Graduate Fellows

Graduate Fellows

Poulomi ChakrabartiPoulomi Chakrabarti

Poulomi Chakrabarti
Political Science (Comparative Politics)

Project Title: One Nation, Many Worlds: Varieties of Developmental Regimes in India

Poulomi is a PhD student in the department of political science. Her research interests include political economy of development, identity politics, public service delivery and local governance with a regional focus on South Asia. Poulomi's dissertation project explores the determinants of sub-national variation in developmental regimes in India. She is interested in how the class and ethnic backgrounds of political elites and their electoral bases shapes the policy priorities of the state. She plans to begin research for her project this summer by exploring archival resources in the United States and India.

David Glick

David Glick
Economics

Project Title: Competition in Public Service Delivery: Evidence from India

My research examines the distribution of subsidized foods to poor, urban households in Punjab, India under the Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS). I seek to understand how an episode of increased competition among government-licensed shops may have affected distribution quality and health outcomes for the TPDS’ intended recipients. I hypothesize that this episode of increased competition strengthened these public service providers' incentives to reduce black-marketing of goods and instead provide better service to the poor.

Brian Horton

Brian Horton
Anthropology (Cultural)

Project Title: In the Wake of the Rainbow Spring: The Precariousness of Being Queer in a Post-377 India

I am a first year doctoral student in the department of anthropology. My research is focused on emerging LGBT collectivities and changing public perceptions of alternative sexuality in India. Ultimately, I am interested in the relationships between law, sexuality, and expanding categories of personhood established through legal recognition. My summer research will focus on LGBT activist/NGO work in Mumbai.

Rajeev Kadambi

Rajeev Kadambi
Political Science (Theory/Comparative Politics)

Project Title: Examining Ambedkar’s Vision of Social Justice through the Politics of Recognition: From Margins to the Main Site

Rajeev will study the intellectual trajectory of swaraj after Gandhi with a view to situate this in the traditions of Gandhian thought. His principal research will be archival. He will be based out of academic institutions in New Delhi and Bengaluru to carry out this work. He can be contacted at rajeev_kadambi@brown.edu

Daniel Kushner

Daniel Kushner
Political Science

Project Title: Reading Bhaarat: The Mediators that Connect Leaders to Voters

Daniel Kushner researches the impact of information about voters on Indian political parties. He is writing a dissertation using historical and contemporary cases, analyzing the effect of how a party learns about voters on the strategies the party uses to appeal to those voters.

Jamie McPike

Jamie McPike
Sociology

Project Title: Urban Governance at the Boundaries: Exploring the Intersection of State and City Politics Under NURM in Urban India

My research this summer is motivated primarily by two questions: 1) How and in what ways is state power at the sub-national and city level being (re)constituted in Indian cities under the National Urban Renewal Mission policy?; and 2) How and in what ways do various actors negotiate and struggle over the power to determine an urban future? To answer these questions, I intend to interview members of the sub-national and city level government in two cities (Bangalore and Chennai) as well as members of civil society and para-statal organizations currently working on the NURM policy in these two places. This research has important implications for contemporary theories of urban governance in India, and, broadly speaking, for theories of the changing nature of urban governance under conditions of contemporary global neoliberalism.

Andrea Wright

Andrea Wright
Anthropology

Project Title: Parlor or Salon: Beauty and Modernity in Contemporary India

I am a PhD student in the department of Anthropology. My research examines how women’s bodies and beauty are used as representations of modernity and development in India. I am most concerned with the ways in which beauty expectations, standards, procedures, products, and rituals have evolved over time to reflect changing political and cultural landscapes.