Faculty Profile: Bernadine Pinto

Bernadine Pinto
Bernadine Pinto
Professor of Psychiatry/Human Behavior (Research)
Bio Med Psychiatry & Human Behavior
Work: +1 401-793-8230
Bernardine Pinto's research interests have focused in two areas: 1) changing unhealthy behaviors, and 2) psycho-social issues and health behavior change among oncology patients. Her research focus is on exercise promotion and cancer survivorship, and she has published over 50 original articles and book chapters. She has received funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), American Cancer Society, and the Lance Armstrong Foundation for intervention trials to promote exercise among sedentary adults and among cancer survivors.

Research Description

Bernardine Pinto, Ph.D., is a Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown Medical School and The Miriam Hospital. Her research interests have focused in two areas: 1) changing unhealthy behaviors, particularly sedentary lifestyle among adults using physician-based, computer-driven, and home-based intervention channels; and 2) psycho-social issues and health behavior change among oncology patients. She is one of a handful of researchers who has examined the role of health behaviors among cancer survivors. She has developed a systematic body of research that includes cross-sectional, longitudinal assessment studies and intervention trials. She is active in the training of interns and postdoctoral fellows and is the chair of the Diversity Committee in the Brown University Clinical Psychology Consortium.

Bernadine Pinto's current research includes:

1) Physical Activity Promotion in Cancer Follow-Up Care
Bernardine Pinto, Ph.D. (PI)
Funding agency: American Cancer Society
This study, funded by the American Cancer Society, aims at testing the efficacy of a physical activity intervention in an outpatient oncology setting. Using a randomized controlled design, Brief Advice for physical activity (M.D. advice plus contact control) will be compared to Extended Advice (M.D. advice plus telephone-based counseling by research staff) over three months among 300 women who have completed treatment for breast cancer. Outcomes include physical activity behavior, mood, fatigue, and body esteem assessed at three, six, and 12 months. If the data are promising, the study lays the groundwork for improving cancer recovery by integrating a brief physical activity intervention into follow-up care for cancer survivors.

2) Translating Research-based Physical Activity Promotion among Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study
Bernardine Pinto, Ph.D. (P.I.)
Funding Agency: Lance Armstrong Foundation
Research studies have demonstrated that physical activity adoption among cancer survivors can improve their physical functioning, quality of life, mood, and fatigue. As a first step towards translating these efforts into a community setting, this study will examine the feasibility and effects of a telephone-based physical activity program offered by community volunteers (Reach to Recovery volunteers of the local office of the American Cancer Society) to breast cancer survivors. This pilot study represents efforts to extend the research on physical activity to the community setting by having community volunteers be the channel of intervention delivery, thereby making physical activity interventions much more accessible to survivors.

3) Maintaining Exercise after Cardiac Rehabilitation
Bernardine Pinto, Ph.D. (PI)
Funding Agency: National Heart, Lung, Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Maintaining exercise participation among patients who have completed cardiac rehabilitation is integral to secondary prevention of coronary events and cardiac re-hospitalization. Patients in Phase II cardiac rehabilitation programs, a majority being older adults, participate in regular supervised exercise during the program; however, long-term adherence to exercise is poor, with only 30% reporting regular exercise at 12-month follow-ups. To promote exercise maintenance after completion of a 12-week Phase II rehabilitation program, we propose to offer a theoretically based intervention that we have used successfully to promote exercise among older, primary-care patients. This program (Maintenance Counseling) includes brief advice from the Cardiac Rehabilitation case manager at Phase II program discharge followed by telephone counseling based on the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change and Social Cognitive Theory. Health educators will provide the telephone-based intervention over six months. Using a randomized controlled design, 180 patients will be assigned to Maintenance Counseling or Brief Advice plus Contact Control. Outcome assessments will include an exercise tolerance test (baseline/post-rehabilitation and six months), self-reported exercise participation, motivational readiness for exercise, and objective activity monitoring at baseline, six, and 12 months. These data will help to identify whether telephone-based exercise counseling is an effective strategy for sustaining regular exercise and fitness among cardiac rehabilitation patients thereby contributing to secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.

