Courses for Fall 2014

  • Perspectives on Social Interaction: An Introduction to Social Psychology

    An introduction to the discipline of sociology examining the individual in social situations. Explores the social development of the person, the development of interpersonal relationships, and the problems of integrating the individual and social system. For each area, the personal and situational factors that bear upon the issue are investigated. The objective is to deepen understanding of the behavior of people in a social context. WRIT
    SOC 0020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
  • American Heritage: Democracy, Inequality, and Public Policy

    America professes equality but exhibits many forms of inequality in schools, race relations, and income. An examination of contrasting elements of American society and a review of the role social science plays in public debate. To illuminate the debates, key topics, such as welfare, immigration, affirmative action, and environmental equity are considered.
    SOC 0130 S01
    Primary Instructor
    White
  • Sex, Gender, and Society

    An introduction to the sociological study of sex and gender. More specifically, this course explores how sexuality is perceived, defined, and experienced in the context of society. How sexuality influences our lives, is reflected in social norms, attitudes and beliefs, through public and private policies and practices, and the social institutions is also investigated. This class also focuses on how prevalent gender differences really are in our society and examines the social construction of gender.
    SOC 0230 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Classical Sociological Theory

    Why do we follow social rules and conventions? And how is social change – that is, the making of new rules and expectations – possible? When we respond to rules, do we act as free-willing individuals or do we follows social structures we have no control over? These questions have motivated generations of sociologists, but many of the arguments have been already developed by the four "forefathers" of sociology: Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and Georg Simmel. Looking at the transformations around them – the rise of capitalism, the modern nation-state, rational bureaucracy, the metropolitan, the decline of religion, and much more – they developed arguments that allow us to better understand ourselves, our actions, and the contemporary political, economic and social transformations around us. WRIT
    SOC 1010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
  • Methods of Social Research

    This course introduces students to the frameworks and methods of conducting sociological research -- from both a qualitative and quantitative perspective. The aim is that students develop the skills to ask and answer interesting and important questions about sociological phenomenon. The focus is on designing and executing research, from identifying an interesting question and reviewing the relevant literature, to collecting and analyzing data, to drawing reliable inferences and presenting meaningful results. There is a heavy focus on reading and discussing academic research and working in research teams. By the end of the semester students will complete their own research projects.
    SOC 1020 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
  • Introductory Statistics for Social Research

    Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics: measures of central tendencies and variability, sampling, tests of significance, correlation, and regression. Also includes the use of computers in data analysis. Knowledge of elementary algebra is assumed. Enrollment is limited to 144 students.
    SOC 1100 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    SOC 1100 C01
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C02
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C03
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C04
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C05
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
    SOC 1100 C06
    Schedule Code
    C: Conference
  • Focus Groups for Market and Social Research

    This course introduces students to a range of qualitative research methods commonly used in market and social science research. It is designed to provide students with a skill set that will allow them to conduct and design market and social research that gets below the surface of the traditional survey. Focus groups, ethnographic observation and user-centered research are widely used in product design, communications, marketing and entrepreneurship research. Students will learn and practice all of the methods introduced in the course by conducting a semester-long research project, will gain insight into which methods are most appropriate for particular research needs.
    SOC 1117 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Dicarlo
  • Micro-Organizational Theory: Social Behavior in Organizations

    Micro-Organizational Theory focuses on the human dynamics of organizations as natural systems. It examines how individual attitudes, actions, and interactions make a difference for organizational processes and outcomes. This focus is contrasted with more macro-level approaches, which take the organization (instead of the individual) as the primary unit of analysis. For example, studies of organizations from an economic perspective are typically concerned with the performance of the organization relative to its competitors. Studies of organizations from a macro-sociological focus are typically concerned with an organization's routines and structures, contextualized by the broader environment. SOC 1311 takes a more micro and meso perspective that asks questions such as, "why do individuals in organization behave the way they do, how does this affect the organizations of which they are a part and how, in turn, are individuals affected by their organizations?"
    SOC 1311 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
  • Employment and Labor in the New Economy

