Videos

The Pembroke Center is pleased to present videos of some of our most popular programs.

We hope you enjoy this opportunity to view Pembroke Center programs at your convenience
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Covering the Bases: Brown Women in Sports
Commencement Forum, May 24, 2014

Sports matter. Playing sports can improve health, earn college scholarships, and launch professional careers. What is being done to create a level playing field for student and professional athletes? What are the challenges and opportunities for women athletes competing at the student, amateur, and professional levels? Brown alumnae discuss why sports matters for women and girls and their personal and professional experiences as leaders, researchers, and competitors in sports.

  • Sharon Cohen ’89, founder and executive director, Figure Skating in Harlem; former competitive figure skater
  • Laura Johnson ’90, lecturer in Studies of Women, Gender, & Sexuality and “Gender and Sports;” member, Faculty of Education, Harvard University
  • Sara Low ’83, fly-fishing guide and author
  • Moderator: Jasmine Waddell ’99, trustee, Corporation of Brown University; member, Pembroke Center Associates Council; resident dean of freshmen, Harvard College

Our Bodies Belong to God: Organ Transplants, Islam, and the Struggle for Human Dignity in Egypt
Family Weekend, October 18, 2013

A conversation with Sherine Hamdy, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Kutayba Alghanim Professor of Social Sciences, Debbie Weinstein ’93, Assistant Director of the Pembroke Center.

The discussion centers on Hamdy’s research on organ transplantation in Egypt.  By interviewing patients in need of organs, family members, physicians doing organ transplants, religious scholars, and journalists, Hamdy explores how biomedicine, politics, the law, kinship ties, and Islamic ethical reasoning intersect around a potentially life-saving medical treatment. Hamdy and Weinstein also discuss Hamdy's new research on medical neutrality.

A Sense of Humor: Brown Women in Comedy
Commencement Forum, May 25, 2013

From screenwriting to stand-up, women have been closing the gender gap in comedy. How did they break into the business? How did their personal experiences shape their comedic voices? What's fair game and what's off limits in their humor? Learn how Brown alumnae are making a living by making people laugh.

  • Lauren Corrao'83, P'16
  • Marin Hinkle'88
  • Tara Schuster'03
  • Suzanne Whang SCM'86

An Alternative to Nature v. Nurture: Human Biology in a Social World

A conversation with Dr. Anne Fausto-Sterling
Nancy Duke Lewis Professor of Biology and Gender Studies

Debbie Weinstein, assistant director of the Pembroke Center, speaks with Anne Fausto-Sterling, Nancy Duke Lewis Professor of Biology and Gender Studies, about the professor's research on human development. Some believe that biology explains human behaviors; others believe society is responsible for the differences between people. Fausto-Sterling proposes that biological difference can be produced over time in response to different social experiences.

Critical Visionaries: Women Leaders and Institution Building

A conversation with President Ruth Simmons and Alison Bernstein. Moderated by Kay Warren.

Video provided with the help of Advancement Information Services

2011 Family Weekend Program: The Therapeutic Fix

Lynne Joyrich AM ’84, PhD ’90, Associate Professor of Modern Culture and Media; Suzanne Stewart-Steinberg, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature; and Italian Studies, and Debbie Weinstein ’93, Assistant Director of the Pembroke Center discuss the rise of therapeutic culture in modern America.

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2011 Commencement Forum: Award Winning Theater: Brown Playwrights and Their Work

Award-winning playwrights Adam Bock ’89 AM (The Receptionist, The Thugsand A Small Fire) and Lynn Nottage ’86 (Ruined, Intimate Apparel and Crumbs from the Table of Joy) talk about how they write to inspire, provoke, and engage theater audiences around the world.

National Council for Research on Women's "Making a Difference for Women" Awards Dinner Honoring President Ruth Simmons

Introduced by Pembroke Center Director Kay Warren, President Simmons discusses the importance of research on gender and difference to our society. The Pembroke Center is a founding member center of the National Council for Research on Women. Natalie Morales of NBC News introduces the segment.

Collateral Knowledge: Legal Reasoning in the Global Financial Markets

Pembroke Research Lecture
Tuesday, May 3, 2011

Annelise Riles is the Jack G. Clarke Professor of Law in Far East Legal Studies and Professor of Anthropology at Cornell, and she serves as Director of the Clarke Program in East Asian Law and Culture. Her work focuses on the transnational dimensions of laws, markets and culture. Her most recent book, Collateral Knowledge: Legal Reasoning in the Global Financial Markets (Chicago Press 2011), is based on ten years of fieldwork among regulators and lawyers in the global derivatives markets. She recently co-edited a special issue of the journal, Law and Contemporary Problems, Transdisciplinary Conflict of Laws, which rethinks the field of Conflict of Laws from an interdisciplinary perspective. Professor Riles has conducted legal and anthropological research in China, Japan and the Pacific and speaks Chinese, Japanese, French, and Fijian. She also writes about financial markets regulation on her blog.

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The Hip Hop Wars

Tricia Rose '93 PhD
Professor of Africana Studies

The Pembroke Center Associates co-sponsored this talk on February 25, 2010 with the Brown Club of Boston, the Asian/Asian American Alumni Association, the Brown University Latino Alumni Council, the Inman Page Black Alumni Council, and the Multicultural Alumni Council of the Brown Alumni Association. 

In her recent book, The Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk About When We Talk About Hip Hop and Why It Matters, Professor Rose voices a call for revitalization of the progressive, creative heart of hip hop, which has increasingly become defined by one thin slice of a varied, complex genre. While "conscious rappers" such as Talib Kweli and The Roots may receive enormous critical acclaim, it's the rappers who employ what Rose calls the "gangsta-pimp-ho trinity"- such as T.I. and 50 Cent-who sell the most records and dominate the recording industry, TV, film, and radio. As a result, the most visible and widely-consumed hip hop sets forth a troubled vision of ghetto street life that defines young, at-risk black men and women to each other and also to a large white audience (seventy percent of hip hop consumers are white). After exploring how hip hop has become the primary means by which we talk about race and culture in the United States, Rose offers six guiding principles for progressive hip hop creativity, consumption, and community, ending the "blame hip hop vs. explain hip hop" wars and promoting critical conversations that inspire transformational music as well as social justice for all.

2009 Commencement Forum -
Crisis: Policies to Strengthen a Troubled Economy

May 23, 2009

In 2008 and 2009, the U.S. economy was buffeted by the housing slump, a credit crisis, rising unemployment, gyrating energy prices, and a dramatic rise in the federal deficit. The Obama Administration and economic leaders have been implementing new policies to address the crisis and stabilize consumer confidence. In the Pembroke Center’s 2009 Commencement Forum, Annette L. Nazareth ’78, Partner, Davis, Polk & Wardwell and a former Commissioner of the Securities and Exchange Commission; Randall S. Kroszner ’84, Norman R. Bobins Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a former Governor of the Federal Reserve Board; and, Jill Schlesinger ’87, Editor-at-Large of CBS MoneyWatch.com to discussed the current state of the U.S. economy and the prospects for recovery.

Pembroke Hall Rededication

After completing renovations to the historic building to house the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women and the Cogut Center for the Humanities, the University held a rededication ceremony, presided over by President Ruth J. Simmons, on October 16, 2008.

Rembembering Pembroke Hall

As the University prepared to renovate Pembroke Hall, which was rededicated in 2008, the Pembroke Center interviewed Sophia Schaffer Blistein'41, GP'01, GP16, Beatrice Wattman Miller'35, P'59, GP'86 MD'91, Elaine Frank Lieberman'39, and Ruth Bugbee Lubrano'23, P'52, GP'91 about their experiences in Pembroke Hall as students.