4) Promoting Physical Activity after Colorectal Cancer
Bernardine Pinto, Ph.D. (PI)
Funding Agency: National Cancer Institute (NCI)

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the U.S. and if detected early, has a favorable prognosis. Colorectal cancer survivors face many physical and psychosocial sequelae including second cancers, adverse effects on major organs, cognitive, and sexual function, problems in work and social roles, and reduced quality of life. Following adjuvant treatments (chemotherapy and/or radiation), these individuals may be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, obesity, osteoporosis and future cancers. There is growing evidence that moderate-intensity physical activity can improve physical functioning, reduce fatigue, enhance vigor, and improve body esteem among those treated for breast cancer. Colorectal cancer survivors report increased fatigue, low vigor, impaired physical functioning, and disturbances in body esteem. However, the group is relatively understudied and the potential benefits of increased physical activity to their recovery have not been examined. This study focuses on enhancing recovery by offering a home-based physical activity program to patients who have completed treatment for colorectal cancer. The program, based on our prior work among breast cancer survivors, consists of telephone–delivered physical activity counseling over three months. The counseling is based on the Transtheoretical Model, Social Cognitive Theory, and elements of Motivational Interviewing. This study will test the efficacy of the physical activity intervention using a randomized controlled design among 134 patients who have completed treatment for colorectal cancer in the past two years. Outcomes will include physical activity behavior, fitness, vigor, fatigue, physical functioning, and body esteem among participants at baseline, three, six and 12 months (post-treatment). We will also track intervention costs and conduct exploratory analyses of moderators and mediators of change to help guide the future development of physical activity interventions to enhance recovery from colorectal cancer.

Grants and Awards

Bruce Selya Award for Research Excellence, Lifespan 2000.

Citation paper, "Physical Activity Promotion Using a Computer-based Telephone Counseling System", The Society of Behavioral Medicine, April 2000.

Keynote address: Role of Exercise in the Recovery from Breast Cancer, Ninth Annual Research Celebration, Lifespan Academic Medical Center, RI. October, 2001.

Invited Presentation: Pinto, B.M. and Trunzo, J.J. Health behaviors during and after cancer. National Cancer Institute and American Cancer Society's Biennial Cancer Survivorship Conference, Washington, DC. June, 2002.

Invited Presentation: Exercise in the recovery from breast cancer. Presented at the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Sixth Annual Research Symposium on Mental Health Sciences, Brown Medical School, Providence, RI. March, 2002.

Chair, Diversity Recruitment, Brown University Clinical Psychology Consortium.

Award for Excellence in Diversity Training, Association of Psychology, Post-Doctoral, and Internship Centers, 2003.

Citation paper: Moving Forward: A randomized trial of a home-based physical activity program for breast cancer patients. Annual Meeting of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, March 2003.

Citation paper: Home-based physical activity for breast cancer patients: Effects at follow-ups, Annual Meeting of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Baltimore, MD, March 2004.

Citation paper: Physician-delivered activity advice plus extended counseling for older adults (PAL2), Annual Meeting of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Baltimore, MD, March 2004.

Invited keynote speaker: Health behavior change interventions among cancer patients. 7th World Congress of Psychosocial-Oncology, Copenhagen, Denmark. August 2004.

Affiliations

American Psychological Association
American Public Health Association
Society of Behavioral Medicine (Fellow status as of March 2006)

Funded Research

1) Physical Activity Promotion in Cancer Follow-Up Care
Bernardine Pinto, Ph.D. (PI)
Funding agency: American Cancer Society

2) Translating Research-based Physical Activity Promotion among Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study
Bernardine Pinto, Ph.D. (P.I.)
Funding Agency: Lance Armstrong Foundation

3) Maintaining Exercise after Cardiac Rehabilitation
Bernardine Pinto, Ph.D. (PI)
Funding Agency: National Heart, Lung, Blood Institute (NHLBI)

4) Promoting Physical Activity after Colorectal Cancer
Bernardine Pinto, Ph.D. (PI)
Funding Agency: National Cancer Institute (NCI)