    This class will introduce students to classical and contemporary theories pertaining to work, employment, and labor markets. Readings and class discussions will specifically focus on individuals’ careers and employment processes within organizations. The course will examine: (1) the sociology of labor markets, (2) employment and careers in the new economy and (3) job search, networks, and hiring decisions. Students will develop knowledge of these key theories, which will be applied in high-profile organizational settings.
    SOC 1352 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Rissing
  • Intimate Violence

    Explores sociological perspectives of violence in intimate relationships. Begins with theories of violence, including social learning theory, the frustration-aggression hypothesis, and violence as catharsis. Examines the contributions of gender, race status, media violence, and pornography to the issue. Investigates specific forms of intimate violence: sexual aggression (including "acquaintance rape"), partner abuse, elderly abuse, and child abuse. Not open to first year students.
    SOC 1440 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
  • Comparative Development

    An exploration of the economic, political, and social changes that constitute development. Both the historical experience of Europe and the contemporary Third World are considered. Major processes examined include state and nation-building, agricultural modernization, colonialism, industrialization, revolution and socialism, authoritarianism and democracy, and socioeconomic distribution. Emphasis on the countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
    SOC 1600 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Schrank
  • Transnational Social Movements and the Environment

    Globalization presents distinct environmental challenges and alters the terrain upon which social movements mobilize and engage for change. How can we understand the relationships between globalization, the environment and society? In what ways is inequality being shaped in this context? How do social movements and advocacy networks engage transnationally to find leverage? Through readings, writing, film, multimedia projects, and engagement with case studies and social theory, this course explores how social movements and advocacy networks mobilize transnationally to achieve environmental justice and sustainability.
    SOC 1630 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Ciplet
  • Investing in Social Change

    Philanthropy -- "giving away money" -- sounds attractive and simple. But the very acts of contributing and receiving resources affect dynamics and relationships among all involved. We explore philanthropic strategies, social change, the sociological dimensions of philanthropy in historic and current practice. Students engage in teams to investigate a particular community concern, design an investment strategy, recommend the investment of grant dollars. Instructor permission required. Course enrollment is by application only. Applications can be found at swearercenter.brown.edu shortly before the start of class. Students who pre-register must still be selected through the application process and attend the first class meeting. Enrollment limited to 18. WRIT
    SOC 1870A S01
    Primary Instructor
    Cook
  • Environmental Sociology

    The seminar provides students with a selective overview of major approaches , debates, and interdisciplinary cross-currents shaping the field of environmental sociology. The course is specifically intended to give substantive background to undergraduate students interested in pursuing a specialization in environmental sociology or a related field in graduate studies. It will also give sociology graduate students a broad foundation from which to build their own environmental sociological research program. However, in neither case is the course meant to substitute for extensive independent study, nor is it limited to students already committed to pursuing such research. WRIT
    SOC 1870N S01
    Primary Instructor
    Frickel
  • Explaining China's Rise: Development and Accumulation in Contemporary China

    Few questions pose more significance to scholars and policymakers than the "rise of China". As scholars grapple with explaining China's rise, they also provide tantalizing previews of the future of Chinese growth, by extension, the future of global economy. This course explores the character, conditions, consequences of the rapid Chinese economic growth that many have termed " capitalism with Chinese characteristics". 3 paradigms for explaining growth: a state-centered approach, a market-oriented approach, Marxist, accumulation-centered approach. 3 parts, each examining a separate paradigm of development, providing case studies this paradigm explains growth in specific industries and sectors of the Chinese economy.
    SOC 1870P S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chuang
  • Theories of the Third Sector and Civil Society

