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Events

The Destruction of Memory: A Film Screening and Q&A with the Director
Tim Slade (Vast Productions USA)

Monday, November 28th, 2016 at 6:00pm

Over the past century, cultural destruction has wrought catastrophic results across the globe. This war against culture is not over - it's been steadily increasing. In Syria and Iraq, the ‘cradle of civilization’, millennia of culture are being destroyed. The push to protect, salvage and rebuild has moved in step with the destruction. Legislation and policy have played a role, but heroic individuals have fought back, risking and losing their lives to protect not just other human beings, but our cultural identity - to save the record of who we are. Based on the book of the same name by Robert Bevan, The Destruction of Memory tells the whole story - looking not just at the ongoing actions of Daesh (ISIS) and at other contemporary situations, but revealing the decisions of the past that allowed the issue to remain hidden in the shadows for so many years. Interviewees in the film include the Director-General of UNESCO, the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, as well as diverse and distinguished international experts, whose voices combine to address this urgent issue.

This screening is the first event in the series, "Combating Crisis: New Responses to Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Middle East," sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, in collaboration with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, the Cogut Center for Humanities, and the Program in Middle East Studies.

List Art Building, Room 120

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Material Girls in a Material World: Anthropomorphic Clay Figurines on Cyprus from 1750-750 BCE
Emily Booker (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)

Thursday, December 1st, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Emily Booker, doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Textualized Object and Objectified Text: Exploring the Boundaries Between Writing and Object in Early and Medieval China
Guo Jue (Barnard College)

Thursday, December 1st, 2016 at 5:30pm

Guo Jue is Assistant Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures and Co-Chair of the Columbia Early China Seminar at Barnard College. She received her Ph.D (2008) in Early China from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prior to joining Barnard, she was an Assistant Professor of Chinese Religions at Western Michigan University (2008-2013) and a visiting research fellow at the Cluster of Asia and Europe at Universität Heidelberg (2012-2013), Germany. She specializes in Early China, especially from the Warring States period to Han times (5th century B.C.E.-3rd century C.E.). Her research interests are primarily in ritual practices, material culture, and social, religious, and cultural history of early societies. Using both received history and archaeological sources, she is interested in looking at the intersection and interaction between writing and object, and studying topics including divination, death rituals, tombs and burials, and everyday life in early to medieval China from anthropological and historical perspectives, as well as the way they are theorized in comparative studies.

Co-sponsored by Brown University's Department of History of Art and Architecture, Program in Early Cultures, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Presentation of Dissertation Research:
Works in Progress: Regional Trends and Grassroots Developments in the Cities of Roman North Africa
J. Andrew Dufton (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology)

Monday, December 5th, 2016 at 10:00am

Andrew Dufton, a doctoral candidate in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present his dissertation research in a public lecture. All are welcome.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Karl Krusell, Alex Marko, and Martin Uildriks (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)

December 2016

Karl Krusell, Alex Marko, and Martin Uildriks, doctoral students in Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, will report on their Fall Proctorship activities in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Gil Stein (Oriental Institute, University of Chicago)

January 2017

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Laurie Rush (United States Army, Fort Drum, NY)

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017 at 5:30pm

Dr. Laurie Rush is Cultural Resources Manager and Army Archaeologist at Fort Drum, NY. Dr. Rush is also a Board Member of the U.S. Committee of the Blue Shield.

This lecture is the second event in the series, "Combating Crisis: New Responses to Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Middle East," sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, in collaboration with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, the Cogut Center for Humanities, and the Program in Middle East Studies.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Archaeology Concentrators Welcome Back Lunch

Thursday, February 2nd, 2017 from 12:00-1:00pm

All concentrators -- and prospective concentrators -- in Archaeology and the Ancient World are invited to enjoy some pizza and share stories of what they did over the winter break!

Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 109

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Eduardo Neves (Harvard University)

Thursday, February 9th, 2017 at 12:00pm

Eduardo Neves, visiting faculty at Harvard University, will present his research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Carvings in and out of Time:
Afterlives of Rock-Cut Monuments in the Ancient Mediterranean and Near East

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

From the moment rock-cut monuments were carved people have asked themselves who made them, when, and why? They are part of the natural landscape, yet are conspicuously anthropogenic. Many of them became part of the regional and cultural memory of their environs. They traverse cultural and chronological boundaries.

Our purpose is to study the monuments' successive re-interpretations and manipulations, their cultural recycling. The history of their re-interpretations exemplifies the intricate interaction of ancient cultures with their own, even more ancient, past. The result is a layered landscape of cultural meaning and natural transformations that can furnish precious evidence about the pre-modern archaeological imagination.