Selected Publications

  • Pinto, B.M., Trunzo, J.J., Rabin, C., Cady, B., Fenton, M., Herman, A., Legare, R. & Sikov, W. (in press). Recruitment strategies for a home-based physical activity intervention for breast cancer patients. Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings. (IN PRESS)
  • Sciamanna, C. N., Goldstein, M. G., Marcus, B. H., Kipp, L. & Pinto, B. M. (in press). Accuracy of recall of exercise counseling among primary care patients. Preventive Medicine. (IN PRESS)
  • Pinto, B. M. & Trunzo, J. J. (2004). Body esteem and mood among breast cancer survivors: Sedentary vs. regular exercisers. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 79, 181-186. (2004)
  • Trunzo, J. J. & Pinto, B. M. (2003). Social support as a mediator of optimism and distress in breast cancer survivors. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 71, 805-811. (2003)
  • Pinto, B. M., Clark, M. M., Maruyama, N. C., & Feder, S. I. (2003). Psychological and fitness changes associated with exercise participation among women with breast cancer. Psycho-Oncology, 12, 118-126. (2003)
  • Glanz, K., Shigaki, D., Farzanfar, R., Pinto, B.M., Kaplan, B., Friedman, R.H. (2003). Participant reactions to a computerized telephone system for nutrition and exercise counseling. Patient Education and Counseling, 49, 157-163. (2003)
  • Pinto, B. M., Friedman, R., Marcus, B. H., Kelley, H., Tennstedt, S., & Gillman, M. (2002). Effects of a computer-based counseling system on physical activity. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 23, 113-120. (2002)
  • Marcus, B. H., Bock, B. C., Pinto, B. M., Napolitano, M. A., & Clark, M. M. (2002). Exercise initiation, adoption and maintenance in adults: Theoretical models and empirical support. In J. L. Van Raalte & B. W. Brewer (Eds.), A practitioner's guide to sport and exercise psychology (2nd ed., pp. 185-208). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. (2002)
  • King, A. C., Friedman, R., Marcus, B. H., Castro, C., Forsyth, L., Napolitano, M. A., & Pinto, B. M. (2002). Harnessing motivational forces in the promotion of physical activity: The Community Health Advice by Telephone (CHAT) Project. Health Education Research, 17, 627-636. (2002)
  • Borrelli, B., Hogan, J., Bock, B. C., Pinto, B. M., Roberts, M., & Marcus, B. H. (2002). Predictors of quitting and dropout among women in a clinic-based smoking cessation program. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 16, 22-27. (2002)
  • Pinto, B. M., Trunzo, J. J., Reiss, P., & Shiu, S. (2002). Exercise participation after diagnosis of breast cancer: Trends and effects on mood and quality of life. Psycho-Oncology, 11, 389-400. (2002)
  • Pinto, B. M., Clark, M. M., Maruyama, N. C., Cruess, D., Park, E., & Roberts, M. (2002). Motivation of women treated for breast cancer to change lifestyle risk factors. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 77, 122-129. (2002)
  • Pinto, B. M., Lynn, H., Marcus, B. H., DePue, J. D., & Goldstein, M. G. (2001). Physician-based activity counseling: Intervention effects on mediators of motivational readiness for physical activity. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 23, 2-10. (2001)
  • Selected publications from more then 150 2007 Marcus, B. H., Napolitano, M. A., Lewis, B. A., King, A. C., Whiteley, J. A., Albrecht, A. E.,Parisi, A. F., Pinto, B. M., Bock, B. C., Sciamanna, C. A., Jakicic, J. M., & Papandonatos, G. D. (2007). Examination of print and telephone channels for physical activity promotion: Rationale, design, and baseline data from project STRIDE. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 28(1), 90-104. Marcus, B. H., Lewis, B. A., Williams, D. M., Dunsiger, S. I., Jakicic, J. M., Whiteley J.A., Albrecht A. E., Napolitano M.A., Bock, B. C., Tate, D. F., Sciamanna C.A., & Parisi, A. F. (2007). A comparison of Internet and print-based physical activity interventions. Archives of Internal Medicine, 167(9), 944-949. Marcus, B. H., Napolitano, M. A., King, A. C., Lewis, B. A., Whiteley, J. A., Albrecht, A. E., Parisi, A. F., Bock, B. C., Pinto, B. M., Sciamanna, C., Jakicic, J. M., & Papandonatos, G. D. (2007). Telephone versus print delivery of an individualized motivationally-tailored physical activity intervention: Project STRIDE. Health Psychology, 26(4), 401-409. Plotnikoff , R. C., Brunet, S., Courneya, K. S., Spence, J. C., Birkett, N. J., Marcus, B. H., Whiteley, J. (2007). The efficacy of stage-matched and standard public health materials for promoting physical activity in the workplace: The physical activity workplace study (PAWS). American Journal of Health Promotion, 21(6), 501-509. Sevick , M., Napolitano, M. A., Papandonatos, G. D., Gordon , A. J., Reiser , L. M., Marcus, B.H. (2007). Cost-effectiveness of alternative approaches for motivating activity in sedentary adults: Results of Project STRIDE. Preventive Medicine, 45(1), 54-61. Marcus, B. H., Lewis, B.A., Williams, D.M., Whiteley, J. A., Albrecht, A. E., Jakicic, J. M., Parisi, A. F., Hogan, J. W., Napolitano, M. A., & Bock, B. C. (2007). Step into Motion: A randomized trial examining the relative efficacy of Internet vs. print-based physical activity interventions. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 28:737-747. King, A.C., Friedman, R.H., Marcus, B. H., Castro, C., Napolitano, M., Ahn, D., & Baker, L. (2007). Ongoing physical activity advice by humans versus computers: The Community Health Advice by Telephone (CHAT) Trial. Health Psychology, 26(6), 718-727. Neighbors, C. J., Marquez, D. X., & Marcus, B.H. (2007). Leisure time physical activity disparities among Latino subgroups in the United States. American Journal of Public Health, 98(1),12-16. Whiteley, J.A., Napolitano, M.A., Lewis, B.A., Williams, D.M., Albrecht, A.E., Neighbors, C.J., Sciamanna, C.N., & Marcus, B.H. (2007). Commit to quit in the YMCAs:Translating an evidence based quit smoking program for women into a community setting. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 9(11), 1227-1235. 2008 Williams, D. M., Dunsiger, S. I., Ciccolo, J., Lewis, B. A., Albrecht, A., Marcus, B. H. (2008). Acute affective response to a moderate intensity exercise stimulus predicts physical activity participation 6 and 12 months later. Journal of Sports and Exercise Psychology, 9:231-245. PMC2390920 Williams, D.M., Lewis, B.A., Dunsiger, S., King, T.K., Jennings, E., & Marcus, B.H. (2008). Increasing fitness is associated with fewer depressive symptoms during successful smoking abstinence among women. International Journal of Fitness, 4(1), 39-44. 129. Dutton, G. R., Napolitano, M. A., Whiteley, J.A., & Marcus, B.H. (2008). Is physical activity a gateway behavior for diet? Findings from a physical activity trial. Preventive Medicine, 46(3), 216-221. Garber, C. E., Allsworth, J. E., Marcus, B. H., Hesser, J., & Lapane, K. L. (2008). Correlates of the stages of change for physical activity in a population survey. American Journal of Public Health, 98(5), 897-904 131. Williams, D.M., Matthews C., Rutt, C., Napolitano, M.A., & Marcus, B.H. (2008). Interventions to increase walking behavior. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 7S, 567-573. PMC2694671 Jakicic J.M., Marcus B.H., Lang W., & Janney C. (2008). Effect of exercise on 24-Month Weight Loss Maintenance in Overweight Women. Archives of Internal Medicine, 168 (14), 1550-1559. Roy J, Hogan JW, Marcus B.H. (2008). Principal stratification with predictors of compliance for randomized trials with two active treatments. Biostatistics, 9(2):277-89. Napolitano, M. A., Papandonatos, G.D., Lewis, B.A., Whiteley, J.A., Williams, D.M., King, A. C., Bock, B.C., Pinto, B., & Marcus, B.H. (2008). Mediators of physical activity behavior change: A multivariate approach. Health Psychology, 27(4):409-18. PMC2692944 Ussher, M., Aveyard, T., Coleman, T., Straus, L., West, R., Marcus, B., Lewis, B., Manyonda, I. (2008). Physical activity as an aid to smoking cessation during pregnancy: two feasibility studies. BioMed Central Public Health. Sept 27(8):328. Williams, D.M., Lewis, B.A., Dunsiger, S., Whiteley, J.A., Papandonatos, G.D., Napolitano, M.A., Bock, B.C., Ciccolo, J.T., & Marcus, B.H. (2008). Comparing psychosocial predictors of physical activity adoption and maintenance. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Oct.36 (2):186-194. PMC2721457 Pinto, B.M., Rabin C., Papandonatos, G.D., Frierson, G.M., Trunzo, JJ, & Marcus, B.H. (2008). Maintenance of effects of a home-based physical activity program among breast cancer survivors. Support Care Cancer. Nov;16(11):1279-89. Frierson, G., Williams, D.M., Dunsiger, B., Lewis, B.A., Whiteley J.A., Albrecht, A.E., Jakicic, J.M., Horowitz, S.M., Marcus, B.H. (2008). Recruitment of a racially and ethnically diverse sample into a physical activity efficacy trial. Clinical Trials. 5(5):504-16. PMC2709781. Lewis, B.A., Williams, D., Dunsiger, S., Sciamanna, C., Whiteley, J., Napolitano, M., Bock, B., Jakicic, J., Getz, M., & Marcus, B. (2008). User attitudes towards physical activity websites in a randomized controlled trial. Preventive Medicine. 47(5):508-13. Ciccolo, J.T., Lewis, B., & Marcus, B.H. (2008). Internet-Based Physical Activity Interventions. Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports. 2:299-304 2009 Pekmezi, D., Jennings, E., & Marcus, B.H. (2009). Evaluating and enhancing self-efficacy for physical activity. ACSM'S Health & Fitness Journal. 13(2):16-21. Marcus, B.H., Ciccolo, J.T., & Sciamanna, C.N. (2009). Using electronic/computer- based interventions to promote physical activity. British Journal of Sports Medicine 43:102-105. Chasan-Taber, L., Marcus, B.H., Stanek III, E., Ciccolo, J.T., Marquez, D.X., Solomon, J., & Markenson, G. A. (2009) A Randomized controlled trial of prenatal physical activity to prevent gestational diabetes: Design and methods. Journal of Women's Health, 18(6), 851-859. Brown, R.A.,Abrantes, A.M., Read, J.P., Marcus, B.H., Jakicic, J., Strong, D.R., Oakley, J.R., Ramsey, S.E., Kahler, C.W., Stuart, G.G., Dubreuil, M.E. & Gordon, A.A. (2009). Aerobic exercise for alcohol recovery: rationale, program description, and preliminary findings. Behavior Modification. 33(2):220-249 Vickers, K.S., Patten, C.A., Lewis, B.A., Clark, M.M., Ussher, M., Ebbert, J.O., Croghan, I.T., Decker, P.A.,Hathaway, M.S., Marcus, B.H., & Hurt, R.D. (2009). Feasibility of an exercise counseling intervention for depressed women smokers. Nicotine & Tobacco Research. 11(8):985-995. (2001)
  • Delichatsios, H. K., Friedman, R. H., Glanz, K., Tennstedt, S., Smigelski, C., Pinto, B. M., Kelley, H., & Gillman, M. W. (2001). Randomized trial of a "talking computer" to improve adults' eating habits. American Journal of Health Promotion, 15, 215-224. (2001)
  • Bock, B. C., Marcus, B. H., Pinto, B. M., & Forsyth, L. (2001). Maintenance of physical activity following an individualized motivationally tailored intervention. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 23, 79-87. (2001)
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