Pre-College Programs
Brown Environmental Leadership Lab: New Orleans & Louisiana Gulf Coast

Kayaking through Louisiana salt marshes

Brown Environmental Leadership Lab: New Orleans & Louisiana Gulf Coast

Louisiana is losing a football field of wetlands every hour.

Brown Environmental Leadership Lab: New Orleans & Louisiana Gulf Coast

Efforts to prevent coastal erosion along the Gulf of Mexico.

Brown Environmental Leadership Lab: New Orleans & Louisiana Gulf Coast

The Lower Ninth Ward, an area of New Orleans struggling to rebuild after Hurricane Katrina.

Brown Environmental Leadership Lab: New Orleans & Louisiana Gulf Coast

Students will see Make It Right Foundation sustainable homes under construction in the Lower Ninth Ward.

Brown Environmental Leadership Lab: New Orleans & Louisiana Gulf Coast

The town of Cocodrie, as seen from the LUMCON Marine Center, where students will stay for the second half of the program.

Brown Environmental Leadership Lab: New Orleans & Louisiana Gulf Coast: Program Details

Ecology, Culture, and Sustainable Development for High School Students

Students planting beachgrass on Grand Isle.

In partnership with The Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, Brown offers this rigorous academic program for pre-college students with interests in science, leadership, and cultural studies. Together, we will educate students about conservation, restoration, and protection efforts in Louisiana.

Almost a hundred years ago, for the purposes of navigation and flood control, citizens and the government began to levee the Mississippi River, preventing overtopping and the deposition of valuable sediments replenishing the delta. In the mid-century, oil and gas exploration cut canals through the marsh exposing freshwater marshes to the salty waters of the Gulf while oil and gas extraction increased rates of subsidence (land loss). Climate change has caused sea levels to rise, virtually swallowing marshes and making tropical storms more severe. Undoing the past and righting the future in the face of both natural and man-made disasters means bold action must be taken.

The Mississippi River Delta ecosystem provides at least $12-47 billion in benefits to people annually. For $50 billion over the next fifty years, we could restore this vital system, but Louisiana must still prepare for a changing future. It cannot be restored to any point in the past however, and coastal Louisiana must prepare for a changing future. Diverting water from the river back into the marsh will mean transitions for fisheries, vegetation, and humans. Hardening of structures and floodproofing homes are necessary but not enough. Not every community will receive structural protection; some will move while others will adapt to annual flooding. Resources for this effort are limited and decision-makers face difficult choices.

Students will enroll in BELL: New Orleans & Louisiana Gulf Coast (CRN: 30001)

In this course, students will:

Your program fee includes:

Your Program fee does not include: