Courses for Fall 2014

  • History of Capitalism

    Capitalism didn't just spring from the brain of Adam Smith. Its logic is not encoded on human DNA, and its practices are not the inevitable outcome of supply and demand. So how did capitalism become the dominant economic system of the modern world? History can provide an answer by exploring the interaction of culture and politics, technology and enterprise, and opportunity and exploitation from the era of the Atlantic Slave Trade to the 2008 Financial Crisis. HIST 0150 courses introduce students to methods of historical analysis, interpretation, and argument. This class presumes no economics background, nor previous history courses. E
    HIST 0150A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
  • Locked Up: A Global History of Prison and Captivity

    A long history lies behind the millions of men and women locked up today as prisoners, captives and hostages. Beginning in antiquity and ending in the present, this course draws on materials from a variety of cultures across the world to explore incarceration's centuries-old past. In examining the experience and meaning of imprisonment, whether as judicial punishment, political repression, or the fallout of war, the class will ask fundamental questions about liberty as well. History 150 courses introduce students to methods of historical analysis, interpretation and argumentation. This course presumes no previous history courses. E
    HIST 0150C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
  • Israel's Wars (JUDS 0050H)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 0050H (CRN 16636).
  • The Campus on Fire: American Colleges and Universities in the 1960's (EDUC 0400)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 0400 (CRN 14632).
  • Brown v. Board of Education (EDUC 0610)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 0610 (CRN 16224).
  • Tropical Delights: Imagining Brazil in History and Culture

    Examines the many ways that Brazilians and foreigners have understood this vast continent-size country, ranging from early European explorers' anxieties about Cannibalism to modern images of the Amazonian rainforest, Rio De Janeiro's freewheeling Carnival celebrations, and the array of social movements mobilizing for social justice. Through an examination of historical sources, literature, movies, and popular culture, this seminar will consider how multiple images and projections of Brazil have shaped national and international notions about the country. Reserved for First Year students. Enrollment limited to 20. FYS E
    HIST 0970B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Green
  • Abraham Lincoln: Historical and Cultural Perspectives

    This seminar uses the life, legacy, and myth of Abraham Lincoln to explore central themes such as the frontier in the early republic, the nature of political leadership, law and legal culture, and the emergence of sectionalism, slavery, antislavery, and Civil War. Sources are drawn from Lincoln’s works, the writings of his contemporaries, and modern non-fiction, fiction, and film. The course enables us to consider two larger themes: 1) the relationship between memory and history; and 2) the function of history in modern society. The course has no prerequisites and does not presuppose special knowledge of American history. M FYS
    HIST 0970O S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
  • The Holocaust in Historical Perspective

    The course will examine the history and historiography of the Holocaust from early accounts to recent reconstructions of the origins, implementation, and aftermath of the "Final Solution." We will also analyze documents, testimonies, memoirs, trial records, and various forms of representations and commemorations of the Shoah. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT M
    HIST 0970R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
  • Sport in American History

    This course covers the relationship of sports to aspects of American culture since 1900. Topics include gender, race, amateurism, professionalism, intercollegiate athletics, and sports heroes. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS M
    HIST 0970S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
  • The Age of Revolutions, 1760-1824

    In the middle of the eighteenth century, the Americas belonged to a handful of European monarchies; within a few decades, most of the Americas was composed of independent republics, some of the European monarchs were either deposed or quaking on their thrones. Usually considered separately, revolutions in British North America, France, Saint-Domingue (Haiti) and Spanish America had diverse local circumstances yet composed a single cycle of intellectual ferment, imperial reform, accelerating violence and, forging of new political communities. We will examine revolutions that helped create the world we live in. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. E FYS WRIT
    HIST 0971G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mumford
  • Science and Society in Darwin's England

    This course is a first year seminar designed to introduce students to the study of history. It will be divided into two very different parts. The first part will be organized as a traditional history seminar in which we explore together the world in which Darwin developed his theory of the Origin of Species. The second part will be a historical re-enactment of an 1863 discussion in Britain's Royal Society about whether to award Darwin their highest honor, the Copley Medal. Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT M
    HIST 0971I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
  • Modern Caribbean History

