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Past Events

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Archaeology as History: 19th Century Ottoman Conceptualizations
Meltem Toksoz (Middle East Studies, Brown University)

Thursday, November 17th, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Meltem Toksoz, Visiting Associate Professor of Middle East Studies at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

(News) Stories from the Middle East: Removed Artefacts, Recycling, and the Ethical Agenda against Illicit Trade
Mirjam Brusius (Oxford University)

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016 at 5:30pm

Mirjam Brusius is a Mellon Post-doctoral Fellow in the History of Photography, a post she holds in conjunction with the Bodleian Library, at Oxford University. She previously held Postdoctoral Fellowships at Harvard University, the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, and the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz. Her research addresses the intersection of modern history of science and the history of European and Islamic art. It centres on the history of photography, museums, collecting, and scientific voyages in and between Europe and the Middle East.

Co-sponsored by Brown University's Center for Middle East Studies, Department of History of Art and Architecture, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Body/Image: Towards an Ontology of Anthropomorphism in First Millennium CE Northwest Argentina
Benjamin Alberti (Framingham College)

Thursday, November 10th, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Benjamin Alberti, Chair and Professor of Sociology at Framingham College, will present his research in an informal talk, titled, "Body/Image: Towards an Ontology of Anthropomorphism in First Millennium CE Northwest Argentina". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

The Deviant Daughters of Miletus: Foundation Traditions in Ionia
Naoise Mac Sweeney (University of Leicester)

Wednesday, November 9th, 2016 at 5:30pm

Naoise Mac Sweeney is Associate Professor in Ancient History at the University of Leicester, specialising in the study of ethnicity, identity and migration. She has published widely in the fields of ancient history, archaeology, race relations, international development and peacebuilding studies, and she is the author of Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013). She has also pursued her research interests through archaeological fieldwork in Turkey, in particular as part of the Kilise Tepe Archaeological Project.

Co-sponsored by Brown University's Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Playing with Fire: Experimental Neolithic Cooking in Cyprus
Andrew P. McCarthy (Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute, and University of Edinburgh)

Monday, November 7th, 2016 at 5:30pm

The Neolithic period in Cyprus had a range of site-types (permanent village, hunting camp, seasonal inhabitation, ritual centres, etc.) and mobility must be considered a factor in the use of the landscape. Without many more excavated sites, however, it is difficult to examine the relationships between sites of different type and their place in the landscape. The Neolithic remains at Prasteio Mesorotsos have recently revealed two cooking installations that can shed light on both mobility and sedentism and possibly provide the fulcrum between the various types of sites that we know about. One feature is a domestic -scale domed oven, which reflects the cooking habits of the inhabitants that resided at this location for at least some part of the year. Another feature is a remarkable large-scale pit oven that would have been capable of feeding a great many people, more than is presumed for a single community. These two features provide contrasting habits that reflect the interactions between mobile (possibly hunting or pastoral) groups and seasonal sedentary populations. In particular, the pit-oven can be thought to have been used in feasts that gathered multiple communities into a single place. In order to understand these activities, in 2015 and 2016 an experimental project was conducted reconstructing the the pit oven and a large feast was organized for local communities in order to test hypotheses about the labor involved in production, the number of people that could have been fed and the possibilities for inter-community interaction.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Uncovering Meaning in Undeciphered Writing Systems: The Role of “Postscripts” in Proto-Elamite Texts
Laura Hawkins (Egyptology and Assyriology, Brown University)

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Laura Hawkins, a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Egyptology and Assyriology at Brown University, will present her research in an informal talk, titled, "Uncovering Meaning in Undeciphered Writing Systems: The Role of “Postscripts” in Proto-Elamite Texts". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Archaeology DUG Meet and Greet

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016 at 5:00pm

The Archaeology & the Ancient World Department Undergraduate Group will be hosting a social at 5pm, following the Fieldwork Info Session, in RI Hall. All Archaeology concentrators, as well as all those interested in archaeology and the ancient world, are welcome to attend. It's a wonderful chance to engage with others who share a love of archaeology! Refreshments will be served!

Sponsored by the Archaeology Departmental Undergraduate Group

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall

Archaeological Fieldwork Information Session

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016 at 4:00pm

Where can you do fieldwork this summer? How can you pay for it? How do you apply? What's an UTRA grant? Should you enroll in a field school or volunteer? What courses should you take to prepare? Do you have to be an archaeology concentrator? What is fieldwork, anyway? And what about study abroad?

Download the Fieldwork Information Session 2015 Handout (Note: an updated handout will also be available at the meeting)

Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall, Room 108

Prisoners of War: Durham and the Fate of the Scots in 1650
Durham University, UK

Thursday, October 27th, 2016 at 7:30pm

Archaeologists from Durham University, UK, will tell the fascinating history of how prisoners from a seventeenth century battle between England and Scotland came to Massachusetts. Transported to the US as indentured servants, some of the men went on to become successful farmers and there are now hundreds of descendants of these soldiers living in New England and beyond. The talk will also set out the research methods used by the archaeologists on human remains, discovered during construction of a new café at Durham University in 2013. This research has helped solve the almost 400-year-old mystery of where hundreds of soldiers, who died whilst held captive in Durham, were buried. #ScotsSoldiers

Sponsored by Durham University Department of Archaeology (@ArcDurham).

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Excavating China’s First Archaeologist
Jeff Moser (History of Art and Architecture, Brown University)

Thursday, October 27th, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Jeff Moser, Assistant Professor of History of Art and Architecture, will present his research in an informal talk, titled, "Excavating China’s First Archaeologist". Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

If Venice Dies
Salvatore Settis (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa)

Tuesday, October 25th, 2016 at 7:00pm

What is Venice worth? To whom does this urban treasure belong? Internationally renowned art historian Salvatore Settis urgently poses these questions, igniting a new debate about the Pearl of the Adriatic and cultural patrimony at large. Venetians are increasingly abandoning their hometown—there’s now only one resident for every 140 visitors—and Venice’s fragile fate has become emblematic of the future of historic cities everywhere as it capitulates to tourists and those who profit from them. In If Venice Dies, a fiery blend of history and cultural analysis, Settis argues that “hit-and-run” visitors are turning landmark urban settings into shopping malls and theme parks. He warns that Western civilization’s prime achievements face impending ruin from mass tourism and global cultural homogenization. This is a passionate plea to secure the soul of Venice, written with consummate authority, wide-ranging erudition and élan.

Salvatore Settis is chairman of the Louvre Museum’s Scientific Council and former director of the Getty Research Institute of Los Angeles and the Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa.

Co-sponsored by Brown University's Departments of Italian Studies and History of Art and Architecture, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, and Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall, 60 George Street

International Archaeology Day and Brown University Family Weekend, I
Joukowsky Institute Open House: Archaeology in Action

Saturday, October 22nd, 2016, 11:00 AM-3:00 pm

Come visit the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World in Rhode Island Hall. See ancient coins, human and animal bones, precious metals, ceramics, and other artifacts. Tour one of the oldest buildings on Brown’s campus. And talk with Brown’s archaeologists about their fieldwork all over the world!

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall, 60 George Street

International Archaeology Day and Brown University Family Weekend, II
Archaeology of College Hill Community Archaeology Day

Saturday, October 22nd, 2016, 11:00 AM-3:00 pm

Watch Brown undergraduates digging (yes, really digging!). This year, as part of ongoing work on Brown's campus and in the surrounding neighborhoods of College Hill, students will be excavating at the nearby Moses Brown school. Stop by (with your family or on your own) any time between 11:00 am and 3:00 pm to see what we're up to or try your hand at digging. All are welcome!

Moses Brown School, 250 Lloyd Avenue (Excavation at the corner of Hope Street and Lloyd Avenue)

The Chariot of the Sun-God: Technological Innovation and Near Eastern Cult Practice
Mary Bachvarova (Willamette University)

Thursday, October 20th, 2016 at 6:30pm

Mary Bachvarova is Professor of Classics and Department Chair of Classical Studies at Willamette University. She co-edited The Fall of Cities in the Mediterranean: Commemoration in Literature, Folk-Song, and Liturgy, and is the author of From Hittite to Homer: The Anatolian Background of Greek Epic.

Co-sponsored by Brown University's Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Agency Sits in Places: Arctic Ecology and Modern Ideology in the Bering Strait, 1840-1980
Bathsheba Demuth (History, Brown University)

Thursday, October 20th, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Bathsheba Demuth, Assistant Professor of History and Fellow at the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Postcolonial Pontus: Indigenous-Colonial Relations in Northern Anatolia from the Early Colonial Encounters to the Fall of Mithridates VI
Owen Doonan (California State University Northridge)

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016 at noon

Owen Doonan is Associate Professor of Art in the Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies Program at California State University Northridge. He focused on early Sicilian Architecture and society in his PhD (1993) at Brown University’s Center for Old World Archaeology and Art. Since 1996 he has led the Sinop Regional Archaeological Project, a regional study of archaeology, culture and environment in the Sinop Province, northern Turkey. He has authored one book (Sinop Landscapes: Exploring Connection in the Hinterland of a Black Sea Port), edited another and published more than forty articles relating to the archaeology of the Mediterranean and Black Sea regions. In 2010 he co-founded the New Sahara Gallery in Northridge, the first Los Angeles area gallery to specialize in the contemporary fine art of the Middle East and North Africa.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Çaltılar Archaeological Project: Discovering Ancient Lycia
Tamar Hodos (University of Bristol)

Monday, October 17th, 2016 at 5:30pm

Tamar Hodos is a Reader in Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of Bristol. She is a specialist in the archaeology of the Mediterranean's Iron Age, a period that extends between c.1200-c.600 BCE, with particular interest in the impact of colonisation, and the construction and expression of social identities. Until 2012, she co-directed the Çaltılar Archaeological Project, a collaboration between Bristol, Liverpool and Uludağ (Turkey) Universities. This project, based in the south-western Turkish region of Lycia, examined the role this area played with the Aegean, Greek and wider Mediterranean worlds during the Bronze and Iron Ages. She is the author of the book, Local Responses to Colonization in the Iron Age Mediterranean, and co-editor of Material Culture and Social Identities in the Ancient World.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Megalomania at Sea: The Recovery of Hellenistic Naval Architecture during the Renaissance
Lilia Campana (Texas A&M University)

Thursday, October 13th, 2016 at 6:30pm

During the Renaissance, Italian humanists attempted to recover the maritime golden age of ancient Greece and Rome. In resurrecting ancient warships, humanists looked at the most magnificent period in maritime history, the Hellenistic Age (323-31 B.C.), which produced a burst of unprecedented proportions resulting in warships of increasingly large size that eventually came to replace the trireme. Since no archaeological remains of ancient warships were available and have yet to be found, the study of ancient texts was crucial to the recovery of ancient naval architecture. Based on the study of several Renaissance naval treatises and unpublished archival sources, two shipbuilding projects are known: the quinqueremis built in 1529 by the Venetian humanist Vettor Fausto (1490-1546), and the grandiose and yet completely unknown attempt in 1570 by the erudite Filippo Pigafetta (1533-1604) to recover the design of the tessarakonteres of Ptolemy IV Philopator (r. 221-204 B.C.), the biggest ship ever built in the ancient Mediterranean. Both Fausto and Pigafetta believed that the knowledge of ancient texts was centrally relevant to the design of their ships and to the solution of practical problems of naval architecture in the material world.

This lecture is co-sponsored with the Narragansett Society, the Rhode Island chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America. For more information, visit https://aianarragansett.org.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Archives Are Archaeological Objects
Sophie Moore (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)

Thursday, October 13th, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Sophie Moore, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Next Steps: Information Session on Applying to Graduate School and Searching for Jobs in Archaeology and Classics

Thursday, October 6th, 2016 at 4:00pm

A discussion, led by faculty and graduate students, for current undergraduates planning for life after Brown. We will discuss applying to graduate schools in Archaeology and Classics, as well as types of jobs students with Archaeology and Classics concentrations might consider.

View additional information on Life After Graduating from Brown with an Archaeology Degree here: https://brown.edu/Departments/Joukowsky_Institute/undergrad/grad.html

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

The Phoenicians and the Making of the Mediterranean (8th-7th centuries BCE): A View from Tartessos
Carolina López-Ruiz (Ohio State University)

Wednesday, October 5th, 2016 at 5:30pm

Carolina López-Ruiz is an Associate Professor in the Department of Classics at the Ohio State University. Her research focuses on understanding Greek culture in its broader ancient Mediterranean context, particularly looking at cultural exchanges and processes of integration and adaptation in Near Eastern and Greek interaction. She edited Gods, Heroes, and Monsters: A Sourcebook of Greek, Roman, and the Near Eastern Myths in Translation (2014) and is the author of When the Gods Were Born: Greek Cosmogonies and the Near East (2012), as well as many other publications.

