Announcements

19 Dec, '13—9:30 am

Google updated its look recently, changing the top menu bar. We've gotten a lot of questions about how to find some apps and features. Here's where to look:

Finding Apps
Previously, you could access Google's apps (such as Mail, Calendar, Contacts, Drive) on the black bar across the top. Now, click the grid icon near the top right of the page and a menu of apps will appear.

Access all AppsAccess all Apps

Shared Mailboxes and Signing Out
Click your photo / icon on the top right to see your shared mailboxes and to sign out.

Access Shared Mailboxes and Sign OutAccess Shared Mailboxes and Sign Out

Other Suggestions for Finding Apps
Looking for your apps? Try these two suggestions to make them easier to find:

  • Add your favorite apps (like Mail and Calendar) to your browser's bookmarks bar, and links will always show at the top of your browser. Every browser is different - here's  information about the bookmarks bar in Chrome.
  • Automatically open your favorite apps in new tabs each time you start your browser. Again, each browser is different - in Chrome, look for the "Open a specific page or set of pages" option
19 Dec, '13—9:30 am

Google Calendar invites sent to Google Groups will now automatically update as people are added to or removed from the group. In other words, if someone is added to the group, they will automatically be added to the event; anyone removed from the group will no longer see the event.  Please note that group membership does not automatically update if more than 200 people are on the event's guest list.

More information on inviting groups to events
More information about Google Groups at Brown

19 Dec, '13—9:30 am

Please join us for an Academic Technology Showcase Luncheon with Michael Satlow, December 13, 2013 at 12PM in 201 CIT (ETC). Professor Michael Satlow will be sharing his class on the Talmud and his use of Concept Mapping software. Lunch will be served.

4 Dec, '13—10:42 am

Since its release last week, CIS has evaluated the use of the Apple Mavericks operating system for compatibility with Brown’s computing environment. We’ve made changes to our wireless network to enable Cloudpath functionality, and VPN works well. 

However, we are aware of printing issues and other incompatibilities; early adopters may encounter trouble with these and other services. As a result, the CIS Service Center is not yet able to fully support Mavericks. See the following link for details: https://wiki.brown.edu/confluence/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=88506535

4 Dec, '13—10:42 am

On October 23rd, LinkedIn began offering Intro, their "Insights in your inbox", which allowed users to see LinkenIn (LI) profiles in their iPhone mail app. This extension of Apple's built-in iOS mail app is accomplished by routing email through a LI proxy server, where LI information is added to messages, which are then returned to the iPhone. According to Martin Kleppmann, senior software engineer at LI, "With Intro you can see at a glance the picture of the person who's emailing you, learn more about their background, and connect with them on LinkedIn." Here's a graphic that demonstrates how this works.

Intro immediately drew criticism from the IT security world, which pointed out that, in essence, Intro intercepted emails in order to inject LinkedIn information, a kind of "man-in-the-middle attack." Bishop Fox, a global security system, responded with the article "LinkedIn 'Intro'duces Insecurity", which listed ten reasons they considered it "a bad thing." These included concerns over attorney-client privilege, that LI changed the content of emails and a device's security profile, that it stores email communications, and its use could be a "gross violation of your company's security policy." They concluded their article by saying that the use of Intro at Bishop Fox would be banned on company devices until they could further investigate, and recommended that others do likewise and not introduce it into their environments.

Martin Kleppman responded to this criticism on the 24th, pointing out that Intro was an "opt-in" feature, requiring users to install it before being able to use it, and that usernames, passwords, and email contents are not permanently stored anywhere inside LinkedIn data centers, but instead, on your iPhone. (See the update on LinkedIn Intro: Doing the Impossible on iOS for a full list of Kleppman's reasons).

Since this story continues to develop and evolve, ISG recommends that LinkedIn/iOS users wait until all the facts are in so that they can make an informed decision on whether or not to use Intro.

Sources:

2 Dec, '13—5:57 pm

Here are ISG's Ten Travel Tips for your mobile device, especially for those traveling outside of the U.S. Please take a few moments to review them as an ounce of prevention now can save a pound of trouble later.

  1. Contact your cellular provider several weeks before you travel to discuss and activate the most cost-effective plan to fit your needs. For Brown devices, contact Telecommunications at 863-2007 or cellular@brown.edu. For non-Brown devices, users can contact their cellular provider directly.

  2. For phones, familiarize yourself with international roaming and data charges. We recommend turning off or setting a limit on cellular data usage for your smartphone to prevent incurring significant fees.

  3. Consider using Google+ Hangouts to bypass the phone. See the About Hangouts site for help on getting started.
  4. When traveling with a laptop, remove all PII from it or encrypt it. If possible, we recommend using a laptop specifically designated for travel with no personal information on it. Note: CIS has loaner laptops for faculty, staff and grad students who are working on projects when traveling abroad. The loaners can be signed out at the Computer Service & Repair window.

  5. Become aware of and comply with all export controls. For example, some countries ban or severely regulate the use of encryption, you should check country-specific information before traveling with an encrypted laptop. See the Symantec Endpoint Encryption FAQ on international traveling restrictions for details.

  6. Set a strong password or passcode for your device. Here are some ideas on how to create a strong and memorable password.

  7. Make sure all operating system and anti-malware software is current. If you haven't installed an anti-malware client for your phone, do so.

  8. Install device finder software, such as Computrace (for laptops) or Lookout (for tablets and phones).

  9. Use VPN to connect to Brown's network when away from it. CIS offers both a web and client versions. If you haven't used VPN before, test it before leaving.

  10. Make sure you have contact information for your local IT support professional and the Help Desk before you leave (help@brown.edu, 863-4357).

Finally, ISG offers other travel tips on the At Home and Traveling page. Traveling With Your Laptop reinforces the above information and provides a few more details.

Bon voyage!

15 Nov, '13—5:19 pm

If you are using a mid-2013 MacBook Air and have issues staying connected to Brown-Secure wireless, a software update might help. See this Apple Support article for more information and instructions. Please note that the patch cannot be installed on computers besides the MacBook Air.

15 Nov, '13—5:19 pm

On Thursday 10/31, the new version of Google Hangouts will be enabled for Brown accounts. If you were having issues connecting to a Google Hangout on an iPhone / iPad or initiating a Hangout from Google+, this update should resolve your issues. As previously, in order to access some features such as multi-person video chat, you must create a Google+ profile.

If you choose to create a Google+ profile, please remember to enter an accurate birth date when setting up your account - if you accidentally enter an age under 13, your account will be temporarily suspended. Google+ is not a core app and is not yet completely supported by Google, so while the CIS IT Service Center will make a best effort to resolve your issues, we will not able to receive assistance from Google.

8 Nov, '13—4:29 pm

Academic Technology is accepting applications for Winter Institute 2013, a 4-day program for faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate student instructors. Participants will explore the pedagogical underpinnings that inform the effective use of technology in teaching and learning, identify and develop technological solutions to meet their specific course goals and objectives. WI2013 will run from December 9th to 11th and 13th, 2013.

To apply, fill out the application form. The application deadline is November 3rd, 2013.

Image Credit: christmasstockimages.com

30 Oct, '13—2:11 pm

Apple has just made its new operating system, Mavericks, available as a free download. If you're eager to upgrade your Mac laptop or desktop, we recommend waiting for about a week so CIS can test compatibility with Brown's services. Mavericks is not yet supported by CIS. Next week, we will send another Morning Mail listing Brown services and their compatibility with Mavericks.