    This course will cover the political, social, and cultural history of the Caribbean from 1492 to the present. Topics include incursions from the outside world across time; the historical evolution of oppositional and radical currents within the Caribbean, such as anti-imperialism, transnationalism, Marxism, and Pan-Africanism; and the rich cultural legacies of historical processes. Cuba, Jamaica, and Haiti as case studies. FYS M
  • The Rise of Abolitionism in the Atlantic World: Americas, Europe, and Africa

    This class examines the rise of abolitionism and colonialism in the Atlantic world in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We will begin by analyzing the intellectual, political, and economic foundations of the movement for the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade, assessing its spread and impact to the Americas and Africa. The class devotes significant attention to the suppression of the slave trade in the Lusophone Atlantic world (Angola, Brazil, and Portugal). Enrollment limited to 20 first year students. FYS WRIT P
    HIST 0971M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
  • Warriors, Lovers, and Saints: The Middle Eastern Story-Cycle in Historical Context

    Explore the Islamic Middle East and its cultures through ‘epic’ story-cycles taken from Arabic, Persian and Turkish. Examine medieval stories in historical context, discussing the nature of rule, the organization of society, the layering of Islam onto earlier religious beliefs and practices, and the persistence of their social values in contemporary society. Topics include: warrior ethos, the gendering of power and relationships, masculine and feminine ideals, the sufi (mystical) path and its effects on society, the nature of love and justice, and the ways in which animals are perceived as crucial social actors and activists. P FYS
    HIST 0971N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
  • Disease, Death, and Society in the Modern History of the Americas

    This seminar explores how disease has shaped the modern history of the Americas. From the epidemics of nineteenth-century New York and Buenos Aires that fed nativist anti-immigrant sentiment, to the imperial politics of yellow fever control under U.S.-occupied Cuba, to state responses to the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Haiti and the U.S., disease has played a powerful role in shaping the history of our hemisphere. Together, we will explore ways of thinking about disease and public health as topics of historical inquiry, and examine how health politics have been shaped by processes of imperialism, sexuality, and racial and ethnic politics. FYS WRIT M
  • The Long Fall of the Roman Empire

    Once thought of as the "Dark Ages," this period of western European history should instead be seen as a fascinating time in which late Roman culture fused with that of the Germanic tribes, a mixture tempered by a new religion, Christianity. Issues of particular concern include the symbolic construction of political authority, the role of religion, the nature of social loyalties, and gender roles. P
    HIST 1030 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
  • Europe Since 1945

    This course surveys political, economic, social, and cultural developments in Europe after the end of the Second World War. The two world wars radically transformed European civilization. Adopting a mixed chronological and thematic approach, this course will analyze these changes and explore the diverse efforts to (re)construct Europe after 1945. We will pay particular attention to the legacy of the Holocaust, the Cold War and its enduring legacies for Europe, decolonization and immigration, transnational identities and the idea of a cosmopolitan Europe. The course will consist of lectures/discussions. No previous history courses are required for successful completion of this course. M
  • The French Revolution

    This course aims to provide a basic factual knowledge of the French Revolution, an understanding of the major historiographic debates about the revolutionary period, and a sense of the worldwide impact of events occurring in late-eighteenth century France. A strong historiographic focus will direct our attention to the gendered nature of the revolutionary project; the tension between liberty and equality that runs throughout French history; the intersection of race and citizenship in the Revolution; and the plausibility of competing social, political, and cultural interpretations of the Revolution. M
    HIST 1150 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Revill
  • Land Use and Capitalism, 1350-2013

    This course offers an overview of major traditions for analyzing landscape in political economy, theology, literature, anthropology, asking how imaginary landscapes of the mind become the material realities of farm and highway. Themes will include the rise of modern, surveying, engineering, cities, infrastructure systems, and land reform. It will ask how historic models of government have played out in an era of environmental disaster, famine, mortgages, and evictions. We will explore tensions between political centralization and heterotopias, nomadic and settled people, peoples' movements and finance, exploring questions about the spiritual, economic, aesthetic, ecological, political relationship of people to territory. M
    HIST 1311 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
  • Modern Genocide and Other Crimes against Humanity

    This course explores the emergence, evolution, varieties, underlying causes, and means of confronting and coming to terms with genocide and other crimes against humanity in the 20th century. We will discuss the origins of genocide and the subsequent conceptualization of this phenomenon; manifestations of colonial, imperial, racial, and communist genocide; war crimes and mass crimes by totalitarian regimes; and policies of mass expulsions and "ethnic cleansing." We will conclude with attempts to curb and punish genocide by means of international justice. M
    HIST 1350 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
  • Afghanistan: Crossroads of Empires to America's Longest War

    The primary goal of this seminar is to broaden and deepen students' knowledge of Afghanistan’s history on topics ranging from geography and society to key events and personalities. Second, the course is designed to provide more sophisticated understandings of Afghanistan’s politics and cultures, by contextualizing ongoing developments concerning the country and its people, relations with its neighbors, and role in the modern world. Third, we'll illustrate Afghanistan's unique status as a transregional borderland between three "Area Studies" in US academia—Middle East, Central Asia, South Asia—providing a springboard for advanced study or work in one or more fields. M
    HIST 1461 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
  • History of Medicine I: Medical Traditions in the Old World Before 1700

    People have always attempted to promote health and prolong life, and to ameliorate bodily suffering. Those living in parts of Eurasia also developed textual traditions that, together with material remains, allow historians to explore their medical practices and explanations, including changes in their traditions, sometimes caused by interactions with other peoples of Europe, Asia, and Africa. The course will introduce students to the major medical traditions of the Old World to about 1700, with an emphasis on Europe, and explore some of the reasons for change. A knowledge of languages and the social and natural sciences is welcome but not required. Not open to first year students. P
    HIST 1490 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • Modern Korea: Contending with Modernity

    This course examines the extraordinarily rapid revolution of Korea from isolated, agrarian society into a culturally modern, industrialized, and democratic nation that is an important actor on the world stage. It also will investigate how a non-Western society generates its own inspiration for human relations, social structure, political and cultural values. Includes coverage of North Korea. M
    HIST 1530 S01
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
  • Slavery in the Early Modern World

    There were multiple forms of slavery in the Early Modern world. We will look at three major systems: Mediterranean slavery and the Barbary Corsairs, Black Sea slavery and the slave elites of the Ottoman Empire, and the Atlantic triangular trade. We will examine the religious, political, racial, and economic bases for these slave systems, and compare the experiences of individual slaves and slave societies. Topics discussed include gender and sexuality (e.g. the institution of the Harem and the eunuchs who ran it), the connection between piracy and slavery, and the roles of slavery in shaping the Western world. M
    HIST 1553 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Teller
  • The Making of Modern East Asia

    This course examines Asia in the shaping of the modern world, from competing definitions of empires circa 1800 to the rise of the notion of the twenty-first as a "Pacific Century." It investigates the definition(s) of Asia as a world region, explores transnational interactions and emphasizes Asians as historical actors via written, visual and aural sources. Events are placed in the context of key historical paradigms, including varying definitions of modernity, the rise of the nation-state, birth of mass politics, new mechanisms of war, the language of self-determination, changing views of gender, shifting types of media and consumption, etc. M WRIT
    HIST 1571 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • Gandhi's India: South Asia Before 1947

    Gandhi's India tracks the emergence and transformations of British colonial rule in the Indian subcontinent, the insurgencies and the cultural and economic critiques that shaped anti-colonial nationalism, the conflicts that fueled religious differences and the ideas that shaped non-violent civil disobedience as a unique form of resistance. With readings from Gandhi, Marx and Tagore, amongst others, this course interrogates relationships between power and knowledge, histories from below, as well as violence and political mobilizations that would, by the mid-twentieth century, bring down an empire and create a bloody and enduring divide with the birth of two nation-states. M
    HIST 1580 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
  • The Rise and Fall of the Aztecs: Mexico, 1300-1600

    This course will chart the evolution of the Mexica (better known as the Aztecs) from nomads to the dominant people of central Mexico; examine their political, cultural, and religious practices (including human sacrifice); explore the structure and limitations of their empire; and analyze their defeat by Spanish conquistadors and their response to European colonization. We will draw upon a variety of pre- and post-conquest sources, treating the Aztecs as a case study in the challenges of ethnohistory.
    HIST 1600 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Sub-Saharan Africa, c. 1850-1946: Colonial Contexts and Everyday Experiences

