteenth century to the end of African slavery at the end of the nineteenth century. We pay close attention to religious and cultural exchange, as well as Brazilian social and economic ties to African through transatlantic slave trade. We devote significant attention to subaltern groups in Brazilian society, focusing on women role in Brazilian colonial society and African and African descent people agency in the context of abolition of slavery in Brazil. We will make extensive use of movies, YouTube videos, and radio interviews. P
    HIST 1953 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
  • Museum Histories (AMST 1903I)

    Interested students must register for AMST 1903I (CRN 24373).
  • Urban Schools in Historical Perspective (EDUC 1720)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 1720 (CRN 24126).
  • Modernity, Jews, and Urban Identities in Central Europe (JUDS 1718)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 1718 (CRN 25503).
  • Global Empires in the Early Modern World (POBS 1600U)

    Interested students must register for POBS 1600U (CRN 25837).
  • Zionists Anti Zionists and Post Zionists: Jewish Controversies in the 20th Century (JUDS 1752)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 1752 (CRN 26148).
  • Social Change in the 1960s

    The 1960s continue to resonate in today's culture as the decade left an indelible imprint on the present society. This course focuses on the tumultuous decade and incorporates the following topics: the Civil Rights Movement, race and ethnicity, the Women's Movement, the Peace movement, student movements, Vietnam War and foreign policy, sexuality, and cultural productions (music, film, art, photography). Lectures are rooted in historical narratives, but engage with interdisciplinary methodologies. In this way, as the semester unfolds we witness the complexity, the intertwining of movements and issues, and the evolution of cultural and political ideas and policy. M
    HIST 1965 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
  • Brazil Under Vargas: Reshaping the Nation

    How did Getúlio Vargas, a large rancher from the southern Brazil, end up playing such a significant role in country’s history during the twentieth century. This seminar will examine the conditions that brought Vargas to presidential power in 1930, the influence he had on economic development, cultural nationalism, and the shaping of ways Brazilian understand their country until 1945. We will consider his return to power in 1950 as a democratic and populist figure and evaluate his legacy and lasting influence on politics, economics, notions of nationalism, music, Carnival, and culture. M
    HIST 1970E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Green
  • The Nuclear Age

    This is a course for students interested in questions about the development of atomic weapons, their use on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Cold War arms race that followed, and debates over the risks associated with other nuclear technologies. We will look carefully at the scientific and military imperatives behind the Manhattan Project, the decisions that led to the use of atomic weapons on Japan, and subsequent efforts to reflect on the consequences of those choices. We will also explore how popular protest and popular culture after 1945 shaped our understanding of the terrors and promise of the nuclear age. WRIT
    HIST 1970M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Colonial Modernities: Europe and the Middle East

    Co-taught by Professors Doumani and Steinberg, this seminar will focus on the mutually constitutive relationship between Europe and the Middle East from 1850 to the present. We will look at cities such as Beirut, Berlin, Cairo, Damascus, Jaffa, London, and Paris and pay attention to themes and methods of social and cultural urban history. We will examine how historical experience both ratifies and interrogates the asymmetries of global and regional political conditions, providing new insights into leading topics and tropes such as orientalism, colonialism, imperialism, and post-coloniality. M
    HIST 1970R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
  • Digital History: Long-term Thinking and the Power of Big Data

    In the last decade, millions of books and newspapers from our collective past have been digitized. New tools like topic modeling or digital maps have appeared to cut through information overload. In policy and the media, we argue about long-term data about the climate, prosperity, and inequality. What can the skills of the historian offer for making sense of long-term change? Advanced historical coursework OR knowledge of code is required. Students should write the Instructor if they want to be added to the waitlist. M
    HIST 1971D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
  • Globalization and Asia

    Globalization is a contested concept and a controversial subject. In this course we will try to get an idea how and why it is so. This course will provide a snapshot of the history of some processes that can be described as the globalization of Asia in their regional and Eurasian contexts from the beginning of sustained global contacts in the 1600s until today. As we think about these issues, we will also focus on the methodology of historical research and source criticism.
    HIST 1971K S01
    Primary Instructor
    Belogurova
  • America and the Middle East: Social and Cultural Histories in Tandem