    Third Sector- consisting of non-government, nonprofit, social movements organizations-- is an increasingly important segment of societies worldwide. This seminar will train students to critically apply organizational theory to evaluate the contributions, opportunities and challenges of this sector. We will probe critical third sector issues, including: impact, accountability, and sustainability of sector activities; commons issues in the sector such as legitimacy and co-optation; the dynamics of government collaboration; and what constitutes social justice in the distribution of the sector's resources. Prerequisite: at least one course in Sociology. Enrollment preference given to Sociology and BEO concentrators. WRIT
    SOC 1871M S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kallman
  • Law, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    This seminar explores the relationship between legal institutions and macro-organizational change. The course devotes particular attention to the legal and organizational processes that shape (and are shaped by) the emergence of new technologies, new enterprises, and new industries. Although discussions may touch on technical aspects of law and/or entrepreneurship, most topics and materials focus on the general sociological processes that underlie changing organizational environments. The seminar is aimed at advanced students who have some prior familiarity with the sociology of law is helpful, but not essential. Through shared and individual readings, weekly discussions, and e-mail dialogues, the course provides an opportunity for students to refine and extend their thinking on important and controversial topics at the intersection of the contemporary organizational and socio-legal literatures. Prerequisite: SOC 1030 required (waivable by permission of instructor). Enrollment limited to 20 juniors, seniors, and graduate students. WRIT
    SOC 1871O S01
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
  • Legacies of Inequality: The U.S. and Beyond

    Does education equalize or widen gaps between people and nations? Has mass imprisonment reduced crime or exacerbated U.S. racial inequality? Does biology determine destiny, or is society more fluid? This course introduces theory and research on social inequality, emphasizing temporal dimensions of social differentiation. Attention will be paid to the characteristics we are given (race, sex), those we achieve (education, income), and institutions and policies we encounter throughout the life cycle (schools, the justice system). By understanding the complexities of social inequality and the challenges of devising solutions, students will leave as informed citizens, better equipped to enter any profession. Enrollment limited to 20. First year students require instructor permission.
    SOC 1871S S01
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
  • Martial Arts, Culture, and Society

    In this upper level undergraduate course for which there are no prerequisites, we will consider how sociology, and other social sciences, can help us understand martial arts and how martial arts might inform the social sciences. We shall consider how various bodymindful martial practices, their organizations, and their cultures shape, and are shaped by, different structures of power at various levels of society. We concentrate on martial arts because they straddle such an important axial dimension of society around violence. First priority to Sociology Concentrators. Enrollment limited to 20.
    SOC 1871Z S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
  • Senior Seminar

    Advanced research seminar for sociology concentrators. Students take each semester in senior year to work on an honors thesis. Participants examine methods for analyzing, writing, and presenting thesis material and apply peer review techniques in assessing each other's work. Culminates in presentation of thesis to the department. Students doing independent study research may also participate with the instructor's permission. Required for "honors" in sociology. WRIT
    SOC 1950 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
  • Individual Research Project

    Supervised reading or research. Specific program arranged in terms of the student's individual needs and interests. Required of intensive concentrators; open to others only by written consent of the Chair of the department. Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1970 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Allen
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Dill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hogan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S13
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Bridwell-Mitchell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Modell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S20
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S23
    Primary Instructor
    Nozaki
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1970 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Senior Honors Thesis

    Research seminar for students writing an honors thesis. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, students construct and carry out a research project. The written report of the research is submitted to the advisor for honors consideration. A second reader selected by the thesis advisor certifies that the thesis is of honors quality. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 1980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Allen
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Dill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hogan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S13
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Bridwell-Mitchell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Modell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Smith
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 1980 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Multivariate Statistical Methods I

    Introduction to probability, descriptive statistics and statistical inference. Coverage of the linear model, its assumptions and potential biases. Emphasis on hypothesis testing, model selection and interpretation through application with real data.
    SOC 2010 S01
    Primary Instructor
    White
  • Classical Sociological Theory

    This is a graduate-level course requires students to engage in detailed analysis and critical review of sociological thought of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The class will introduce students to the critical thinking, methodological innovation, and historical imagination of sociological theory by reading the original texts of the forefathers of sociology, including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim and others.
    SOC 2040 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
  • Principles of Population

    An advanced introduction to theoretical and substantive issues in the social scientific study of population. Major areas within sociology are integrated with the study of population, including the comparative–historical analysis of development, family processes, social stratification, ethnicity, ecological studies, and social policy. Primarily for first year Graduate students.
    SOC 2080 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Fussell
  • Qualitative Methods