    This course considers major actors and developments in sub-Saharan Africa from the mid-nineteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries. With a critical awareness of the ways that Africa's past has been narrated, it balances coverage of the state and economy with attention to daily life, families, and popular culture. The majority of the reading assignments are drawn from contemporary documents, commentaries, interviews, and memoirs. Works produced by historians supplements these. Students will analyze change, question perspectives, and imagine life during the age of European imperialism. Written assignments include a book review, two examinations, and identifying and editing a primary source text. WRIT M
    HIST 1639 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Brazil: From Abolition to Emerging World Power

    How did Brazil transform itself from a slave society in 1888 to rising international economic and political force? This course will examine the history of Brazil from the end of slavery to the present. We will analyze the reasons for the fall of the Empire and the establishment of a Republic, the transformations that took place as immigrants arrived from Europe, Japan, and the Middle East in the early twentieth century, and the search for new forms of national identity. We will study the rise of authoritarian regimes and the search for democratic governance in more recent years. M
    HIST 1671 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Green
  • The American Civil War

    In this course we will investigate the "felt histories" of the American Civil War—the personal experiences of Americans (northerners and southerners, slaves and freed people, European immigrants and Native Americans, men and women) who fought its battles and bore its consequences. These histories, as Robert Penn Warren notes, are an "index to the very complexity, depth, and fundamental significance" of the conflict. In addition to military and political dimensions we will also examine constructions of Civil War memory (photography, film, and other media) and the dominant narratives that have shaped our understanding of the war since 1865. M
    HIST 1740 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
  • American Politics and Culture Since 1945

    History of the United States between the end of World War II and the present. Major themes and topics include race and civil rights, women's history and feminism, the Cold War, Vietnam, and U.S. foreign policy, suburbanization and the urban crisis, the rise and fall of the welfare state, and a history of consumption and popular culture. M
    HIST 1750 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Self
  • Environmental History

    Environmental history examines the changing relationship between human beings and their physical surroundings. We will actively question the boundary between nature and culture, showing how social and natural history mutually inform one another. We will do so by asking three interrelated questions. First, how has the material context in which history unfolded impacted the development of our culture, society, and economy? Second, how and why did people’s ideas and representations of the natural world change over time? Finally, in what ways and to what ends have human beings actively though not always intentionally altered their physical surroundings? M
    HIST 1790 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
  • American Urban History to 1870

    Both a survey covering urbanization in America from colonial times to the present, and a specialized focus exploring American history from an urban frame of reference. Examines the premodern, "walking" city from 1600-1870. Includes such topics as cities in the Revolution and Civil War, the development of urban services, westward expansion, and social structure. E
    HIST 1820 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
  • Modern European Women + Gender History

    This course deals with the history of European women and gender from the Enlightenment to the present. It will focus on large historical themes and questions, especially shifting constructions of femininity and masculinity. It will begin with an analysis of eighteenth-century philosophies regarding women and gender, and it will move to examinations of specific topics such as industrialization, Victorian femininity, the suffrage movements, gender and the Great War, interwar sexuality, fascism, gender and the Second World War, and the sexual revolution. M
  • Empires in America to 1890

    This course surveys the development of American foreign relations from initial encounters between Native Americans and newly arrived Europeans to the extension of EuroAmerican power beyond the continental United States. By being attentive to a wider global context, we will attempt to understand the trajectory of "America" from a colonial hinterland to dominant world power. E
    HIST 1890 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
  • Academic Freedom on Trial: A Century of Campus Controversies (EDUC 1740)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 1740 (CRN 14633).
  • Word, Image and Power in Renaissance Italy (ITAL 1580)

    Interested students must register for ITAL 1580 (CRN 14900).
  • The History of American Education (EDUC 1020)

    Interested students must register for EDUC 1020 (CRN 14782).
  • Roman History I: The Rise and Fall of an Imperial Republic (CLAS 1310)

    Interested students must register for CLAS 1310 (CRN 15479).
  • Money, Power, Sex and Love: the Modern Jewish Family in Europe and America (JUDS1722)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 1722 (CRN 15095).
  • Society and Population in Ancient Greece (CLAS 1130)

    Interested students must register for CLAS 1130 (CRN 16015).
  • Portuguese Discoveries and Early Modern Globalization (POBS 1600D)

    Interested students must register for POBS 1600D (CRN 15500).
  • World of Walden Pond: Transcendentalism as a Social and Intellectual Movement (HMAN 1971F)

    Interested students must register for HMAN 1971F (CRN 16334).
  • American Jews and Israel: From AIPAC to J Street (JUDS 1717)

    Interested students must register for JUDS 1717 (CRN 16198).
  • Students and Scholars in the Modern Middle East

    In this course we examine the profound transformations shaping societies and cultures across the Middle East through the lives, writings, and educational institutions of students and scholars in the region. From “traditional” madrasas, seminaries, and yeshivas, to missionary schools and American universities, we’ll make use of memoirs, biographies, and other social histories to explore a range of institutions of learning—and their complex relationships with colonialism, nationalism, Islamism, and modern state-building. Our goal: to explore the contestations and negotiations between education, everyday life, and political authority—from participatory to autocratic modes, from Morocco to Afghanistan, from 1700 to the present. M
    HIST 1970A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
  • The Recent History of Life on Earth: The Anthropocene

    This seminar will explore ramifications of the concept of the Anthropocene. The Anthropocene has been proposed as a new human-driven geologic age that began with the increased exploitation of fossil fuels in the late eighteenth century. Its proponents emphasize transformations through anthropogenic climate change, but we will also consider the effects of population growth, pollution, habitat destruction, and extinction. To assess the historical validity of the concept, we will discuss the impact of humans on the environment before 1800, the extent of transformation since 1800, and whether human-environmental interactions can be usefully generalized to our species as a whole. M
    HIST 1970G S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
  • Christian Muslim Relations in the Middle Ages

    This course will examine Christian-Muslim relations during the eleventh through fifteenth centuries. It takes a broad definition of Christianity and includes the experiences of the Roman, Byzantine and Eastern churches. As a result, students will examine Christian-Muslim relations in a number of locations throughout the Mediterranean and Near East, ranging from Spain, the Levant, and Persia. Comparative views on sacred land, political and religious views, philosophy, polemics, learning and scientific understanding will be examined, with particular reference to primary texts in translation. WRIT, LILE, DPLL P
    HIST 1970N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Watson
  • Approaches to The Middle East

    This seminar introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Middle East Studies in the broader context of the history of area studies in the humanities and social sciences. Why and when did the Middle East become an area of study? What are the approaches and topics that have shaped the development of this field? And what are the political implications of contending visions for its future? The readings sample canonical and alternative works and the classes feature visits by leading scholars who research and write on this region. M
    HIST 1970Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
  • Radical Peasants, Rent Strikes, Land Reforms and Squats: A Global History

    Between 1890 and 1980, movements for freezing rents and redistributing haciendas transformed law in almost every nation in the world. In the form of the Via Campesina, global land movements constitute the most numerous movements today. Their contentions over land and water constitute one of the most coherent legal grounds for fighting global warming.

    Students will read of key documents from rent strikes, global governance, and liberation theology, gaining acquaintance with key events and authors. Exercises will involve using digital tools to analyze World Bank reports, primary-source documents from the global history of squatting, and independent research. M
    HIST 1970U S01
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
  • The Maya in the Modern World

    This seminar focuses on the Maya in postcolonial Guatemala. The main theme is the evolving relationship between indigenous peoples and the nation-state. Topics include peasant rebellions in the nineteenth century, the development and redefinition of ethnic identities, the military repression of the 1970s and 1980s, the Rigoberta Menchú controversy, and the Maya diaspora in Mexico and the United States. Enrollment limited to 20. M
    HIST 1973X S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
  • Seeing/Reading/Making Brown

    This research seminar asks when, how and why did Brown change from being a small, regional liberal arts college and become a “hot school” and a noted research university, and investigates the problems it faced along the way. It will involve the students in original research. E
    HIST 1976O S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lancaster
  • Charlemagne: Conquest, Empire, and the Making of the Middle Ages

    The age of Charlemagne sits at the nexus of antiquity and the middle ages. For two hundred years Charlemagne’s family, the Carolingians, welded together fragments of the splintered Roman imperial tradition and elements from the Germanic world to forge a new, medieval European civilization. This seminar examines that process by exposing students to the primary sources, archaeological evidence, and modern scholarly debates surrounding the Carolingian age. Topics include the Carolingians' rise to power; Charlemagne’s imperial coronation; interactions with the Islamic and Byzantine worlds; the revival of classical learning; the Church; warfare; the economy; Vikings; and the collapse of the Carolingian Empire. Enrollment limited to 20. Not open to first year students. WRIT P
    HIST 1976Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
  • Global Communism and Communists in East Asia

    This class explores the social history of the communist movement in Asia from the emergence of the first communist groups to the much heralded collapse of state socialism in Europe and the USSR in 1989. State socialism survived, most notably, in East Asia. How did people understand communism a century ago? How did ideas of communism change in processes of travel and translation across cultures? What is the popular memory of communism and how does it shape our today’s understandings of it? M
    HIST 1977V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Belogurova
  • Age of Impostors: Fraud, Identification, and the Self in Early Modern Europe

    Alchemists claiming to possess the philosophers' stone; basilisks for sale in the market; Jews pretending to be Catholics; women dressing as men: early modern Europe appeared to be an age of impostors. Officials responded to this perceived threat by hiring experts and creating courts, licenses, passports, and other new methods of surveillance in an era before reliable documentation, photography, and DNA. And yet one person's fraud was another's self-fashioning. We will examine instances of dissimulation, self-fashioning, and purported fraud, efforts to identify and stem deception, and debates about what was at stake when people and things were not what they seemed. Enrollment limited to 20.
    HIST 1978L S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
  • American Slavery and Its Afterlife

    This upper-level seminar considers slavery and its historical and contemporary legacies. Devoting about one third of the semester to an intellectual study of slavery mostly in the nineteenth century, the rest of the course unpacks what many scholars have called, “the afterlife of slavery.” A term introduced by literary scholars, the afterlife of slavery provides an interesting and provocative way to think about American culture and politics in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries as tied firmly to the institution that formed the economic basis of the founding of this nation.
    HIST 1979D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
  • Medieval Kyoto - Medieval Japan

    In the Western historical lexicon, the term “medieval” often conjures up images of backwardness and stagnation. Japan, however, pulsated with political, economic, and cultural creativity during its middle ages. This course explores topics central to Japan’s medieval revolution: -The emergence of a samurai-led shogunate and the creation of new warrior values -The appearance of Zen and popular religious sects -The creation of innovative “Zen arts” such as noh drama and the tea ceremony, and -The destruction of Kyoto and its subsequent resurgence in the sixteenth century as a city shared by aristocrats, merchants, and artisans. P
    HIST 1979E S01
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
  • Political Economy: The Intellectual History of Capitalism

    What are the intellectual underpinnings of modern capitalism? In this seminar, we will probe into history of economic thought by reading classic works by modern economists as well as more recent interpretations by intellectual historians. Among other things, we will discuss theories of value, property, markets, labor, inequality, and prices. We will also ask how the relationship between capitalism and other forms of production have been understood at various times. Throughout, we will pay particular attention to the different narratives and explanations that have been offered by working economists, economic historians, intellectual historians, philosophers, and historians of science. M
    HIST 1979F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
  • Double Fault! Race and Gender in Modern Sports History

    From 1936 Berlin Olympics to infamous East German swimmers of the Cold War to 1998 French soccer team, sport culture has consistently helped define overall societal values. We will examine how early modern societies defined the ideal sporting participant, and how shifts over time included and excluded various groups. These shifts, including the promotion of masculinity through duels, the fears of women’s emancipation via cycling, and the exclusion of Jews from competition, were based on perceived national needs. Through the study of sports, we will study who we have been as a community—as well as who we aspire to be. M
  • Undergraduate Reading Courses

    Guided reading on selected topics. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 1990 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History Honors Workshop for Prospective Thesis Writers

    HIST 1992 and HIST 1993 students meet together as the History Honors Workshop, offered in two separate sections per week. Prospective honors students are encouraged to enroll in HIST 1992 during semesters 5 or 6. HIST 1992 offers a consideration of historical methodology and techniques of writing and research with the goal of preparing to write a senior thesis in history, allowing students to refine research skills, define a project, prepare a thesis prospectus, required for admission to honors. Students who complete honors may count HIST 1992 as a concentration requirement. Limited to juniors who qualify for the honors program. WRIT
    HIST 1992 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part I