    This seminar explores the evolving relations between the diverse states and peoples of the Middle East and North America through the lenses of social and cultural historians. While our course proceeds chronologically tracing primarily US foreign relations with the “Mideast”, we will not stop there. Rather, we’ll read closely for underlying socioeconomic and cultural processes—including trade patterns, migrant networks, and evolving conceptions of race, religion, and citizenship—themes often ignored by conventional histories that dwell on watershed events, personalities, and conflict. Our goal: to recognize how US-Mideast relations are far more complex, rich, and deep-rooted than is generally assumed. M
    HIST 1971M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
  • From Emancipation To Obama

    This course develops a deep reading knowledge of significant issues and themes that define African American experiences in the 20th century, experiences that begin with the years following Emancipation and culminates with the election of President Obama. Themes include citizenship, gender, labor, politics, and culture. The goal is to develop critical analysis and historiographical depth. Some background in twentieth century United States history is preferred but not required. Assignments include weekly reading responses, class participation and presentation, and two written papers. Enrollment limited to 20. DPLL WRIT M
    HIST 1971X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
  • Sex, Power, and God: A Medieval Perspective

    Cross-dressing knights, virgin saints, homophobic priests, and mystics who speak in the language of erotic desire are but some of the medieval people considered in this seminar. This course examines how conceptions of sin, sanctity, and sexuality in the High Middle Ages intersected with structures of power in this period. While the seminar primarily focuses on Christian culture, it also considers Muslim and Jewish experience. Enrollment limited to 20. WRIT P
    HIST 1972H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
  • Outside the Mainstream

    When ratifying the UN Covenant on Civil Rights in 1979, its representative reported, "The right of any person to enjoy his own culture... is ensured under Japanese law. However, minorities... do not exist in Japan." Nothing could have been further from the truth. Japan is - and for a long time, has been - home to immigrants, indigenous populations forced to accept Japanese citizenship, outcast communities of Japanese ethnicity, and otherwise ordinary persons who live outside the mainstream as outlaws and prostitutes. This course examines how these minority communities came into existence and struggled to maintain distinctive lifestyles in what many view as an extraordinarily homogenous society. Enrollment limited to 20 students. M
    HIST 1973M S02
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
  • Slave Rebellion and Conspiracy in Early America: Methods and Research

    This course invites students to conduct original research into slave insurrections and conspiracy trials in the British Atlantic colonies. Working in the JCB Library, students will explore a period of slave unrest between 1725 and 1748 that has long puzzled historians. From rebellions in the Caribbean to the New York City conspiracy trials of 1741, scholars continue to wonder at the causes and connections between these events. As they read through the literature and examine documents, students will also explore broader questions about the origins of racial violence and the meaning of liberty and slavery for early Americans.
    HIST 1974Y S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pope
  • Women and Gender Relations in China, Past and Present

    The government of the People's Republic of China has, since early in its history, stated as one of its goals the "liberation" of women from the institutions, customs, and attitudes that had long limited their access to power and personal fulfillment within Chinese society. We will consider, first, the assumptions about China's past made in this claim, by examining the roles that women played in the early modern Chinese society and economy. Second, we will turn to the changes of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries to discover how modern political, social, and economic transformations have reshaped women's lives and opportunities. Enrollment limited to 20. P
    HIST 1976E S02
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
  • History of the Andes from the Inca Empire to Evo Morales

    Before the Spanish invaded in the 1530s, western South America was the scene of the largest state the New World had ever known, Tawantinsuyu, the Inca empire. During almost 300 years of colonial rule, the Andean provinces were shared by the "Republic of Spaniards" and the "Republic of Indians" - two separate societies, one dominating and exploiting the other. Today the region remains in many ways colonial, as Quechua- and Aymara-speaking villagers face a Spanish-speaking state, as well as an ever-more-integrated world market, the pressures of neoliberal reform from international banks, and the melting of the Andean glaciers. Enrollment limited to 20. E WRIT
    HIST 1976T S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
  • Twentieth Century Iran

    This history of Iran in the 20th century is bracketed by two revolutions. The Constitutional Revolution of 1906 set in place the Middle East's first parliamentary democracy; the second in 1979 ended 2500 years of monarchical reign. The 1953 Coup that ousted the democratically elected prime minister was the CIA's first Cold War era covert operation and British intelligence's last. The Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s was the 20th century's longest war, leaving a million Iranian casualties. The course examines Iran's intellectuals, writers, artists, and filmmakers, highlighting their debates on colonialism, democracy, modernity, and political Islam. Enrollment limited to 20.
    HIST 1977M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Balaghi
  • Decolonizing Minds: A People's History of the World

    This seminar will explore the knowledge-production and military-financial infrastructures that maintain empires, and the means through which people have resisted or embraced empire. While some attention will be made to the 19th and early 20th century colonial context, the bulk of the course will focus on the Cold War liberal era to the neoliberal regime that continues today. Topics include: popular culture and ideology, Cold War university, area studies, international anti-war networks, transnational labor activism, the anti-colonial radical tradition, and the Arab Spring/Occupy Movements. Weekly readings; evaluation based on participation and analytical essays. Enrollment limited to 20 juniors and seniors. M
    HIST 1977Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
  • Ethnohistory of Native New England

    The histories of Natives peoples in New England have been written about since the first Europeans arrived in this region. Over time and for various reasons, these histories have been misrepresented in or “vanished” from our shared national history. This course will offer students an opportunity to develop a more complete and complex understanding of the histories and cultures of indigenous people through the integration of archaeology, archival research, oral history, and material culture studies. This course will highlight Indian dispossession, resistance, ethnic identity and citizenship, gender roles, mobility, and labor patterns.
  • Fascism in Europe, 1919-1945

    Today, many are concerned with the possibility of fascism’s come back in the form of extreme rights in present-day Europe. What sets fascist movements apart from other kinds of revolutionary and/or nationalist movements? We will review several broad explanations about the theory of fascism before turning to a more detailed examination of some of history's most fearsome leaders, regimes and organizations. Specific cases include Italian Fascism and German National Socialism but also less familiar movements such as the Iron Guard in Romania, the Arrow Cross in Hungary, Grey Wolves in Turkey, British Union of Fascists and Croix de Feu in France.
    HIST 1977X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kadercan
  • The American Revolution and its Aftermath

    This course explores the causes and consequences of the American Revolution. The first half covers strains in the colonial relationship between North America and Britain in the decades prior to 1776, as well as the War itself. The second half of the course will be devoted to nation-building in the roughly half century following independence. This course is meant to familiarize students with Americans’ domestic and international concerns as they sought to achieve political and economic independence. It will also introduce students to major historiographical debates on Revolutionary America and will culminate in a primary source-based research paper.
    HIST 1978F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Regele
  • Descartes' World

    An exploration of history and historical fiction through the examination of the early life of René Descartes, one of the most famous “French” philosophers of the 17th century. Little is known about his personal life, however, especially before he left France for good in 1628, despite many hints about his years as a soldier, his extensive travels in Europe, and his possible political and occult associations. This seminar is designed as a collective exploration into the small pieces of evidence about his early life and the lives of his friends and enemies in order to understand it imaginatively but truthfully. P
    HIST 1979H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • She's So Chic! Fashion, Gender, and Nationalism in French History

    From its beginnings, the fashion industry in France has been synonymous with the international reputation of the nation. Similarly, being “chic,” having an innate sense of discernment and style, became synonymous with French femininity. This seminar will explore the interconnectivity of the history of fashion in France, the requirements it placed on French women, and the pressures the fashion industry has borne since the 1700s. We will look at how fashion reflected and created the moods of various periods, and we will also see how French women’s national belonging has been innately tied to ability to display French fashion. E
    HIST 1979L S02
    Primary Instructor
    Colvin
  • Environmental History of Latin America, 1492-2014

    From the development of sugar as the major slave commodity of the 18th century Caribbean to the “Water Wars” in the Bolivian highlands at the turn of the 21st century, race, labor, and imperialism in Latin America have been shaped in relation to the natural environment. This course explores the role of the environment in the colonial and modern history of Latin America. Together, we will examine how the environment shaped the processes of conquest, displacement, settlement, and trade, as well as how these processes transformed the natural environment throughout the hemisphere. E
    HIST 1979N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rodriguez
  • Fin-de-Siècle Vienna: Politics and Culture

    This seminar explores the history of Vienna from 1860-1914, focusing specifically on politics, culture, and their intersection. Stefan Zweig looked back on Vienna as “The World of Yesterday” for its imperial pomp, coffee house debates, and decadent pleasures. Yet, it was also “The World of Today.” In the years around 1900 Vienna became a cauldron of change, giving birth to movements like Zionism, the new European Right, modernist architecture, psychoanalysis, avant-garde music, and philosophical indeterminism. Students will not only read historical accounts of Vienna, but also immerse themselves in its culture through literature, film, music, and philosophy.
    HIST 1979O S01
    Primary Instructor
    Gentry
  • Undergraduate Reading Courses

    Guided reading on selected topics. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Watson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Widmer
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History Honors Workshop for Prospective Thesis Writers

    HIST 1992 and HIST 1993 students meet together as the History Honors Workshop, offered in two separate sections per week. Prospective honors students are encouraged to enroll in HIST 1992 during semesters 5 or 6. HIST 1992 offers a consideration of historical methodology and techniques of writing and research with the goal of preparing to write a senior thesis in history, allowing students to refine research skills, define a project, prepare a thesis prospectus, required for admission to honors. Students who complete honors may count HIST 1992 as a concentration requirement. Limited to juniors who qualify for the honors program. WRIT
    HIST 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    HIST 1992 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part I

    HIST 1992 and HIST 1993 students meet together as the History Honors Workshop, offered in two separate sections per week. All students admitted to the History Honors Program must enroll in HIST 1993 for two semesters of thesis research and writing. They may enroll in the course during semesters 6 and 7, or 7 and 8. Course work entails researching, organizing, writing a history honors thesis. Presentation of work and critique of peers' work required. Limited to seniors and juniors who have been admitted to History Honors Program. HIST 1993 is a mandatory S/NC course. See History Concentration Honors Requirements.
    HIST 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    HIST 1993 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part II

    This is the second half of a year-long course, upon completion the grade will revert to HIST 1993. Prerequisite: HIST 1993. WRIT
    HIST 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    HIST 1994 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    HIST 2890 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 2910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S08
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Weinstein
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Mandel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Castiglione
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S37
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S38
    Primary Instructor
    Steinberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S39
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S40
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Professionalization Seminar

    Required of all second year Ph.D. students; includes participation in Thursday Lecture Series. E
    HIST 2950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lambe
  • Prospectus Development Seminar

    This required course open only to second-year students in the History Ph.D. program focuses on the development of a dissertation prospectus. The seminar will include considering the process of choosing a dissertation topic, selecting a dissertation committee, identifying viable dissertation projects, articulating a project in the form of a prospectus, and developing research grant proposals based on the prosectus. E
    HIST 2960 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
  • Race, Ethnicity and Identity in the Atlantic World

    Explores question of identity in Atlantic world from sixteenth to nineteenth century, focusing on three types of identity: 1) ethnicity; 2) race; 3) nationality. How are such identities created and maintained? Are they "natural" or "artificial"? How do they change over time, and why? Throughout the seminar, we'll consider both internal/external boundaries, how social actors - particularly subalterns - see themselves and how they are imagined by outsiders. Finally, we will examine how identity is expressed in a wide variety of media - codices, paintings, maps, oral histories, diaries, etc. - and how scholars make use of such sources.
    HIST 2970B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Slavery, Race, and Emancipation in 19th-Century America

    An introduction to slavery and emancipation from a variety of periods, places, and perspectives, with an emphasis on the theoretical and methodological issues involved in tackling these complex subjects. Although the bulk of the course focuses on 19th-century America, all subjects will be viewed in comparative and transnational perspectives.
    HIST 2970N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
  • The Frontiers of Empire

    This class will look at interactions along and across imperial frontier zones throughout the world, with an emphasis on the pre-modern and early modern period. Readings will be both theoretical and empirical in nature, and will focus on themes including the conceptualization of space; practices and consequences of warfare, captive-taking, and slavery; identity- and secondary state-formation; economy and society; diplomacy and the negotiation of claims to authority.
    HIST 2981C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
  • Environmental History

    A topical seminar with global and chronologically broad scope, "Environmental History" surveys classic works and recent writing on explicitly environmental themes such as agriculture, conservation, energy, and anthropogenic change. Equally, it considers environmental treatments of major topics in other sub-fields such as war, science, imperialism, the body and senses, and animals. In examining this broad range of topics, we will seek what is distinctive about environmental history and how environmental considerations can enhance the students' own research.
    HIST 2981E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • The Politics of Knowledge

    The seminar offers an introduction to fundamental theoretical texts and exemplary works in the interdisciplinary field of Science and Technology Studies. Readings will be drawn from a range of time periods and geographical areas, and students will be asked to deploy the theoretical insights of our readings in working with sources in their own fields for a final research paper. Topics include: the gendered dimensions of knowledge, the moral economy of science, claims to expertise, and the stakes of "objectivity."
    HIST 2981F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    HIST 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep