Current Fellows

A list of current fellows, institutional affiliations, titles of project, names of awards, and duration (in parentheses).

JCB RESEARCH FELLOWS 2014-2015

Long-term (5 to 10 months)

Kathryn Burns, Professor of History, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Relations of Rescate
National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow (9)

Nancy van Deusen, Professor of History, Queen’s University, Canada, “The Disappearance of the Past: Indigenous Slavery in Spanish and Portuguese America, 1492–1560”
InterAmericas Fellow, funded by The Reed Foundation (9)

Bérénice Gaillemin, Independent Scholar, “New Insights into the Three Pictographic Catechisms at the JCB Library” (5)
Donald L. Saunders
Fellow (5) 

Sarah Newman, Ph.D. Candidate in Anthropology, Brown University, “Rethinking Refuse: Maya Trash as Rubbish, Resources, and Ritual”
J.M. Stuart Fellow
(9)

Justin Pope, Lecturer in History, The George Washington University, “Dangerous Spirit of Liberty: Slave Insurrection, Conspiracy, and the First Great Awakening, 1729–1746”
JCB-Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice Postdoctoral Fellow (9)

Michele Reid-Vazquez, Assistant Professor of Africana Studies, University of Pittsburgh, “Caribbean Crossings: Comparative Black Emigration and Freedom in the Age of Revolution”
InterAmericas Fellow, funded by The Reed Foundation / Center for New World Comparative Studies Fellow (5)

Tatiana Seijas, Assistant Professor of History, Miami University, “The Road of Empire: Covering the Distance between Mexico City and Santa Fe, 1540–1850”
R. David Parsons Fellow
(5)

Tanya Tiffany, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Visual Culture and Feminine Devotion in the Early Modern Spanish Empire”
National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow
(9)

Short-term (2 to 4 months)

Laura Bland, Ph.D. Candidate in History of Science, University of Notre Dame, “Unfriendly Skies: The Comet of 1680 in the Spanish and English Empires”
John Carter Brown Library-Grupo de Investigación de Siglo de Oro (GRISO) Fellow (2)

Roberto Chauca Tapia, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Florida, “Science in the Jungle: The Missionary Mapping and National Imagining of Western Amazonia”
Jeannette D. Black Memorial Fellow (2)

Manuel Covo, Lecturer in History, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS, Paris) / Paris X University, France, “Trade, Empire, and Revolutions in the Atlantic World: Saint-Domingue, between the Metropole and the United States (c. 1778 to c. 1804)”
John Carter Brown Library Associates Fellow (3)

Jason (Jake) Frederick, Associate Professor of History, Lawrence University, "Fire and Control in Bourbon Mexico City"
John Carter Brown Library Associates Fellow (2)

David Garrett, Professor of History, Reed College, “Cusco in 1689: Geographies of a Colonial Society”
Alice E. Adams Fellow (3)

Jonathan E. Greenwood, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Johns Hopkins University, “World of Wonders: Jesuit Sanctity, Medical Miracles, and Sacred Material Culture”
Helen Watson Buckner Memorial Fellow (2)

Pedro M. Guibovich Pérez, Professor of History, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, “Authors, Censors, and Books in the Viceroyalty of Peru”
Maria Elena Cassiet Fellow (2)

Kim F. Hall, Lucyle Hook Chair, Professor of English & Africana Studies, Barnard College, “Sweet Taste of Empire: Sugar, Gender and Material Culture in Early Modern England”
Ruth and Lincoln Ekstrom Fellow (2)
 

James L. Hill, Ph.D. Candidate in History, The College of William & Mary, “Muskogee Internationalism in an Age of Revolution, 1763–1818”
Charles H. Watts Memorial Fellow (2)

Mélanie Lamotte, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, "Color Prejudice in the Early Modern French Empire, c. 1635–1767"
Norman Fiering / Jane L. Keddy Memorial Fellow (3)

Jacob Lee, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of California, Davis, “Rivers of Power: Indians and Colonists in the North American Midcontinent”
John Carter Brown Library Associates Fellow (2)

Giuseppe Marcocci, Assistant Professor of History, Dipartimento di Scienze dei Beni Culturali, Università degli Studi della Tuscia, “Writing World History in Renaissance Europe and the Americas (c. 1500–1600)”
John Carter Brown Library Associates Fellow (2)

Patricia A. McAnany, Professor of Anthropology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, “Constructing ‘The Ancient Maya’: Perceptions of Pre-Colonial Heritage in 16th- through 19th- Century Documents from Mexico & Guatemala”
Ruth and Lincoln Ekstrom Fellow (3)

Stuart McManus, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Harvard University, “Globalizing Cicero: Humanist Eloquence in Early Modern European Empires”
Paul W. McQuillen Memorial Fellow (3)

Francesco Morriello, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, “Messengers of Empire: The Impact of the French Revolutionary Period on British and French Communication Networks in the Atlantic World, 1763–1804”
Virginia and Jean R. Perrette Fellow (2)

Melissa Morris, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Columbia University, "Cultivating Colonies: Tobacco and the Upstart Empires, 1580–1640"
Center for New World Comparative Studies Fellow (2)

Roxana Nakashima, Independent Scholar, “Galleys in the Caribbean Sea during the XVIth Century: A Failed Experiment of a Mediterranean Success”
Alexander O. Vietor Memorial Fellow (2)

Katherine A. Parker, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Pittsburgh, “Toward a More ‘perfect knowledge’: British Geographic Knowledge and South Seas Exploration in the Eighteenth-Century”
John R. Bockstoce Fellow (2)

Jorun Poettering, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in History, Harvard University, “Contested Waters: Rio de Janeiro’s Public Water Supply and the Social Structuring of the City (1565 – ca. 1870)”
Norman Fiering / Almeida Family Fellow (3)

Christina Ramos, Ph.D. Candidate in History of Science, Harvard University, “Bedlam in the New World: Madness, Colonialism, and a Mexican Madhouse, 1567–1821”
José Amor Y Vázquez
Fellow (2)

Ahmed Reid, Assistant Professor of History, Bronx Community College of the City University of New York, “Slavery and Economic Growth in the Age of Abolition, 1780–1807”
Norman Fiering / Helen Watson Buckner Memorial Fellow (3)

Jennifer Saracino, Ph.D. Candidate in Art History, Tulane University, “Sources of Meaning: Reconstructing the Formation of Mexico-Tenochtitlan’s Visual Culture through Books and Prints”
Jeannette D. Black Memorial Fellow (2)

Cameron Shriver, Ph.D. Candidate in History, Ohio State University, “Village to Nation:  Rethinking American Indian Political Culture in the Great Lakes, 1750–1850”
Paul W. McQuillen Memorial Fellow (2)

Mark Somos, Lecturer on Law, Harvard University, “Free to Conquer: The Parallel Constitutions of Early Modern Dutch Identity and Imperialism”
John Carter Brown Library Associates Fellow (2)

Manuel Suárez Rivera, Postdoctoral Researcher, Institute of Geography, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) “A Successful Editorial Genre: Use and Strategies of Almanacs in Spanish America at the End of the 18th-Century”
Maria Elena Cassiet Fellow (3)

Vanina María Teglia, Assistant Professor of Latin American Literature, Universidad de Buenos Aires; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Argentina, “The Marvelous Elements in the Nature of the New World: First Colonial Discourse of the Indies”
John Carter Brown Library-Grupo de Investigación de Siglo de Oro (GRISO) Fellow (2)

Yevan (Erwan) Terrien, Ph.D. Candidate in History, University of Pittsburgh, “Exiles and Fugitives: Mobility, Labor, and Power in Early Louisiana (ca. 1700–1810)”
Marie L. and William R. Hartland Fellow (2)

Jeffrey Thomson, Associate Professor of Creative Writing, University of Maine at Farmington, “Self-Portrait in Nine Generations”
Hodson Trust-John Carter Brown Library Fellow

Emily (Amy) Torbert, Ph.D. Candidate in Art History, University of Delaware, “Going Places: The Material and Imaginary Geographies of Prints in the Atlantic World, 1770–1840”
Jeannette D. Black Memorial Fellow (2)

Joanne van der Woude, Assistant Professor of American Studies, University of Groningen, The Netherlands, “No More Heroes: Violence and Resistance in New World Poetry”
Charles H. Watts Memorial Fellow (2)

Stijn van Rossem, Ph.D. Candidate in Information and Library Sciences, University of Antwerp, Belgium, “Netherlandish Publishers and their Editorial Strategies in the International Book Trade (17th- and 18th- Centuries)”
Reese
/ John Alden Memorial Fellow (4)

Nathan Wachtel, Professor Emeritus of History and Anthropology, Collège de France, “Anthology of Texts and Documents Regarding Indians of the Americas (late 15th- to early 20th-Centuries)”
Maury A. Bromsen Memorial Fellow (4)