Faculty Profile: Anne Fausto-Sterling, Ph. D.

Anne Fausto-Sterling
Anne Fausto-Sterling, Ph. D.
Professor of Biology
Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, & Biochemistry
Work: +1 401-863-2109
Professor Fausto-Sterling's work applies dynamic systems theory to the study of human development. Newspapers are awash with reports of genes for this or that complex human trait (obesity, alcoholism, homosexuality, gender differences in math and science). A great divide exists between people who accept biological explanations of human difference and those who reject biology in favor of social explanations. Her big ambition is to restructure dichotomous conversations--inside the academy, in public discourse, and ultimately in the framing of social policy--in order to enable an understanding of the inseparability of nature/nurture.

Biography

Anne Fausto-Sterling is the Nancy Duke Lewis Professor of Biology and Gender Studies in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and Biochemistry at Brown University. She is Chair of the Faculty Committee on Science & Technology Studies.

In addition to having served on the Brown faculty for more than 40 years, Anne Fausto-Sterling has been a visiting professor at a number of institutions in the US and abroad in departments of Biology, Medical Science, Gender Studies and Science Studies. A Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, she has received grants and fellowships in both the sciences and the humanities.

Author of scientific publications in developmental genetics, gender studies and science studies, Professor. Fausto-Sterling has achieved recognition for works that challenge entrenched scientific beliefs while engaging with the general public.

Professor Fausto-Sterling's past laboratory work has included studies of the genetics of development in fruit flies and the developmental ecology of flatworms. Her current work applies dynamic systems theory to the study of human development. Professor Fausto-Sterling's current case studies examine sex differences in bone development, the emergence of gender differences in behavior in early childhood and the emergence of human sexuality.

A more detailed biography may be found in the Sept. 2005 issue of Current Biography or by clicking on the link under "On the Web" on this web site.

Institutions

Bu

Research Description

Professor Fausto-Sterling is applying dynamic systems theory to the study of human development. Newspapers are awash with reports of genes for this or that complex human trait (obesity, alcoholism, homosexuality, gender differences in math and science). A great divide exists between people who accept biological explanations of human difference and those who reject biology in favor of social explanations. My big ambition is to restructure dichotomous conversations--inside the academy, in public discourse, and ultimately in the framing of social policy--in order to enable an understanding of the inseparability of nature/nurture. Dynamic systems theory permits us to understand how cultural difference becomes bodily difference. Professor Fausto-Sterling's current case studies in this area examine sex differences in bone development and the emergence of gender differences in behavior in early childhood.

Grants and Awards

Please check my CV and annefaustosterling.com for this information

Affiliations

Please check my CV and annefaustosterling.com for this information

Funded Research

1972-1974 General Research Support Grant from Brown University, "Oogenesis and the Control of Early Embryogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster". $10,000

1974-1977 National Science Foundation Grant No. BMS-19691, "Control of Embryogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster." $30,000

1974-1977 National Foundation--March of Dimes: Basil O'Connor Starter Research Grant, "Studies of a Eukaryote Model for Orotic Aciduria." $46,137

1975-1978 National Institutes of Health Grant No. HD-07918, "Control of Embryogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster." Total Direct Costs: $79,267

1977-1979 National Foundation--March of Dimes, "A Eukaryotic Model for the Analysis of Pyrimidine Biosynthesis." $36,000

1978-1980 National Science Foundation, "Control of Embryogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster." $84,000

1980-1984 National Science Foundation "Cellular adhesivity and the determined state of imaginal discs of Drosophila melanogaster." $55,000 for year 1; $60,000 for year 2; $65,000 for year 3

1981 Summer supplement to NSF for salary and travel for Dr. Florian Muckenthaler, Visiting Professor in my laboratory. ($12,000)

1984-1987 National Science Foundation, "Cellular adhesivity and the determined state of imaginal discs of Drosophila melanogaster." $155,000 for 2 ½ years.

1988-1989 Bio-Med Research Support Grant, "A New Look at Planarian Development." $6,000

1989-1990 Bio-Med Research Support Grant, "Genetic Control of Planarian Regeneration." $1,600

1990-1992 Hughes Foundation Grant for planarian research. $5,000

1991 Biology Research Support Grant, "The Evolution of Sexuality in Planaria" (with D. Rand, A. Schmitt, and L. Brooks). $7,000

1992 National Science Foundation--History of Science. "Dissecting Black Women: Biologists' Accounts of Race and Gender in the 19th Century". $50,000

1999-2000 Social Science Research Foundation, from the Sexuality Research Fellowship Program, "An Unexplored Country: American Sex Research and the Rise of the Survey, 1900-1948" (with Miriam Reumann, Ph.D.). $44,000

2004 Brown University Wayland Collegium support for a 2-day roundtable in the fall of 2004 on "Understanding Sexual differentiation: A New Paradigm for Psychology". $5,000

2004 Marshall Woods Lectureships Foundation of Fine Arts award (Brown University Lectureship Funds) for "Race and the Human Genome". $5,000

2004 Ford Foundation Grant (via the Pembroke Center) for roundtable on the topic of "Understanding Sexual Differentiation in Human Development" $25,000

2005 The Pembroke Center for Research on "The Emergence of Difference in Early Child Development". $20,000 for one year

2006-2010 The Ford Foundation, "A dynamic systems approach to the emergence of sex-related differences in infancy". $60,000.

Teaching Experience

Professor Fausto-Sterling has taught courses in developmental biology and in science and technology studies. She also directs the Science and Society Concentration and advises students in this major.

Selected Publications

  • Publications are listed and available for download on annefaustosterling.com ()