Blog

Unpacking the Umbrella Movement: Brown Public Humanities in Hong Kong

Umbrella Movement:

For the past several years, the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage has developed a collaborative relationship with the Chinese University of Hong Kong Program in Cultural Management, primarily focused on building institutional support for public humanities. This year, noting the urgency of protests for democracy—commonly referred to as "The Umbrella Movement"—this collaboration focused on the role of public art in the recent democracy movement.

(Distributed March 5, 2015)

Diedrick and Kerker, M.A. '15: Democratizing Oral History with "Is This Home?"

Help! Foreclosure!:

 

Activist communities, consumed by the present, often forget to take time to look back to their past struggles and successes in order to inform their strategic choices. At the same time, social movement oral histories languish--unknown and untapped--in archives.

Is This Home?” is an experiment in using new media to bridge this divide. 

(Distributed February 23, 2015)

Christina Bevilacqua, Center Fellow: Salons in the 21st Century

I was recently alerted to a long-time Athenaeum salon attendee’s analysis of the evolution of the salons during the time that he has attended. He described the early salons as small, intimate gatherings of people who asked thought-provoking questions in the course of substantive, robust conversations, and those in attendance were able to form close relationships.

(Distributed February 4, 2015)

Laura Mitchell, MA '15: "In Residence on the Commuter Rail"

A Writer Reads on the Commuter Rail:

If you have a commuting routine - especially one that involves public transit - your weekday mornings are probably ruled by patterns: the alarm clock goes off, you make coffee, you head to the train station, you sit down in your usual seat and put your earbuds in. But how often do you think about these patterns, or about the people you’re sharing space with on a daily basis as you make your way to work?

(Distributed December 29, 2014)
Syndicate content Subscribe via RSS feed

Public Humanities Events

Spotlight