    Emphasis on ethnographic field work through participant observation and interviews. Some attention to content analysis and visual sociology. Technical training in developing observational and interview guidelines, data collection, coding, transcript analysis, and computer applications. Strong emphasis on quality writing. Analysis of ethnographic research in book and article format. Attention to recent developments in ethnography, especially reflexivity and autoethnography.
    SOC 2210 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
  • Sociology Paper Writing Seminar

    This is a special seminar for graduate students in Sociology on the art of writing research papers for publication. The goals of the course are to: 1) learn the process of writing by drafting or redrafting a complete research paper, one section at a time 2) participate in the process of critical peer review 3)become knowledgeable about the process of submission/publication in peer-reviewed journals in Sociology and related social science fields 4) become more familiar with the often hidden processes of journal review , publication ethics, and interpreting/responding to editorial decisions
    SOC 2460 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Short
  • Teaching Practicum in Sociology

    No description available.
  • Geographic Information Systems and Spatial Analysis for the Social Sciences

    This course is intended for graduate students seeking to learn the basics of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and how to incorporate spatial questions into social science research. The course is primarily a methods course and through required independent project work, students will learn how GIS and spatial analysis are typically employed across the social sciences. By the end students will be proficient in independent use of ArcGIS, most frequently used GIS software package, and will be able to apply the more common tools of spatial analysis. They will also know basics of cartography.
    SOC 2612 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Franklin
  • Urbanization in a Global System

    The world is undergoing an unprecedented wave of urban growth, and already more than half of the world's population in living in towns and cities. This course takes a global view of urban issues. In earlier developing regions such as North America and Europe, the focus is on a large scale restructuring of cities related to cycles of growth and decline , challenges to the social safety net, and replacement of local populations by immigrants with different racial, and ethnic or religious backgrounds.
    SOC 2960R S01
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
  • Sociology of Gender

    This is an advance graduate level seminar in sociology of gender. Our discussions will focus on the theoretical approaches that characterize research in this area. Research practice emphasized. Knowledge of social theory and social research methods is essential. SOC 2430 is a prerequisite. By the end of this course you should be able to, demonstrate an understanding of theoretical and methodological perspectives relevant to research of sociology of gender. Critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of current research. Demonstrate ability to synthesize, critique, and extend current literature in written form. apply sociological reasoning, and ability to conduct independent research.
    SOC 2960W S01
    Primary Instructor
    Short
  • Preliminary Examination Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing for a preliminary examination.
    SOC 2970 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep
  • Reading and Research

    Section numbers vary by instructor. Please check Banner for the correct section number and CRN to use when registering for this course.
    SOC 2980 S01
    Primary Instructor
    Allen
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S02
    Primary Instructor
    Brown
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S03
    Primary Instructor
    Dill
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S04
    Primary Instructor
    Elliott
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S05
    Primary Instructor
    Fennell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S06
    Primary Instructor
    Dicarlo
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S07
    Primary Instructor
    Heller
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S08
    Primary Instructor
    Henry
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S09
    Primary Instructor
    Hogan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S10
    Primary Instructor
    Itzigsohn
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S11
    Primary Instructor
    Lindstrom
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S12
    Primary Instructor
    Logan
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S13
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S14
    Primary Instructor
    Franklin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S15
    Primary Instructor
    Modell
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S16
    Primary Instructor
    Jackson
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S17
    Primary Instructor
    Kennedy
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S18
    Primary Instructor
    Short
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S19
    Primary Instructor
    Silver
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S20
    Primary Instructor
    Spearin
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S21
    Primary Instructor
    White
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S22
    Primary Instructor
    Chorev
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S23
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S24
    Primary Instructor
    Suchman
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S25
    Primary Instructor
    Vanwey
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
    SOC 2980 S26
    Primary Instructor
    Pacewicz
    Schedule Code
    I: Independent Study/Research
  • Thesis Preparation

    For graduate students who have met the tuition requirement and are paying the registration fee to continue active enrollment while preparing a thesis.
    SOC 2990 S01
    Schedule Code
    E: Grad Enrollment Fee/Dist Prep