Brown University School of Engineering

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New research from Prof. K.S. Kim and Mazen Diab

How a wrinkle becomes a crease

The natural history of wrinkles, creases, and folds:
Kyung-Suk Kim and Mazen Diab have worked out the mathematics of how wrinkles form in solid materials under compression — and how, under more compression, those wrinkles can become creases. The mathematics of wrinkles and creases could help in the design of flexible electronic circuits, artificial skin, and soft robotic grips and may help explain brain injuries due to compression.

A virus reveals the physics of nanopores

A better way to study what actually happens at the nanopore:
Nanopores could provide a new way to sequence DNA quickly, but the physics involved isn’t well understood. That’s partly because of the complexities involved in studying the random, squiggly form DNA takes in solution. Researchers from Brown have simplified matters by using a stiff, rod-like virus instead of DNA to experiment with nanopores. Their research has uncovered previously unknown dynamics in polymer-nanopore interactions.


Research Update from Prof. Palmore and Pacifici

Progress on detecting glucose levels in saliva

Dealing with the 1 percent:
Researchers at Brown have developed a new biochip sensor that that can selectively measure glucose concentrations in a complex fluid like saliva. Their approach combines dye chemistry with plasmonic interferometry. A dependable glucose monitoring system that uses saliva rather than blood would be a significant improvement in managing diabetes.

ATARI 2600: IT WAS A START

Jenkins on ‘Cool Jobs’ at World Science Festival

Intuitive controls for complex machines:

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — Chad Jenkins remembers the day when he knew he wanted to be a computer scientist.

It was December 25, 1981. At the age of 7, Jenkins woke up Christmas morning to find an Atari 2600 video game console and a Space Invaders game cartridge. That started an obsession with video games that Jenkins would eventually build into a career as a computer scientist and roboticist.


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