Who We Are

Faculty

Tayhas Palmore, C4 Director and PI 

Wesley Bernskoetter, Assistant Professor of Chemistry


Nilay Hazari, Yale University, Assistant Professor of Chemistry


Robert Hurt, Professor of Engineering

Andrew Peterson, Assistant Professor of Engineering

Christoph Rose-Petruck, Professor of Chemistry

Shouheng Sun, Professor of Chemistry

 

Graduate and Undergraduate Students

Steven Ahn

Steve is developing an electrochemical approach to regenerate (triphos)Mo0 complexes for electrocatalytic coupling of CO2 and C2H4 to generate acrylate in collaboration with the Bernskoetter group. In addition, he is evaluating the electrochemical properties of graphene nanosacks in collaboration with the Hurt group. 

Liz Bielinski

Liz's research focuses on designing first row transition metal catalysts, specifically iron, for the catalytic transformation of CO2 and H2 to formate. Her work involves collaboration with electrochemists, computational chemists, and will hopefully offer a meaningful contribution to the understanding and application of industrial chemicals such as formate. 

Yantao Chen

Yantao is developing carbon nanomaterials as catalyst supports with a specific focus on graphene nanosacks. The electrochemical behavior of these materials as supports for both molecular and nanoparticle catalysts are being studied in collaboration with the Bernskoetter, Hazari, Palmore and Sun groups. 

Daniel DeCiccio

Daniel is using electrochemical methods to investigate the catalytic performance and mechanism by which different electrodeposited metal alloys reduce CO2 to different products. In collaboration with the Hurt group, these alloys will be supported in graphene nanosacks and electrochemically characterized. In collaboration with the Hazari group, Dan will evaluate the electrochemical properties of new molecular catalyts based on firsrt-row transition metals.

 

Yuxi Huang

Yuxi's research is focused on copper-based nanoparticles for electrochemical reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons. 

Kangning Jiang

Kangning will focus onon investigating the chemical dynamics of the electrochemical reduction of CO2 on copper surface with clathrate hydrates as a source of feedstock CO2. The reduction products will be identified and quantified by spectroscopic techniques. 

Dong Jin

Seok Ki Kim

Seok Ki's research interest is designing rational catalysts for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide into hydrocarbons based on both the experimental and theoretical perspective. 

Dan Liu

Dan is using electrochemical methods to investigate the catalytic performance and mechanism by which different electrodeposited metal alloys reduce CO2 to different products. In collaboration with the Hurt group, these alloys will be supported in graphene nanosacks and electrochemically characterized. In collaboration with the Hazari group, Dan will evaluate the electrochemical properties of new molecular catalyts based on firsrt-row transition metals.

Haifeng Lv

Haifeng's research is focused on using nanostructure metal alloys to lower the overpotential of CO2 reduction. He is synthesizing unique core-shell structured nano particles to increase the yield of hydrocarbon products during electrochemical reduction of CO2. In collaboration with the Peterson group, these materials are being modeled for their catalytic capacity.

Alex MacIntosh

Alex is working on the synthesis, characterization, and catalytic properties of organometallic electrocatalysts for the activation and functionalization of CO2.

Danielle Rand

Danielle's research for the CCI will involve using Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging, a novel type of x-ray imaging, for the analysis of nanoparticle catalysts. SFHI will allow for the characterization of entire catalytic surfaces, and in particular will be useful in determining nanoparticle load on various supports.

Tim Schmeier

Tim is focused on finding first row transition metal catalysts for the hydrogenation of CO2 to formic acid. Both thermal and electrochemical (in collaboration with the Palmore group) approaches are being be explored. Once a successful catalyst has been discovered, the mechanism by which catalysis occurs will be investigated, with the goal of designing even more efficient second generation catalysts. In addition, first generation catalysts will be attached to a solid supports in collaboration with the Hurt group.

Sujat Sen

Sujat is exploring the use of copper and its alloys for the heterogeneous electrocatalytic reduction of CO2. This work is complementary to the other CCI efforts to activate CO2 using homogeneous catalysts or immobilized catalysts. He also is exploring the use of molecular additives to enhance the electroreduction of CO2.

Ruben Spitz-Steinberg

Ruben is fabricating VAGLAs and graphene multilayer structures to support new heterogeneous catalysts being developed by Sun and Peterson groups.

Zhongying Wang

Zhongying is working on the development of graphene-based materials as catalyst supports loading catalytic-reactive nanoparticles. The electrochemical behavior of these novel hybrid materials is studied in collaboration with the Palmore group.

Christopher Wright

Christopher is working on the design, synthesis, and characterization of nanoscale materials for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide.  This work features the synthesis of novel materials with the aim of enhancing product selectivity and reducing energy losses.  Additionally, Christopher is developing novel support mechanisms for nanoparticles on electrodes to enhance catalysis.

Yin-Jia Zhang

Yin-Jia is currently studying the competition between CO2 reduction and hydrogen evolution, and CO2 reduction on carbides through both DFT calculations and experimental methods. 

Yuanyuan Zhang

Yuanyuan is working on catalytically coupling CO2 and C2H4 to generate acrylate. New synthetic methods are been developed for (triphos)Mo0 to couple CO2 and C2H4 to yield (triphos)Mo(H)(PPh3)(O2CCHCH2). In collaboration with the Palmore group, electrochemical methods are being applied to eliminate acrylate and regenerate (triphos)Mo0 to form a catalytic cycle. The mechanism of this catalytic cycle also is being studied, offering guidance in the design of new catalysts.

Huiyuan Zhu

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