Co-sponsored by Brown University's Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

The Other Side of the Border: Documenting Morocco's Migrant & Refugee Crisis
Isabella Alexander (Emory University)

Friday, September 30th, 2016 at 12:00pm

Co-sponsored by Brown University's Department of Anthropology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World

Department of Anthropology, Giddings House, Room 212

Brown Bag Series in Archaeology
Zooarchaeological and Genetic Evidence for Cattle Domestication in Ancient China
Katherine Brunson (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University)

Thursday, September 29th, 2016 from 12:00-1:00pm

Katherine Brunson, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Archaeology and the Ancient World, will present her research in an informal talk. Pizza and soda will be provided, or feel free to bring a lunch.

For a full list of Archaeology Brown Bag talks, please visit https://blogs.brown.edu/archaeology/events/brown-bag-series/.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Gods of Egypt: See the Movie... Then Think About It

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016 at 7:00 pm

A free screening of the movie Gods of Egypt, on a giant screen, with surround sound! Followed by commentaries by Brown professors, examining the themes and historical basis of the movie.

And free popcorn! Free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the Archaeology Department Undergraduate Group

Salomon Hall, Room 001

Visibility, Place, and Movement: Ancient Egyptian Images and Their Contexts
John Baines (Oxford University)

Monday, September 26th, 2016 at 5:30pm

John Baines is Professor Emeritus of Egyptology and Fellow of The Queen's College at the University of Oxford, where he taught from 1976 to 2013. His principal areas of interest are Egyptian art, literature, religion, self-presentation, the position of writing in Egyptian society, and modelling social forms. He is currently working on elite uses of the wider environment, particularly in forms and practices, such as hunting, that must be approached indirectly because they leave little physical trace.

Co-sponsored by Brown University's Department of Egyptology and Assyriology, and Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

State of the Field 2016:
The Archaeology of Egypt

Friday, September 23rd-Saturday, September 24th, 2016

State of the Field 2016: The Archaeology of Egypt is a two-day workshop, focusing with the ways in which boundaries are being broken in Egyptian archaeology -- temporally, geographically, methodologically, and politically. This workshop is meant to highlight the ways in which the field is still struggling in each area, how it can improve, and why it needs to do so.

Keynote:
Stuart Tyson Smith (University of California, Santa Barbara)
"Entanglements: Egypt and Nubia, Anthropology and Egyptology"

Session Participants:

Elizabeth Bolman
Pearce Paul Creasman
Monica Hanna
Gregory Marouard
Gerry Scott
Neal Spencer
Josef Wegner
Willeke Wendrich

Full schedule available at https://brown.edu/go/egypt2016. Updates on Twitter and Facebook using #sotfegypt.

Free and open to the public. No pre-registration required.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Field Dirt: Insider Stories and Results from Brown's 2016 Archaeological Field Seasons
Sheila Bonde, John F. Cherry, Yannis Hamilakis, Andrew Scherer, Peter van Dommelen, and Parker VanValkenburgh

Monday, September 12th, 2016 at 6:00 PM

Professors Sheila Bonde, John Cherry, Yannis Hamilakis, Andrew Scherer, Peter van Dommelen, and Parker VanValkenburgh will share the latest news from their archaeological fieldwork this summer in Greece, France, Montserrat, Mexico, Italy, and Peru.

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall Room 108

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology's
Welcome Back (to the Trenches) Reception

Friday, September 9th, 2016, 5:00-7:00 pm

Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Rhode Island Hall

 

 

More Events:

Click on the links below for additional events held between September 2006 and May 2015.

 

Additional Links and Resources:

The Program in Early Cultures is now maintaining a calendar of events and exhibits in and around Providence, pertaining to the ancient world.

The Joukowsky Institute is closely affiliated with the Narragansett Society (The Rhode Island Chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America).

For talks in the discipline of Classics, see the Boston Area Classics Calendar.