Courses for Spring 2015

CLAS

  • The Greeks

    For centuries Western civilizations have seen the Greeks as their intellectual and spiritual ancestors. The 'Greek miracle' is explored by reviewing its major achievements and discoveries: poetry (heroic epic, tragedy, political comedy), philosophy, historical research, political analysis and institutions, science. All texts read in English. LILE WRIT
    CLAS 0010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
  • Sport in the Ancient Greek World

    Athletics and sports were as popular and significant in the ancient Greek world as they are today, and so offer an excellent introduction to its archaeology and history. This class will discuss the development of Greek athletics, the nature of individual events, the social implications of athletic professionalism, women and athletics, and the role of sport in Greek education.
    CLAS 0210O S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cherry
  • Revolutionary Classics (or, the classical origins of your Brown education)

    When Brown University was founded in 1764 the curriculum was based on classical texts. In early America, the classics of Greek and Roman antiquity – read in the original Greek and Latin – were the foundation of a gentleman’s education. This course will explore early ideas and structures of higher learning in America from the springboard of those classical texts. We will read a sizable portion of Brown’s earliest curriculum (in English translation), but just as importantly we will seek to set that curriculum in the context of early American intellectual history, from roughly the Colonial to the Antebellum Period. FYS WRIT
    CLAS 0210R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
  • Social Welfare in the Ancient Greek City

    What inequalities existed in the ancient Greek city? This course seeks to identify the different treatment of the inhabitants of the Greek city (polis) and the degree to which the city sought to support the disadvantaged by the redistribution of wealth. Ancient Greek communities taxed activity and property, gathered revenue, and redistributed wealth within the community. The wealthy were often liable to redirect part of the wealth to the community. How well did the redistributive economy of the Greek city work? Who were the winners? Who were the losers? What conclusions can we draw about well-being in the Greek polis? WRIT SOPH
    CLAS 0310 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
  • The Tradition of the Philosophical Dialogue

    This course will examine the Greco-Roman tradition of the philosophical dialogue, from its Socratic origins through its adoption by early Christian authors. As we read dialogues by major practitioners including Plato, Cicero, Plutarch and Augustine, we will consider formal features of the dialogue, including setting, characterization, and authorial self-representation; and we will compare treatments of common subjects and themes, including Socrates, the pursuit of truth, good government, and the happy life. We will also discuss issues of performance and the philosophical, pedagogical, and therapeutic advantages of dialogue. All texts will be read in English.
    CLAS 0770 S01
    Primary Instructor
    McDonald
  • Concepts of the Self in Classical Indian Literature

    Examination of the great Indian epic Mahabharata and related mythology to introduce the context for the most ancient speculations of the Rgveda and the subtle teacher-student dialogues about the self contained in the Bhagavadgita and Upanishads. We will also examine the more systematic Indian philosophical texts and note their resonance in ancient and modern European conceptions of self.
    CLAS 0990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
  • Social Conflict and Political Factions in the Roman Republic

    Traces the evolution of social conflict and political factions at Rome from the foundation to the dissolution of the Republic (C5-C1 BCE). Roman armies secured a vast empire of territory, raw materials, and manpower governed by the senate and the people of Rome itself. The influx of resources, however, destabilized Rome’s constitution and upset political power balances at the city of Rome. How did the Romans—elites and masses—compete amongst themselves for the bounty of empire abroad and confront their own internal conflicts at home? Was concord possible, or were the developments of empire inconsistent with the constitution of the Republic?
    CLAS 1120R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
  • The Age of Constantine: The Roman Empire in Transition

    The reign of Constantine the Great (306-337) and his dynasty heralded a period of remarkable/rapid change in the Roman Empire. Christianity became the sole imperially sponsored religion; the split between Western and Eastern halves of the Empire gradually became permanent and irrevocable; consequently new ways of thinking and writing about the Roman world, past and future, developed. Focusing on generous selections of primary source material in translation and current scholarship, we will explore the history, literature, and culture of Constantinian Empire in order to highlight the role of Constantine and his successors in the evolution of the late Roman Mediterranean.
    CLAS 1120V S01
    Primary Instructor
    Insley
  • Roman History II: The Roman Empire and Its Impact

    The social and political history of the Roman Empire (14-565 CE). Focuses on expansion, administration, and Romanization of the empire; crisis of the 3rd century; militarization of society and monarchy; the struggle between paganism and Christianity; the end of the Empire in the West. Special attention given to the role of women, slaves, law, and historiography. Ancient sources in translation. WRIT
    CLAS 1320 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
  • Marriage in the Ancient World

    Marriage is a historical phenomenon: it assumes various forms and has distinct meanings in different societies, even those that have been regarded as the fountainhead of Western values. This course (a seminar addressed in particular to upper-level undergraduates) investigates this important social institution in ancient Greece and Rome, using a variety of primary documents (literary, historical, epigraphical, etc.) and taking account of modern approaches to the study of marriage, including anthropological, sociological and psychological theories. All sources will be read in English.
    CLAS 1750N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
  • Parasites and Hypocrites

    The course is a study of the many forms of toadying, groveling, feigning friendship, flattery, ass-kissing, and so on, that were such a large of source of concern — and comedy — in antiquity. The anxieties over hypocrisy in a democracy and parasites in client-patron systems will be explored historically, in literary representations, and in their social, political, and economic contexts. Authors to be read include Aristophanes, Plutarch, Lucian, Plautus, Horace, and Petronius.
    CLAS 1930C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Haynes
  • Special Topics

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    CLAS 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Alcock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Cherry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S11
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Scharf
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1970 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Conference: Especially for Honors Students

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    CLAS 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S05
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Haynes
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 1990 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Papaioannou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    CLAS 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor permission required.
    CLAS 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Alcock
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Cherry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Papaioannou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S11
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    CLAS 2980 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    CLAS 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep

GREK

  • Introduction to Ancient Greek

    Intensive, one-semester introduction to Greek. No previous knowledge of Greek is required.
  • Essentials of the Greek Language

    Second half of a two-semester approach to ancient Greek with special emphasis on developing facility in rapid reading of Greek literature. Selections from Attic Greek authors. No previous knowledge of Greek is required.
    GREK 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Janzen
  • Introduction to Greek Literature

    Prerequisite: GREK 0300 (or the equivalent). Review of grammar of the Attic dialect through rapid reading of texts by Lysias, Plato, or Xenophon. Emphasis on syntax and style.
    GREK 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    DiGiulio
  • Aristophanes

    Addresses students with at least an intermediate-level command of Ancient Greek, but previous knowledge of Aristophanic language and poetry is not required. We will read in the original language Aristopanes' Frogs, and study different aspects (language, meter, historical background, theatrical performances, literary interpretations, etc.) of this play and of Aristophanic comedy generally. Frogs, composed towards the end of the Peloponnesian War, is one of Aristophanes' most puzzling plays. It presents a fantasy (and comic!) vision of the afterlife and, indirectly, informs us about the literary criticism of the time.
    GREK 1050A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
  • Late Antique Historiography: Procopius of Caesarea

    This course will consider the writings of Procopius of Caesarea (ca. 500-565) in light of his place in Greek literary history, and his cultural context in the Late Roman Empire of Justinian. Sessions will combine a critical reading of texts in Greek with analysis of the author’s historical methods, style, and literary influences. We will study portions of all three of Procopius’ surviving works, beginning with The Wars, and continuing with The Secret History and The Buildings.
    GREK 1111C S01
    Primary Instructor
    Insley
  • Daphnis and Chloe

    Goethe said that you should read Longus’ “Daphnis and Chloe” once a year (in Greek, of course!). So if you haven’t read it yet, it’s time. One of the first novels ever written, it offers pirates, erotic encounters, and numerous goat-filled landscapes. Discussions include the origins and development of the prose novel, the political and social context of the times, and the beauty of Longus’ idyllic narrative.
    GREK 1111D S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
  • Early Greek Literature

    Surveys early Greek literature. Works studied include the Iliad, Odyssey, the Hesiodic poems, and archaic lyric and elegiac poetry. Emphasis on literary interpretation, the interpretive problems inherent in the study of archaic poetry, and the poetics of oral poetry. Extensive readings in the original.
    GREK 1810 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
  • Special Topics

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    GREK 1910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S03
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S04
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S06
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1910 S10
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Conference: Especially for Honors Students

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    GREK 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 1990 S05
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Athens on Stage, Athens as Stage

    This graduate seminar will interrogate how classical Athens performed itself - as a city and as an idea - to citizens, metics and foreigners. Our primary focus will be drama, especially plays set in Athens itself. But we will also consider the performative contexts of the plays (at festivals), and other sites of civic performance: the Panathenaea, the funeral oration and demosion sema, architecture, art, rhetoric, etc. Discussion will be rooted in the Athenian sources, but we will also draw upon ideas and concepts from other disciplines (e.g. civil religion, civic choreography, and city 'scenes' of performance).
    GREK 2100E S01
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
  • Preliminary Exam Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    GREK 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor permission required.
    GREK 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Gill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Nieto Hernandez
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Kidd
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Oliver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S11
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S12
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S13
    Primary Instructor
    Papaioannou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S14
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    GREK 2980 S15
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    GREK 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep

LATN

  • Introduction to Latin

    Intensive, one-semester introduction to Latin. No previous knowledge of Latin is required.
    LATN 0110 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Vanveldhuizen
  • Essentials of the Latin Language

    Second course in an intensive two-semester approach to Latin. Special emphasis on developing facility in the rapid reading of Latin literature. No previous knowledge of Latin is required.
  • Introduction to Latin Literature

    Introduction to Latin literature through intensive reading of major authors in prose and poetry with careful attention to grammar and style. Prerequisite: LATN 0100, 0200 or 0110 (or equivalent).
    LATN 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    LaFrance
  • Cicero, Verrines

    LATN 1020B S01
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
  • Fortunatus

    Wide reading in the occasional poetry of the most prolific writer of the early Middle Ages, attending to diction, meter, imagery, allusion, and paying special attention to the (homo- and hetero-) erotic pieces written to the poet's friends.
    LATN 1110F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
  • Dying in the Republic

    For those who witnessed the bloody violence and brutal butchering of the late Republic, death and dying were everywhere. What did these Romans believe happened to the dead? Was there an afterlife? This course explores two texts (Virgil and Cicero) that deal with visions from and of the spheres beyond the realm of the living. Discussion of supplementary material from other authors, religious studies, and material evidence further develop our notions of what it meant to die in the Republic.
    LATN 1110Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
  • Renaissance Latin Poetry

    This course will cover a diverse selection from the Latin poetry of the Renaissance (fourteenth through seventeenth centuries) in the original language. Epic, lyric, pastoral, and other forms will be on our reading list; we will go over the readings in class with an eye to linguistic questions as well as to literary and cultural questions and to the poets' rethinking and reshaping of the Classical past for present concerns. This course is open to students who have had at least two years of Latin or the equivalent.
    LATN 1120F S01
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
  • Special Topics

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    LATN 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S06
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S08
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1970 S10
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Conference: Especially for Honors Students

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    LATN 1990 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Hanink
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 1990 S07
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Allusion and Its Discontents

    Our concern is both the history and future of the study of allusion in Latin literature. We will explore the implications of the different terms and perspectives associated with our subject: most obviously, allusion and intertextuality, plus interpretative approaches that privilege authorial control and initiative, textual intentions, or readerly reception. Attention will be paid to negotiations not only between poetical works but also between prose works and between prose and poetry. We will also investigate the relationship between allusion and other types of textual appropriation, including translations, adaptations, and direct quotations. A wide variety of Latin texts will be read.
    LATN 2090H S01
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
  • Preliminary Exam Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    LATN 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor permission required.
    LATN 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Bodel
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Debrohun
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Reed
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Mignone
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Pucci
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Papaioannou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S07
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Scafuro
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    LATN 2980 S09
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    LATN 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep

MGRK

  • Introduction to Modern Greek

    A continuation of MGRK 0100. New students may place into it, after special arrangement with the instructor. The course continues on an integrative skills approach and aims to develop language skills, within a framework of specific topics and functions. The course objectives are to enable students to perform a range of tasks, master a minimum core vocabulary and acquire knowledge and understanding of various forms of Greek culture.
    MGRK 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
  • Intermediate Modern Greek

    A continuation of MGRK 0300. New students may place into it, after special arrangement with the instructor. It aims to enhance language skills within a variety of registers and themes; enable the students to master, use and understand effectively essential linguistic structures; examine a variety of expressive forms within an authentic cultural context.
    MGRK 0400 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
  • Advanced Modern Greek

    A continuation of MGRK 0500. Students who have not taken the previous sequence may take a placement test, after consultation with the instructor. The course aims to promote range, accuracy and fluency and enable students to develop ease and spontaneity with the language. Authentic materials drawn from a range of sources inform the content of the course and include films, literature, media, testimonies, music and internet based sources. The development of transcultural competence will be an essential component of the course.
    MGRK 0600 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
  • Special Topics in Modern Greek

    No description available.
    MGRK 1910 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Amanatidou
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research

SANS

  • Elementary Sanskrit II

    This course continues the survey of grammar and the reading exercises of SANS 100. The second half of this course reads selected passages of the Bhagavad Gītā and the beginning of the classic story of Nala and Damayantī from the Mahābhārata. Prerequisite: SANS 0100.
    SANS 0200 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
  • Classical Sanskrit Story Literature

    Introduces students to the more challenging Sanskrit of classical story literature and continues to extend the knowledge of Sanskrit grammar introduced in first year Sanskrit and developed in SANS 0300, as well as present basic Indian cultural themes. Prerequisite: SANS 0300.
  • Classical Schools of Indian Philosophy

    Introduction to the classical Brahminic darsanas (comprehensive, rationalized systems of philosophy and, or, theology dealing with Hermeneutics and Philosophy of Language, Logic, Metaphysics, and Ultimate Beatitude) and to corresponding Buddhist and Jain traditions through reading, in Sanskrit, of selected works. Prerequisite: SANS 0400.
    SANS 1800 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Buchta
  • Conference: Especially for Honors Students

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor's permission required.
    SANS 1990 S01
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Sanskrit Preliminary Exam Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    SANS 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Sanskrit Reading and Research

    Section numbers will vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course. Instructor permission required.
    SANS 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fitzgerald
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research