    HIST 1992 and HIST 1993 students meet together as the History Honors Workshop, offered in two separate sections per week. All students admitted to the History Honors Program must enroll in HIST 1993 for two semesters of thesis research and writing. They may enroll in the course during semesters 6 and 7, or 7 and 8. Course work entails researching, organizing, writing a history honors thesis. Presentation of work and critique of peers' work required. Limited to seniors and juniors who have been admitted to History Honors Program. HIST 1993 is a mandatory S/NC course. See History Concentration Honors Requirements.
    HIST 1993 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • History Honors Workshop for Thesis Writers, Part II

    This is the second half of a year-long course, upon completion the grade will revert to HIST 1993. Prerequisite: HIST 1993. WRIT
    HIST 1994 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    HIST 2890 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please see check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    HIST 2910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ahmed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bartov
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Hu-Dehart
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Chudacoff
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Cope
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Ferreira
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Self
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gluck
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Harris
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Jacobs
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Nedostup
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Vorenberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Conant
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Weinstein
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S16
    Primary Instructor
    McClain
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Richards
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Sacks
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S21
    Primary Instructor
    Hamlin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Spoehr
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Nummedal
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S27
    Primary Instructor
    Green
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S28
    Primary Instructor
    Mandel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S29
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S30
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S31
    Primary Instructor
    Fisher
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S32
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S33
    Primary Instructor
    Castiglione
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S34
    Primary Instructor
    Brummett
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S35
    Primary Instructor
    Doumani
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S36
    Primary Instructor
    Guldi
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S37
    Primary Instructor
    Pollock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S38
    Primary Instructor
    Steinberg
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    HIST 2910 S39
    Primary Instructor
    Rieppel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Colloquium

    Required of all first-year graduate students; includes participation in Thursday Lecture Series. E
    HIST 2930 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Brokaw
  • Historical Crossings: Empires and Modernity

    “Historical crossings” is a rough translation of histoire croisée, referring to global configurations of events and a shared history, rather than to a traditional comparative history. This Seminar is designed to be the cornerstone of the M.A. program. It will not serve as a traditional historical methods course but instead focus on training students to read and think on various scales of historical analysis—from cross-cultural and trans-geographic to the granularity of social and cultural specificity, requiring students to think both globally and locally and introducing them to an advanced level of historical inquiry, debate, and exploration.
    HIST 2935 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Shibusawa
  • Graduate Workshop: The Practice of History

    Required of all incoming Ph.D. students. E
    HIST 2940 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
  • New Perspectives on Medieval History

    Over the past several decades, the field of medieval history has been reshaped radically. New approaches have changed the ways that medievalists think about old subjects. Our understanding of medieval society itself has expanded as previously marginal or unexplored subjects have become central to medievalists' concern. This seminar explores how the ways in which medieval historians practice their craft have altered in response to these developments. Readings in classic older works are juxtaposed with newer ones on their way to becoming classics themselves.
    HIST 2970A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Remensnyder
  • Core Readings in 20th Century United States History

    Major topics and themes in 20th-century U.S. history. M
    HIST 2970Q S01
    Primary Instructor
    Self
  • Topics in 19th c. U.S. History

    This state-of-the-field course will introduce students to nineteenth-century U.S. history, with specific attention to how recent transnational, imperial, institutional, and cultural approaches have reframed older debates over the "Age of Jackson," "Manifest Destiny," and the "Market Revolution." This seminar offers core readings for students preparing a comprehensive exam field, while providing others with content knowledge to teach this period of American history.
    HIST 2971J S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rockman
  • Theory From The South

    The “global south” is a working category today for a diversity of intellectual projects centered on the non-European postcolonial world. While this category is embedded in histories of empire and culture, critical thinking since the 1970s has already done much to “provincialize Europe” and interrogate the ways in which power and knowledge have been imbricated in the making of universal claims, institutional processes and historical self-understanding. This graduate seminar will draw upon lineages of anti-colonial thought and postcolonial critique to relocate and rethink the "south" as a generative source for theory and history.
    HIST 2981I S01
    Primary Instructor
    Zamindar
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    HIST 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep