Faculty Profile: Adam Chodobski, PHD

Adam Chodobski
Adam Chodobski, PHD
Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine; Director of Neurotrauma and Brain Barriers Research
Emergency Medicine
Work: +1 401-444-4285
I am interested in the function of the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers in the context of brain injury and aging. Traumatic brain injury is the leading cause of death of young Americans, but the incidence of brain injury is also high in the elderly. In my laboratory, we investigate how neuropeptides, growth factors, and cytokines affect the function of brain barriers in the injured central nervous system, and how these changes in the barriers' function depend on age.
You can learn more about my research and visit my lab by going to the following address http://intra.lifespan.org/emergencymedresearch/Neurotrauma/index.html

Biography

I was born in Warsaw, Poland and received a Master's Degree in biomedical engineering from the Polytechnic University in Warsaw. I continued with doctorate studies at the Medical School of Warsaw where I received a Ph.D. in neuroscience. I then pursued post-doctoral training at the Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology and Medicine in Melbourne, Australia. I joined the faculty of Brown University Medical School in 1995. I am currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine.

Institutions

Rih

Research Description

Maintaining the homeostasis of the brain microenvironment is essential for proper neuronal function. This homeostasis is maintained, in large part, thanks to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). The endothelium of brain capillaries forms the BBB, whereas the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus constitute the BCSFB. The function and integrity of these barriers are affected in various CNS disorders (such as ischemia, trauma, neurodegenerative diseases) and cancer, which has an important impact on the progression of these CNS disorders and on the efficacy of potential therapies.

I am interested in the function of the BBB and BCSFB in the context of brain injury and aging. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death of young Americans, accounting for around 100,000 fatalities each year. TBI is usually accompanied by cerebral edema, a life-threatening condition characterized by excessive brain swelling. Despite the importance of this medical condition, very limited progress has been made in the past decades in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying edema formation, which has resulted in a paucity of effective therapies available for clinical use. Brain barriers control the movement of blood-borne molecules and inflammatory cells into the CNS, and the dysfunction of these barriers plays an important role in the formation of post-traumatic brain edema. In my laboratory, we investigate how neuropeptides, growth factors, and cytokines affect the function of brain barriers in the injured CNS. This research is aimed at finding new therapeutic approaches for cerebral edema.

Another aspect of our research is to understand how and why the function of the BBB and BCSFB changes in advanced age. Although TBI is most prevalent in the youth population, the incidence of brain injury is also high in the elderly. The outcome in the elderly population is usually worse, compared to young patients, with prolonged recovery and permanent neurological deficits. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well characterized. Our studies focus on defining the age-related factors that cause the dysfunction of brain barriers and on identifying potential targets for effective TBI treatment in the elderly.

Grants and Awards

The Ministry of Health Prize for Outstanding Research, 1986
"Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation in Hyperammonemia"

Brown University Honorary Master's Degree, 2002

Affiliations

National Neurotrauma Society, 2000 to present
Society for Neuroscience, 1991 to present
New York Academy of Sciences, 1991 to present
American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 1992 to present

Funded Research

ACTIVE SUPPORT

  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grant (R01): 2005–2009
    "Role of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Choroid Plexus in VP-Mediated Edema"
    Role: Principal Investigator; $1,515,659.

  • NIH Grant (R01): 2006–2010
    "Age-Related Decrease in A-beta Clearance Pathways: CSF and
    Blood-Brain Barrier"
    Role: Collaborator; $1,510,395.

PREVIOUSLY AWARDED
  • NIH Grant (R01): 2000–2004
    "Extrahypothalamic AVP: Synthesis and Secretion"
    Role: Principal Investigator

  • National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant: 1998–2000
    "Choroid Plexus: A Newly Discovered Site for Central Vasopressin
    Biosynthesis"
    Role: Principal Investigator

  • Rhode Island Hospital Research Development Grant: 1994–1995
    "Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Choroid Plexus"
    Role: Principal Investigator

  • Rhode Island Foundation Research Grant: 1992–1993
    "The Role of Angiotensin II in the Regulation of Blood Flow to the
    Choroid Plexus"
    Role: Principal Investigator

  • The Wellcome Trust Research Grant: 1990–1991
    "The Role of Neuropeptides in the Regulation of Blood Flow to the
    Choroid Plexus"
    Role: Principal Investigator

  • Medical Academy of Warsaw Research Grant: 1990–1991
    "The Role of Centrally-Released Angiotensin II in the Regulation of
    Cerebrospinal Fluid Formation"
    Role: Principal Investigator

Teaching Experience

• Trainer in the Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology Graduate
Program

• Mentor to undergraduate students and supervisor of independent
student projects BI0195 and BI0196

• Mentor and adviser to residents in the Neurosurgery Program at Brown
University Medical School

• Adviser and reader for Honors and Master's Theses

Courses Taught

  • Independent Research (BI0195)