We aim to bring diverse specialists on the ancient world to Brown University to tackle the following questions: who in the pre-modern period was interested in rock-cut monuments? How did ancient interpreters make sense of their images and texts? And, how can we as contemporary scholars, begin to address such questions?

Co-sponsored by Brown University's Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World

https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/workshops/rockcutmonuments

Location TBA

Heritage Museums and the Classical Past in the 21st Century
Nikos Papadimitriou (Museum of Cycladic Art in Athens)

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2017 at 5:30pm

Modern museums owe a great debt to Classical Antiquity. Not only are they named after the Muses; their very character has been forged upon the logocentric view of the universe introduced by ancient Greek philosophers, and revived by the thinkers of the Renaissance and the European Enlightenment. Of crucial importance for the success of 19th century museums was their open, public character and their adherence to the (by then) revolutionary principles of critical thought, empirical knowledge, scientific research and the questioning of axiomatic ‘truths’.

Almost two centuries later, museums continue to thrive around the world, often promoting pioneering ways of perceiving the past. This is in contrast to Classical studies, which suffer a bleak recession, with academic positions diminishing rapidly and the number of students in Classics Departments falling abruptly. Why is it so? Why does academia fail where museums succeed? How do they differ in “treating the past”? And how can this divide be bridged?

In this lecture, Dr. Nikolas Papadimitriou, Curator of Antiquities at the Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens, will review the history of museums, discuss the social and political conditions that allowed them to become broadly relevant to modern societies, and address the role of institutionalized education in the modern world.

Co-sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Program in Modern Greek Studies.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

The ‘Kingdom of Idols': Recent Investigations at Tell Tayinat (Ancient Kunulua, Biblical Calno) in Southeastern Turkey
Stephen D. Batiuk (University of Toronto)

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017 at 6:30pm

The interplay between the Hebrew Bible and the archaeological record has all too often been a contentious affair, greatly dependent on how one understands its compositional history, as well as the cultural and geopolitical context in which it was written. This talk presents the latest results of the University of Toronto’s excavations at Tell Tayinat, ancient Kunulua (Biblical Calno), located in the North Orontes Valley in the southeastern province of Hatay in modern day Turkey. The lecture will focus on the Iron II-III levels (9th to 7th Century) at the site, which record the changing fortunes of a Neo-Hittite Kingdom perched on the edge of the Assyrian Empire, and will explore how archaeological evidence from the Northern Levantine Royal city can shed light on the local history of a region, while also providing insight into the cultural environment in which the Biblical texts were written.

This lecture is co-sponsored with the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America. For more information, visit https://aianarragansett.org.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Neil Brodie (Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East & North Africa, University of Oxford)

Sunday, April 2nd-Saturday, April 8th, 2017

Brodie's visit is part of the year-long series, "Combating Crisis: New Responses to Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Middle East," sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, in collaboration with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, the Cogut Center for Humanities, and the Program in Middle East Studies.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Combating Crisis in the Middle East

Friday, April 21st-Saturday, April 22nd, 2017

A two-day workshop focused on new approaches and reactions to cultural heritage preservation in the Middle East, beginning with a keynote lecture by Dr. Morag Kersel (DePaul University) on Friday evening.

This is the final event in the series, "Combating Crisis: New Responses to Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Middle East," sponsored by the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, in collaboration with the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, the Cogut Center for Humanities, and the Program in Middle East Studies.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Archaeology DUG's End of the Year Social

April 2017 (preceding the thesis presentations)

The Archaeology & the Ancient World DUG will be hosting a social at 3:30 pm in Rhode Island Hall. All Archaeology concentrators, as well as all those interested in archaeology and the ancient world, are welcome to attend. It's a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of archaeology! Refreshments will be served!

Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall

Presentations of Senior Thesis Research in Archaeology and the Ancient World

April 2017 (following the DUG social)

Senior concentrators in Archaeology and the Ancient World will share their thesis research in a series of 10-minute presentations.

This event is open to the public, and all are welcome!

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Archaeology and the Ancient World Commencement Ceremony

Sunday, May 28th, 2017

Following the ceremony on Brown's Main Green.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall

State of the Field 2017:
The Archaeology of Diversity

Fall 2017

The Joukowsky Institute will convene a two-day workshop to examine and discuss issues of diversity and inclusion in archaeology. We plan to announce a Call for Papers prior to the workshop, and will share further details as they are finalized.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

 

 

Additional Links and Resources:

The Program in Early Cultures is now maintaining a calendar of events and exhibits in and around Providence, pertaining to the ancient world.

The Joukowsky Institute is affiliated with the Narragansett Society (The Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America).

For talks in the discipline of Classics, see the Boston Area Classics Calendar.

 

Past Events:

Click on the links below for past events: